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William Tecumseh Sherman

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
William Tecumseh Sherman Bricker, a retired Towson lawyer and former chief of the state Motor Vehicle Administration who played a role in strengthening drunken driving laws, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Manor Care Ruxton, a day before his 74th birthday. A descendant of the Civil War's Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, Mr. Bricker was born and raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1945 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His undergraduate studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted by his enlistment in the Army during the Korean War. After earning his bachelor's degree at College Park, Mr. Bricker earned his law degree from the University of Baltimore Law School - and during his last year there worked as assistant director of the state's Unsatisfied Claim and Judgment Fund, predecessor of the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund.
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NEWS
By MIKE PRIDE and MIKE PRIDE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War Charles Bracelen Flood Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 480 pages In the hands of the right author, some moments in American history should cause a reader to tremble in joy and sadness. For me, such an event occurred May 23-24, 1865, when the soldiers of the vast, victorious Union armies paraded before their fellow countrymen one last time before fading into civilian life. This march is the climactic scene in Grant and Sherman, Charles Bracelen Flood's new book about the parallel lives and professional friendship of the North's two greatest generals.
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NEWS
By The (Phoenix) Arizona Republic | October 16, 1990
PREDICTING the future is a job best left to prophets and fortune-tellers. It is a risky business, and is even more so in the Byzantine world of the Middle East.All sorts of fanciful scenarios are being concocted by so-called "military analysts" as to how a U.S.-Iraq battle would unfold. They all end with the U.S. winning a decisive victory with minimal loss of life. But, of all human activities, war is perhaps the least predictable.If war breaks out in Kuwait, this much is certain: It will develop in directions that are utterly unpredictable.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
William Tecumseh Sherman Bricker, a retired Towson lawyer and former chief of the state Motor Vehicle Administration who played a role in strengthening drunken driving laws, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Manor Care Ruxton, a day before his 74th birthday. A descendant of the Civil War's Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, Mr. Bricker was born and raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1945 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. His undergraduate studies at the University of Maryland were interrupted by his enlistment in the Army during the Korean War. After earning his bachelor's degree at College Park, Mr. Bricker earned his law degree from the University of Baltimore Law School - and during his last year there worked as assistant director of the state's Unsatisfied Claim and Judgment Fund, predecessor of the Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund.
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | November 15, 1998
ATLANTA -- There are three kinds of people here who worry about Tom Wolfe's new novel of Atlanta, "A Man in Full."1) People who read the book for the fun of it.2) People who worry about what Mr. Wolfe will say about their city, whether he will misunderstand, or, worse yet, understand.3) People who worry that if they carp, Mr. Wolfe will retaliate in a subsequent magazine article. He has ways of getting back few of us can even conceive.The category 2 worriers, who fret over atmospherics, are in a state of fretful suspension.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 11, 1995
"David Broder: The Senate is now working on Contract items, and they don't seem to be doing very well. Did the House just overreach, or what is the problem?"Newt Gingrich: No, there's not a -- I don't know that there's a problem. I mean, this is about -- this is the American system. The fact is the Founding Fathers designed the House to run every two years. It is a -- somebody -- there was an analogy once that the House was a hot cup of coffee, and the Senate is the saucer that you pour it in to cool.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 6, 1994
WANT TO HEAR 14 reasons why we won WW II (the Big One)? Listen to Rosemary Clooney's CD, "For the Duration."She sings some of the songs that Americans sang back then -- songs that bathed wartime in a rosy glow that hid the grim and bloody reality of such events as D-Day. No pun on Rosemary. I mean "rosy" in the sense of optimism and romance.That's true not only of such ballads as "I Don't Want To Walk Without You, Baby"; "These Foolish Things Remind Me of You"; "I'll Walk Alone"; and such ditties as "They're Either Too Young or Too Old"; "Saturday Night Is the Loneliest Night of the Week."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 13, 1991
"DEAR Emory Alumnus/a, These days of political unrest around the globe have demonstrated again how events in one nation can reorder the political and social dynamics by which the rest of the world operates."So began a letter I received from "Sam Nunn, '61C-'62L, Honorary National Chair" of Emory's new fund-raising drive. It was written just after political unrest in the Persian Gulf reordered his political dynamics. And when I say "reordered" I mean re-ordered! In August he was the leading conservative Democratic presidential contender.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 16, 1991
AFTER QUOTING Sam Nunn about his "Sherman-like statement" lastWednesday, I advertised a column for today proving Sherman didn't mean it.Here is that column. Sort of.William Tecumseh Sherman was the most popular Civil War veteran of them all, U. S. Grant included. Grant became president after the war, and his reputation suffered as scandal piled upon scandal.Sherman became what would today be called chief of staff of the Army. His reputation rose ever higher. Both parties kept begging him to run for president.
