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By M. Dion Thompson | December 12, 1990
In what is believed to be a first in federal courts in Maryland, a reputed Baltimore drug lord and a dozen of his alleged co-conspirators went on trial yesterday, their fate to be decided by a jury whose names and addresses are being kept secret to protect against jury tampering.The U.S. District Court trial of Linwood "Rudi" Williams, who is accused of having brought enormous quantities of heroin into metropolitan Baltimore, is expected to last at least three months. Prosecutors are expected to call dozens of witnesses and produce hundreds of wiretapped phone calls in their effort to convict Mr. Williams and his organization in one of the biggest drug cases in Baltimore in recent years.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in August 2012 announced that two men, Bryan Eammon Williams and Lawrence Lee Hayes, had been sentenced to 11 years and 15 years respectively for their roles in a cocaine distribution conspiracy. The details of the case are rather fascinating if you keep reading, and even moreso if you start connecting dots.  The press release about Hayes' and Williams' sentences includes a canned quote from Ava Cooper-Davis, the special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Washington field office, calling the case "drug interdiction at its best.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
To the dismay of prosecutors, a man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history was freed yesterday of what had been a 22-year sentence for a gun crime and vowed as he walked away from the city's federal courthouse to dedicate his life to serving God. Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, 61, served nearly four years on a handgun possession conviction before his attorney successfully argued that Williams did not meet the technical requirements...
NEWS
By HENRY WEINSTEIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- California law enforcement officials have launched an unusually fierce campaign to block clemency for Stanley "Tookie" Williams, co-founder of the Crips, whose impending execution is shaping up as the state's most closely watched death penalty battle in decades. In arguments both legal and emotional, officials are asking Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to reject pleas from clergymen, legislators and entertainers that Williams, who is scheduled to be put to death Dec. 13 for the murders of four people, has redeemed himself by his work on death row to dissuade young people from joining gangs.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
Federal prosecutors in August 2012 announced that two men, Bryan Eammon Williams and Lawrence Lee Hayes, had been sentenced to 11 years and 15 years respectively for their roles in a cocaine distribution conspiracy. The details of the case are rather fascinating if you keep reading, and even moreso if you start connecting dots.  The press release about Hayes' and Williams' sentences includes a canned quote from Ava Cooper-Davis, the special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Washington field office, calling the case "drug interdiction at its best.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 9, 1991
The sentencing of convicted heroin distributor Linwood "Rudy" Williams and three co-conspirators has been delayed until Nov. 22 so defense attorneys can challenge the government's suggested sentences.Three of the seven defendants convicted in the Williams case last March -- Sevino Braxton, Harold D. Harrison and James Williamston -- were sentenced Friday as scheduled by Senior Judge Frank A. Kaufman in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.The three were convicted of heroin possession, possession with intent to distribute it and/or firearms counts tied to Linwood Williams' four-year drug operation here.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
An Anne Arundel County judge ruled yesterday that DNA evidence may be used against Scotland E. Williams, the man charged with killing two Arnold lawyers in May.The evidence comes from microscopic cells scraped from a drinking glass found in the victims' kitchen. According to the tests, the cells are from Mr. Williams' mouth, prosecutors say.Judge Eugene M. Lerner rejected arguments by Mr. Williams' lawyers that the tests took too long and that the results were too unreliable to be used as evidence.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
County prosecutors have dropped drug charges against a man arrested during a police raid, an arrest that was ruled illegal last week by a Howard Circuit Court judge.Gregory Pernel Williams, 25, of Baltimore could have been sentenced to 20 years in prison if he had been convicted of the charges filed after his arrest at the Abbott House apartment building in Columbia on April 15.Friday, prosecutors dropped charges of possession of cocaine, possession of drugs with the intent to distribute, and possession of drugs near a school.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
The Maryland Court of Appeals overturned yesterday the double-murder conviction of Scotland E. Williams, ordering a new trial for the condemned Arnold man in the May 1994 slayings of two prominent Washington lawyers.The state's highest court ruled unanimously that Williams was unfairly convicted last year on charges that he murdered Jose Trias and his wife, Julie Gilbert. The two were found dead in their Annapolis weekend home, hand-cuffed and shot in the head."Mr. Williams is once again presumed to be innocent," said Michael Braudes, a public defender who argued the Williams case before the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | August 18, 1994
A defense attorney questioned yesterday whether Howard County police officers may have violated a judge's order by reviewing a picture of a suspect before testifying at the man's pretrial hearing.Clarke Ahlers of Columbia called five officers to the witness stand at a Howard Circuit Court hearing yesterday, where all testified that they looked at a police photograph of his client before appearing in court.Three officers, Sgt. William McMahon, Detective Michael Ensko and Officer Jeffrey Giroux, testified that they reviewed Mr. Williams' picture before a July 28 hearing -- either at the courthouse or the police station.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
An Ellicott City woman who was legally drunk when she rammed the back of a motorcycle last year, killing its rider, faces no more than a year in prison because of constitutional protections against being charged twice for the same crime. Susan Elizabeth Williams, 35, was convicted yesterday of driving under the influence - the most serious charge that remained in the aftermath of a Howard Circuit judge's decision to dismiss motor vehicle homicide charges related to the Sept. 7 death of Dennis Jerry Sullivan.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
To the dismay of prosecutors, a man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history was freed yesterday of what had been a 22-year sentence for a gun crime and vowed as he walked away from the city's federal courthouse to dedicate his life to serving God. Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, 61, served nearly four years on a handgun possession conviction before his attorney successfully argued that Williams did not meet the technical requirements...
