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NEWS
June 13, 2007
Pasta class -- A cooking demonstration highlighting summer pasta dishes will include wine and food tastings at 6 p.m. June 22 at Donna's of Columbia, 5850 Waterloo Road. $40. There is a 48-hour cancellation policy. Reservations are required; call 410-659-5248, ext. 112 or visit donnas.com. Ice Cream 101 --Learn how to make different types of ice cream at Williams-Sonoma stores on June 24. At 10 a.m. in Cross Keys, 70 Village Square, and 11 a.m. in Annapolis, 1705 Annapolis Mall. Free. For more information, visit Williams-Sonoma stores.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2009
Applicants rise for JHU nursing, education schools Applications to the Johns Hopkins University's schools of education and nursing are on the rise, according to school officials. For the six months that ended Dec. 31, applications for the School of Education rose 30 percent, while submissions for the School of Nursing climbed 11 percent compared with the period a year ago. Enterprise president to retire April 15 Columbia-based Enterprise Community Investment Inc., a provider of affordable housing finance, said yesterday that its president and chief executive, Jeffrey H. Donahue, will retire April 15. Donahue, 62, who had served as chief executive for six years, will be succeeded by Charles R. Werhane, the company's vice chairman and chief operating officer.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 4, 1998
Photos, graphics for your sweet toothSomething new at something old: Donna Beth Joy Shapiro, owner of the Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room (414 E. 31st St.), has a new computerized tool that prints edible photographs and graphics on cakes and cookies. She's making postcard-sized gift cookies using antique Baltimore and holiday postcard designs ($5). Also new at the tearoom are parties for kids featuring a cream tea (scones, cake and tea) and a scrapbooking project. Call 410-889-7112 for more information.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
Larry M. Wolf, a talent scout for emerging retail businesses during his many years as a top Rouse Co. leasing executive who also discovered that pushcarts added profits and atmosphere to shopping malls, died of pancreatic cancer Thursday at his Naples, Fla., home. The North Baltimore resident was 72. "Larry was always on the prowl for a new and different merchant," said Mathias J. DeVito, who was chief executive officer of the development firm from 1973 to 1984. "He had merchandising at his fingertips, and he took chances with people who were new in their field."
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | July 19, 2000
Juicy health tip Sure, watermelon is a refreshing summer treat, but now there is a new reason to enjoy a slice. Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found that watermelon contains high levels of lycopene - an antioxidant that may help the body fight cancer and prevent disease. Freezing point Fill containers almost to full when freezing food, a recent issue of Cooking Light recommends. Putting a small portion of food into a large container captures air that could allow ice crystals to form.
NEWS
By CAROLYN JUNG and CAROLYN JUNG,SAN JOSE (CALIF.) MERCURY NEWS | October 23, 2005
Once we were content to cook with flimsy pots and two types of cake pans (round and angel food), and to eat little beyond meat and potatoes, iceberg lettuce and a fair amount of lime-green Jell-O. Then along came Charles E. "Chuck" Williams, with his keen eye and impeccable taste, and an uncanny ability to know what we needed in our kitchens long before we ever did. It wasn't long before he had us mesmerized by KitchenAid stand mixers, Cuisinart food processors, Krups coffee makers and juicers -- as well as zesters, saute pans, tart pans and real Italian aceto balsamico.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
Think "whisk" and the familiar balloon-shaped utensil surely comes to mind -- the bigger, the better for whipping cream and meringues to impressive heights. But for this Sunday's Easter brunches and dinners, cooks are just as likely to pull out the smaller "sauce whisk," essential for marrying the disparate elements of gravies, beurre blancs and other fragile accompaniments. The sauce whisk takes more forms: tightly wound coil, skinny balloon, flat wire. Which performs best? I tested four of these whisks on sauces that would be at home on the Easter table -- a curried mint sauce and a velvety hollandaise.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Sitting prettyFurniture designer David Wiesand starts, perhaps, with his own pair of 19th-century Italian chairs for inspiration. Then he increases the scale for current taste and discards what he sees as unnecessary ornamentation "hampering the form underneath." The results are the designs for his new line of custom-made painted chairs.What makes these chairs so spectacular is not only their designs but their finishes. One of the most popular, he says, has been ivory crackle with gold-leaf accents.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 24, 2002
After a 25-year hiatus, I have recently gotten back on the wedding merry-go-round. Not mine. Other people's. Every woman has gone through that period in life when all her friends are getting married - one right after the other. As I remember it, it was a dismal time of hideously bad bridesmaid dresses and hideously expensive gifts of china and crystal the couple never used, either because they never entertained or they never entertained an odd number of guests. This time around, it is the children of friends who are getting married, and the good news is that I can wear the same little black dress to every wedding, no matter how long it takes to get this next generation married off. The bad news is that the bridal registry business has left me behind in the last 25 years.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
Some cookbooks are good for showing off and some are very practical. The must-have cookbooks are the ones that can do both. The Williams-Sonoma line of cookbooks set the standard for this kind of dual accomplishment and the latest, Williams-Sonoma Essentials of Baking by Cathy Burgett, Elinor Klivans and Lou Seibert Pappas (Oxmoor House, 2003, $34.95), does not disappoint. First, of course, it's beautiful. Filled with mouthwatering photographs of fresh-baked breads, cookies, cakes, pies and pastries, this is a book in search of a coffee table.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
Pasta class -- A cooking demonstration highlighting summer pasta dishes will include wine and food tastings at 6 p.m. June 22 at Donna's of Columbia, 5850 Waterloo Road. $40. There is a 48-hour cancellation policy. Reservations are required; call 410-659-5248, ext. 112 or visit donnas.com. Ice Cream 101 --Learn how to make different types of ice cream at Williams-Sonoma stores on June 24. At 10 a.m. in Cross Keys, 70 Village Square, and 11 a.m. in Annapolis, 1705 Annapolis Mall. Free. For more information, visit Williams-Sonoma stores.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
Think "whisk" and the familiar balloon-shaped utensil surely comes to mind -- the bigger, the better for whipping cream and meringues to impressive heights. But for this Sunday's Easter brunches and dinners, cooks are just as likely to pull out the smaller "sauce whisk," essential for marrying the disparate elements of gravies, beurre blancs and other fragile accompaniments. The sauce whisk takes more forms: tightly wound coil, skinny balloon, flat wire. Which performs best? I tested four of these whisks on sauces that would be at home on the Easter table -- a curried mint sauce and a velvety hollandaise.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
The produce stands hold great appeal this time of year. Also a great amount of peel and skin. Vegetable peelers typically don't cost much, but they can make a big difference in how hard you have to work to get to that fresh asparagus, juicy peach or crisp apple. Which peeler is best? That question was harder to answer than we thought. With so many on the market - stationary blades versus swiveling ones, serrated edges and straight, Y-shaped versus vertical designs - each of the nine we tested had its pluses and minuses, depending on what it was being used for. Two of our purchases were "julienne" peelers only, meant not for removing skin but for creating matchstick cuts of fruit and vegetables.