NEWS
By MIKE PRIDE and MIKE PRIDE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War Charles Bracelen Flood Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 480 pages In the hands of the right author, some moments in American history should cause a reader to tremble in joy and sadness. For me, such an event occurred May 23-24, 1865, when the soldiers of the vast, victorious Union armies paraded before their fellow countrymen one last time before fading into civilian life. This march is the climactic scene in Grant and Sherman, Charles Bracelen Flood's new book about the parallel lives and professional friendship of the North's two greatest generals.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 27, 2001
"I fear the world will jump to the wrong conclusion that because I am in Atlanta the work is done. Far from it. We must kill those three hundred thousand I have told you of so often, and the further they run the harder for us to get them." - Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, 1864 WASHINGTON - America's Civil War provides many analogies by which we measure - and sometimes misunderstand - today's military developments and American ways of waging war. Because facets of the Afghanistan operations - real-time intelligence, stealthy aircraft, precision munitions - are so modern, we miss the fact that the war requires an American tradition of war-making that has a 19th-century pedigree.
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | November 15, 1998
ATLANTA -- There are three kinds of people here who worry about Tom Wolfe's new novel of Atlanta, "A Man in Full."1) People who read the book for the fun of it.2) People who worry about what Mr. Wolfe will say about their city, whether he will misunderstand, or, worse yet, understand.3) People who worry that if they carp, Mr. Wolfe will retaliate in a subsequent magazine article. He has ways of getting back few of us can even conceive.The category 2 worriers, who fret over atmospherics, are in a state of fretful suspension.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 11, 1995
"David Broder: The Senate is now working on Contract items, and they don't seem to be doing very well. Did the House just overreach, or what is the problem?"Newt Gingrich: No, there's not a -- I don't know that there's a problem. I mean, this is about -- this is the American system. The fact is the Founding Fathers designed the House to run every two years. It is a -- somebody -- there was an analogy once that the House was a hot cup of coffee, and the Senate is the saucer that you pour it in to cool.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 6, 1994
WANT TO HEAR 14 reasons why we won WW II (the Big One)? Listen to Rosemary Clooney's CD, "For the Duration."She sings some of the songs that Americans sang back then -- songs that bathed wartime in a rosy glow that hid the grim and bloody reality of such events as D-Day. No pun on Rosemary. I mean "rosy" in the sense of optimism and romance.That's true not only of such ballads as "I Don't Want To Walk Without You, Baby"; "These Foolish Things Remind Me of You"; "I'll Walk Alone"; and such ditties as "They're Either Too Young or Too Old"; "Saturday Night Is the Loneliest Night of the Week."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 16, 1991
AFTER QUOTING Sam Nunn about his "Sherman-like statement" lastWednesday, I advertised a column for today proving Sherman didn't mean it.Here is that column. Sort of.William Tecumseh Sherman was the most popular Civil War veteran of them all, U. S. Grant included. Grant became president after the war, and his reputation suffered as scandal piled upon scandal.Sherman became what would today be called chief of staff of the Army. His reputation rose ever higher. Both parties kept begging him to run for president.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 13, 1991
"DEAR Emory Alumnus/a, These days of political unrest around the globe have demonstrated again how events in one nation can reorder the political and social dynamics by which the rest of the world operates."So began a letter I received from "Sam Nunn, '61C-'62L, Honorary National Chair" of Emory's new fund-raising drive. It was written just after political unrest in the Persian Gulf reordered his political dynamics. And when I say "reordered" I mean re-ordered! In August he was the leading conservative Democratic presidential contender.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 27, 2001
"I fear the world will jump to the wrong conclusion that because I am in Atlanta the work is done. Far from it. We must kill those three hundred thousand I have told you of so often, and the further they run the harder for us to get them." - Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, 1864 WASHINGTON - America's Civil War provides many analogies by which we measure - and sometimes misunderstand - today's military developments and American ways of waging war. Because facets of the Afghanistan operations - real-time intelligence, stealthy aircraft, precision munitions - are so modern, we miss the fact that the war requires an American tradition of war-making that has a 19th-century pedigree.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 25, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election. The 25th in 1884 saw the first Democratic victory in 28 years. New York Gov. Grover Cleveland, a sound-money conservative, led the party out of its wilderness.This was the election in which war hero William Tecumseh Sherman told Republicans he would not accept the nomination, nor serve if elected. So the party turned to Maine Sen. James G. Blaine, a veteran of Congress and Cabinet for over 20 years. Cleveland had never even been to Washington.The campaign turned on personal issues.
NEWS
By The (Phoenix) Arizona Republic | October 16, 1990
PREDICTING the future is a job best left to prophets and fortune-tellers. It is a risky business, and is even more so in the Byzantine world of the Middle East.All sorts of fanciful scenarios are being concocted by so-called "military analysts" as to how a U.S.-Iraq battle would unfold. They all end with the U.S. winning a decisive victory with minimal loss of life. But, of all human activities, war is perhaps the least predictable.If war breaks out in Kuwait, this much is certain: It will develop in directions that are utterly unpredictable.
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