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Willie Horton

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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 12, 1993
Some people visit Baltimore to check out Oriole Park. Others come for the Preakness. Others for Miss Bonnie's Elvis Shrine.Jeffrey Elliot comes here to see Willie Horton.He has come up from North Carolina a few times, dropping by the Maryland Penitentiary after 2 a.m. -- a condition imposed by prison officials -- to interview the convicted murderer, rapist and unwitting poster child of the 1988 George Bush campaign.Elliot, a professor of political science at North Carolina Central University and a prolific writer, might not be the only journalist still interested in Horton, but he is apparently the only with access.
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NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2008
WASHINGTON - On a Web site he calls ExposeObama.com, Floyd G. Brown, the producer of the "Willie Horton" ad that helped to defeat Michael Dukakis in 1988, is preparing an encore. Brown is raising money for a series of ads that he says will show Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois to be out of touch on an issue of fundamental concern to voters: violent crime. One spot already on the Internet attacks the presumptive Democratic nominee for opposing a bill while he was an Illinois legislator that would have extended the death penalty to gang-related murders.
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NEWS
July 16, 1992
Four years ago, Willie Horton was the unwitting point man, the cutting edge, the bludgeon of George Bush's winning campaign for president. Horton, a black convict furloughed by Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis when he was governor of Massachusetts, had raped a Maryland woman when he was outside prison bars and thereby became part of history.A Republican operative by the name of Floyd Brown made a TV commercial at once covertly racist and overtly suggestive that the Democrats were soft on crime.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | April 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Breaking news: There's been a sighting of the Compassionate Conservative. You remember that guy, George W. Bush by name. Years before he pronounced himself "the decider," he was the "uniter, not a divider" who promised to govern with benevolent concern for society's less-fortunate. A compassionate conservative, he said, acknowledging by implication that conservatives had not previously distinguished themselves by their big-heartedness. Then Mr. Bush became president, and the compassion went out of his conservatism like air from a leaky tire.
NEWS
February 21, 1992
Candidate George Bush wasted no time in appealing to the military tradition of Southern voters. The day after the New Hampshire primary, he was in Knoxville, Tenn., the home state of the legendary World War I Army hero Sgt. Alvin York, to praise the state's 6,700 reservists and National Guard members who served in Operation Desert Storm. His strategy is reported to be to remind Southerners over and over again that Pat Buchanan opposed the war effort.Mr. Buchanan appears to be planning an appeal to another Southern tradition.
NEWS
By George W. Grayson | February 27, 2004
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- In this year's GOP television campaign ads, newlyweds' radiant faces may replace the menacing hulk of released murderer Willie Horton, who was the bogeyman in commercials that President Bush's father aired in 1988 to nail his Democratic opponent as soft on crime. Recent nuptials for more than 3,300 homosexual couples in San Francisco combined with the approval by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court of gay marriages may give President Bush another four-year term.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1990
The guy asked me if any famous people lived in Baltimore, and I told him of course they did.Baltimore, I reminded him, was where the first refrigerator was invented in 1803, the first Ouija board in 1892 and the first revolving restaurant in 1964.When you are on the cutting edge, I said, the celebrities beat a path to your door.And then I named some literary and political figures who call Baltimore home.The guy nodded at some and gave me blank stares at others. And it occurred to me that I had forgotten to name Baltimore's most famous resident.
NEWS
By Gunther Wertheimer | April 26, 1991
UNCENSORED images of the Kurdish tragedy have diminished the euphoria many Americans felt after the victory over Iraq. Nonetheless, Republican strategists looking toward the 1992 elections plan to exploit that triumph to retain the White House and recapture the Senate.They are not likely to be entirely successful. But the goal already is creating a tone that bodes ill for the political battles ahead. If you thought 1988 was a dirty campaign, you ain't seen nothing.Willie Horton and the flag were the essential features of the GOP's 1988 strategy.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 19, 1991
New York. - "Journalists are the second most disliked professional group in the country,'' said Roger Rosenblatt in a one-man show, ''Free Speech in America,'' that opened last week at the American Place Theater here. Only one group ranks lower in polls: members of Congress.''It must be true,'' said the man who does the essays on the MacNeil-Lehrer show and in Life magazine. ''Congressmen are the only people who seek out our company.''That is so. Of course, being congressfolk -- a few of them are women -- it is on our expense accounts or in our homes that they seek us out. Some congressmen do not even have homes of their own, or if they do, they have forgotten where it is that they put their wives and children.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | May 10, 1992
It is easy to discredit the White House attack on "failed" welfare programs. Within 24 hours of press secretary Marlin Fitzwater's statement blaming social programs for the conditions leading to the Los Angeles rioting, newspapers across the country already had spotted the logical flaws -- programs that work, such as Head Start; welfare reforms passed in the late 1980s; the fact that Republican presidents have controlled the White House for 20 of the past...