NEWS
By CAROLYN JUNG and CAROLYN JUNG,SAN JOSE (CALIF.) MERCURY NEWS | October 23, 2005
Once we were content to cook with flimsy pots and two types of cake pans (round and angel food), and to eat little beyond meat and potatoes, iceberg lettuce and a fair amount of lime-green Jell-O. Then along came Charles E. "Chuck" Williams, with his keen eye and impeccable taste, and an uncanny ability to know what we needed in our kitchens long before we ever did. It wasn't long before he had us mesmerized by KitchenAid stand mixers, Cuisinart food processors, Krups coffee makers and juicers -- as well as zesters, saute pans, tart pans and real Italian aceto balsamico.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
Some cookbooks are good for showing off and some are very practical. The must-have cookbooks are the ones that can do both. The Williams-Sonoma line of cookbooks set the standard for this kind of dual accomplishment and the latest, Williams-Sonoma Essentials of Baking by Cathy Burgett, Elinor Klivans and Lou Seibert Pappas (Oxmoor House, 2003, $34.95), does not disappoint. First, of course, it's beautiful. Filled with mouthwatering photographs of fresh-baked breads, cookies, cakes, pies and pastries, this is a book in search of a coffee table.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
Baltimore-area food lovers have a new place to pursue their passion with the opening of the Williams-Sonoma Grande Cuisine store in the Towson Town Center. Customers can sample specialty foods in a tasting bar and view cooking demonstrations by local chefs at the expanded Williams-Sonoma store. New features include a food hall, which offers specialty food items, and a cookbook library. The store is open from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 410-847-9021.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2009
Applicants rise for JHU nursing, education schools Applications to the Johns Hopkins University's schools of education and nursing are on the rise, according to school officials. For the six months that ended Dec. 31, applications for the School of Education rose 30 percent, while submissions for the School of Nursing climbed 11 percent compared with the period a year ago. Enterprise president to retire April 15 Columbia-based Enterprise Community Investment Inc., a provider of affordable housing finance, said yesterday that its president and chief executive, Jeffrey H. Donahue, will retire April 15. Donahue, 62, who had served as chief executive for six years, will be succeeded by Charles R. Werhane, the company's vice chairman and chief operating officer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 29, 1992
Washington -- As Chuck Williams sees it, there are similarities between selling hardware and selling cookware.Williams knows both fields. Back in the '50s he transformed his hardware store in Sonoma, Calif., into a kitchen supply store, soon moving it to San Francisco. That was the beginning of what is now a national Williams-Sonoma empire with over 100 stores, including three in the Baltimore area.The secret to success in hardware as well as housewares, Williams said, is hiring folks who are familiar with the devices they are selling.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 24, 2002
After a 25-year hiatus, I have recently gotten back on the wedding merry-go-round. Not mine. Other people's. Every woman has gone through that period in life when all her friends are getting married - one right after the other. As I remember it, it was a dismal time of hideously bad bridesmaid dresses and hideously expensive gifts of china and crystal the couple never used, either because they never entertained or they never entertained an odd number of guests. This time around, it is the children of friends who are getting married, and the good news is that I can wear the same little black dress to every wedding, no matter how long it takes to get this next generation married off. The bad news is that the bridal registry business has left me behind in the last 25 years.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | November 11, 2001
If you've seen Bratt Decor pieces, you've not forgotten them: the Casablanca crib with ostrich plumes ascending from each corner; the pleasantly squat armoire with dragonflies painted on its translucent doors; the scrolled iron Zanzibar bassinet draped in mosquito netting. Luxurious, yet funky. And if you wanted them, you had to venture to such stores as Saks or FAO Baby. But the couple behind the cribs et al. (Stephen Bauer designs, Mary Bauer handles marketing) live and work in Baltimore, and they've opened a showroom downtown in a vast Victorian building that -- how perfect -- once housed an amusement park.
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