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2001
When Orville Williams was arrested last year on loitering charges, it seemed to be just one of thousands of relatively minor cases brought by Baltimore police. But Williams' case has provoked a legal debate that reaches deeply into Baltimore's roughest neighborhoods and illustrates how police use and, some say, abuse minor ordinances to fight the drug trade. The case also is an example of how an arrest for a seemingly petty crime can lead a man's life to fall apart. Williams, 39, a recovering addict, did what few people in his circumstance do: He pleaded innocent rather than accept a deal in which he would serve no jail time.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
The judge who will decide whether convicted killer Scotland E. Williams should be put to death told prosecutors to bring a Baltimore felon and informant to her Anne Arundel courtroom today so she can find out if prosecutors repeated testimony to him, a possible violation of state court rules.The development threatens to extend the contentious sentencing hearing for the 35-year-old Arnold man into next week.A jury convicted Williams in May of the 1994 murders of two Washington lawyers in their posh weekend home outside Annapolis, and he asked to be sentenced by a judge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
Lawyers defending Scotland E. Williams against double-murder charges started laying the groundwork Friday to try to show that the laboratory that did genetic testing for prosecutors and police had worked on contaminated samples and had tried to hide that from the defense.But the jury in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court also heard from a lab employee that a key piece of evidence -- a drinking glass taken from the victims' Winchester on the Severn home near Annapolis -- had not been contaminated and did show evidence of DNA similar to Williams'.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
The Maryland Court of Appeals overturned yesterday the double-murder conviction of Scotland E. Williams, ordering a new trial for the condemned Arnold man in the May 1994 slayings of two prominent Washington lawyers.The state's highest court ruled unanimously that Williams was unfairly convicted last year on charges that he murdered Jose Trias and his wife, Julie Gilbert. The two were found dead in their Annapolis weekend home overlooking the Severn River, handcuffed and shot in the head.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1993
Unusual, bizarre, tragic -- three little words to describe the case of one Michael Williams, who had the misfortune of being pulled from the relative peace of his prison cell to the courtroom of Baltimore Circuit Judge Kenneth L. Johnson on Oct. 16, 1992.Those are adjectives the Maryland Court of Special Appeals used recently -- in a heretofore unreported opinion -- to describe what happened to this fellow Williams who, as you will see, was in the wrong place at the wrong time, waving his finger in the air."
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
The Maryland Court of Appeals overturned yesterday the double-murder conviction of Scotland E. Williams, ordering a new trial for the condemned Arnold man in the May 1994 slayings of two prominent Washington lawyers.The state's highest court ruled unanimously that Williams was unfairly convicted last year on charges that he murdered Jose Trias and his wife, Julie Gilbert. The two were found dead in their Annapolis weekend home, hand-cuffed and shot in the head."Mr. Williams is once again presumed to be innocent," said Michael Braudes, a public defender who argued the Williams case before the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1995
When Scotland E. Williams goes on trial today on charges of shooting a husband and wife to death in their home last May, prosecutors will have an arsenal of evidence at their fingertips.Williams was videotaped using one victim's bank card. He was arrested wearing the other victim's watch, police say.The prosecution's witness list includes 27 police officers, 11 state and county police lab technicians, six experts from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, three state medical examiners and two privately retained scientists.
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