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NEWS
October 4, 2001
A tour of historic graves in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday inside the gates at Greenmount Avenue and East Oliver Street. Baltimore public school teacher Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk that includes stops at the graves of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth and merchant philanthropists Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt and William Walters. The tour will be repeated each Saturday through the end of the month. The event is held rain or shine. Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling 410-256-2180.
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NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Retired Air Force Col. William Walter M. Deale, a decorated Vietnam War combat pilot who later helped to develop radar systems and the world's fastest jet, died of complications after heart surgery May 21 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 77. Born and raised in Baltimore, Colonel Deale was a 1947 graduate of McDonogh School. After two years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology on a wrestling scholarship, he transferred to the U.S. Naval Academy and graduated in 1953.
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NEWS
May 5, 2000
A tour of historic graves and Victorian monuments in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9: 30 a.m. tomorrow at Greenmount Avenue and Oliver Street. Teacher and historian Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk past the resting places of famous persons, including Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt, John Wilkes Booth and William Walters. The tour will be repeated May 20, May 27 and June 3. The cost is $10 per person. Reservations: 410-256-2180.
NEWS
June 3, 2005
On June 1, 2005, WILLIAM W. WERRING of Baltimore, beloved husband of Mildred L. Werring, devoted father of Linda A. Johnson, Karen L. Dewitt, Kenneth F. and Robert K. Werring. Devoted step-father of Robert Anderson, Karen L. Dewitt, Carolyn Hartis, Richard Hartis, Ronald Hartis, and James Hartis. Also survived by his first wife, Carol Lee Werring, nine grandchildren and ten step-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned Kirkley-Ruddick Funeral Home, P.A., 421 Crain Hwy S.E. Glen Burnie, MD. On Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held at 8:30 P.M. Interment will be private.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | May 2, 1991
Perhaps the most discussed piece in the Walters collection o Asian art is the splendid 18th century "Peach Bloom" vase. Stolen -- and recovered -- in 1988, it sits in its new case in the Chinese Library of Hackerman House, an example of the Ch'ing Dynasty porcelain that alerted Western connoisseurs to the color nuances and modulations that were possible in ceramics.The eight-inch high vase had already acquired a world-class reputation by the time William Walters paid $18,000 for it at a New York auction in 1886, setting a record price for Oriental porcelain.
NEWS
May 24, 1999
William Walters Jr., 75, Bethlehem Steel millwrightWilliam Walters Jr., a retired millwright, died Wednesday of lymphoma at Mercy Medical Center. He was 75 and lived in Baltimore.Mr. Walters joined Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant in 1946 and retired in 1987.Born and raised in Sandtown-Winchester in West Baltimore, he attended city public schools and served in the Army in Europe during World War II.For almost 70 years, he was a member of Ames United Methodist Church in West Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 9, 1999
ALL MY LIFE I've heard stories and tales about William and Henry Walters, Baltimore's father and son art collectors who gave the city its appropriately legendary gallery and collection.As a child, I listened to one of the great Baltimore stories, the lamp that remained perpetually lighted on West Mount Vernon Place. This is the tale of Jennie Walters, the daughter of William Walters, who broke her father's heart. The father kept the light visible in hopes his daughter would return to his side.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 12, 1994
Leon Bonvin's life was short, unhappy and ended with suicide at age 32 in 1866. Forced to work in his father's inn-keeping business, he escaped at dawn and dusk to paint delicate, lovely watercolors of the natural world around the village of Vaugirard near Paris.Largely unappreciated in his lifetime and long forgotten afterward, he found a champion in William Walters, the %o 19th-century collector from Baltimore who spent the Civil War years in Paris. Walters eventually amassed, and the Walters Art Gallery now owns, about 60 works by Bonvin, the world's largest collection.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1999
When William R. Johnston, curator of 18th and 19th century art at the Walters Art Gallery, decided to tell the story of the museum's founders, William and Henry Walters, he had no idea what it would entail.That was 25 years ago -- 25 years in which Johnston read hundreds of history books, perused thousands of pages from inventories or minutes and pored over what surely must have seemed like tens of thousands of footnotes.You see, William and Henry, father and son, were very private people.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | November 5, 1995
WHAT MOTIVATES the passionate collector? Experts say it may be a kind of soul-sickness that springs from loss -- at least that was the suggestion of the panel that convened recently at the Walters Art Gallery to consider the topic "Art Collectors, Forgers and Thieves: What Makes Them Tick?"It was a fascinating discussion made more resonant by the thousands of rare and beautiful objects that shared space with the assembly among the building's grand spaces.One of the panelists was a Walters administrator, another an FBI agent specializing in recovering stolen art.The other two were mental-health professionals, who offered case histories to illustrate their contention that collecting, forging and stealing art works are related, in that all three are forms of compulsive behavior aimed at compensating for past loss or trauma.