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
The statistic is well-known -- the United States imprisons people at a rate far higher than any other industrialized country. More than 2 million Americans are behind bars. According to the latest federal statistics, at midyear 2003, one in every 140 U.S. residents was behind bars. The number of inmates has risen by a half million in the past decade. Among men age 25 to 29, 12.8 percent of blacks were in prison or jail compared with about 1.6 percent of whites. In some African-American inner-city neighborhoods, more than a third of the young males are under the control of the corrections system.
NEWS
By George W. Grayson | February 27, 2004
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- In this year's GOP television campaign ads, newlyweds' radiant faces may replace the menacing hulk of released murderer Willie Horton, who was the bogeyman in commercials that President Bush's father aired in 1988 to nail his Democratic opponent as soft on crime. Recent nuptials for more than 3,300 homosexual couples in San Francisco combined with the approval by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court of gay marriages may give President Bush another four-year term.
TOPIC
By Ishmael Reed | December 24, 2000
MANY PEOPLE of the world follow events in the United States with interest, even fascination. During my trips to Asia, Europe and Africa, I have met foreign intellectuals who know more about the politics of this country than many American citizens. For example, while visiting Nigeria last year, I met writers and journalists who knew every detail of the impeachment trial of President Clinton. Last month, I visited universities and met with intellectuals, writers and students in Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon and Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | April 25, 1999
The war on crime is over and we lost. Not that crime rates are rising -- in fact, criminal activity has been declining dramatically for most of this decade. Organized crime, long assumed to be as perennial as death and taxes, has been virtually wiped out by RICO-armed feds. In many cases, sophisticated DNA testing provides unprecedented assurance that the convicts who do the time actually did the crime, prison populations are at record highs.But no one feels safer. Indeed, in "The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things" by Barry Glassner (Basic Books, 231 pages, $25)
FEATURES
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 1998
In our history, racism has clearly made it too easy to convict people. But it can also make it too hard. The man who raped me when I was 21 deserved to be punished without regard to race or racism. Whatever happened to him in his life, he was still %J responsible for what he did to me. That much, at least, I always knew."At once coolly analytical and emotionally supercharged, it is an extraordinary statement, especially because of who said it: Susan Estrich. In 1988, she was the national manager of the Dukakis presidential campaign, a liberal run doomed by the candidate's soft-on-crime shrug after a black murderer named Willie Horton, enjoying a weekend pass from a Massachusetts prison, violently raped a Maryland woman.
NEWS
October 18, 1995
WILLIE HORTON isn't likely to ever rent a house in Carroll County. The convicted murderer and rapist, whose image helped George Bush defeat Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential race, is still behind bars in Maryland. Sentenced to two life sentences, he will remain there for decades. So, why was his picture and name used on a flier urging people to attend an informational meeting in South Carroll last week about a proposed 250-unit rental apartment complex in Carrolltown?To stir fear. And prejudice.
NEWS
October 18, 1995
WILLIE HORTON isn't likely to ever rent a house in Carroll County. The convicted murderer and rapist, whose image helped George Bush defeat Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential race, is still behind bars in Maryland. Sentenced to two life sentences, he will remain there for decades. So, why was his picture and name used on a flier urging people to attend an informational meeting in South Carroll last week about a proposed 250-unit rental apartment complex in Carrolltown?To stir fear. And prejudice.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 9, 2008
WASHINGTON - On a Web site he calls ExposeObama.com, Floyd G. Brown, the producer of the "Willie Horton" ad that helped to defeat Michael Dukakis in 1988, is preparing an encore. Brown is raising money for a series of ads that he says will show Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois to be out of touch on an issue of fundamental concern to voters: violent crime. One spot already on the Internet attacks the presumptive Democratic nominee for opposing a bill while he was an Illinois legislator that would have extended the death penalty to gang-related murders.
NEWS
By ANNE HADDAD and ANNE HADDAD,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
The anonymous distributor of a racist flier might have the same goal as a South Carroll group trying to stop a proposed 250-unit rental townhouse development in Eldersburg.But the motivation is different, say the leaders."As soon as I got it, I threw it in the trash," said Kathleen Horneman, a neighborhood activist with South Carroll Community Coalition. "My reaction was pretty typical of everyone else. I would love to know what type of sick mind generated it, but maybe I don't want to know, because it could be one of my neighbors."
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