NEWS
May 12, 2003
John William Walter, a former district circulation manager for the Baltimore News American, died Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after suffering a heart attack. He was 88 and lived in Northeast Baltimore. Born and raised on Harford Avenue, Mr. Walter attended city public schools and got early preparation for his later career on the delivery side of the news business: As a boy he awoke as early as 3 a.m. to accompany his father, a bread salesman, on his route with a horse and wagon. Mr. Walter started working at the now-defunct News American as a district manager.
NEWS
March 2, 2003
On February 27, 2003, WILLIAM WALTER FARNANDIS, JR., loving husband of Betty Jean Farnandis, beloved father of Anita C. Wilcox, Stephen P. Farnandis, the late James E. and William Walter Farnandis, III. Also survived by four grandchildren and loving brother of Betty Goldstein. Family will receive friends Sunday and Monday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. at THE HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City. A Service will be held on Tuesday 11 A.M. at St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City.
NEWS
October 4, 2001
A tour of historic graves in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday inside the gates at Greenmount Avenue and East Oliver Street. Baltimore public school teacher Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk that includes stops at the graves of Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth and merchant philanthropists Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt and William Walters. The tour will be repeated each Saturday through the end of the month. The event is held rain or shine. Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling 410-256-2180.
NEWS
May 5, 2000
A tour of historic graves and Victorian monuments in Green Mount Cemetery will begin at 9: 30 a.m. tomorrow at Greenmount Avenue and Oliver Street. Teacher and historian Wayne Schaumburg will lead the two-hour walk past the resting places of famous persons, including Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt, John Wilkes Booth and William Walters. The tour will be repeated May 20, May 27 and June 3. The cost is $10 per person. Reservations: 410-256-2180.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1999
When William R. Johnston, curator of 18th and 19th century art at the Walters Art Gallery, decided to tell the story of the museum's founders, William and Henry Walters, he had no idea what it would entail.That was 25 years ago -- 25 years in which Johnston read hundreds of history books, perused thousands of pages from inventories or minutes and pored over what surely must have seemed like tens of thousands of footnotes.You see, William and Henry, father and son, were very private people.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 9, 1999
ALL MY LIFE I've heard stories and tales about William and Henry Walters, Baltimore's father and son art collectors who gave the city its appropriately legendary gallery and collection.As a child, I listened to one of the great Baltimore stories, the lamp that remained perpetually lighted on West Mount Vernon Place. This is the tale of Jennie Walters, the daughter of William Walters, who broke her father's heart. The father kept the light visible in hopes his daughter would return to his side.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | November 9, 1994
Mr. Ian Keownc/o Gourmet Magazine560 Lexington Ave.New York, N.Y. 10022Dear Ian,I've just finished reading your piece on Baltimore in the November issue of Gourmet, and I want to congratulate you for an eye-opening look at this town.In one visit here you found out things that I would never have believed if I hadn't seen them right there in your article.Take Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director David Zinman. Boy, I want an appointment with whomever's been giving Mr. Zinman youth treatments!
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 16, 1992
Even in his own heyday, the late 19th century, when his paintings won highest prizes at international expositions and earned him a knighthood from Queen Victoria, Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema was by no means universally admired.His scenes of everyday life in ancient Rome, furnished with archaeologically correct details and filled with people based on healthy English models, found eager British and American buyers, including William Walters in Baltimore. But Whistler, always ready with the killer quip, dismissed the work as "Five-o'clock-tea antiquity," and Sargent went if possible even further: "It is clever . . . but of course it's not art in any sense whatever."
NEWS
May 24, 1999
William Walters Jr., 75, Bethlehem Steel millwrightWilliam Walters Jr., a retired millwright, died Wednesday of lymphoma at Mercy Medical Center. He was 75 and lived in Baltimore.Mr. Walters joined Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant in 1946 and retired in 1987.Born and raised in Sandtown-Winchester in West Baltimore, he attended city public schools and served in the Army in Europe during World War II.For almost 70 years, he was a member of Ames United Methodist Church in West Baltimore.
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