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William Styron

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NEWS
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2006
William Styron, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist whose skillful explorations of the themes of evil, domination and redemption made him one of the finest writers of his generation, died yesterday afternoon. He was 81. Mr. Styron, the author of The Confessions of Nat Turner, Sophie's Choice and Lie Down in Darkness, died of pneumonia at Martha's Vineyard Hospital in Massachusetts, according to a daughter, Alexandra Styron. In addition to his literary skills, Mr. Styron also became well-known because of his public battle with severe depression.
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NEWS
November 2, 2006
NATIONAL Novelist William Styron dies William Styron, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist whose explorations of the darkest corners of the human mind and experience were charged by his own near-suicidal demons, died yesterday in Martha's Vineyard, Mass. He was 81. pg 1a Pentagon begins PR effort As concern in the Defense Department mounts over increasingly negative coverage of the Iraq war, the Pentagon has launched a rapid-response public relations effort to rebut news stories that officials believe are inaccurate or misleading.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and By Michael Pakenham,Sun Book Editor | April 21, 2002
William Styron, one of a tiny handful of undisputedly great living novelists writing in English, is by nature and habit a private man. But this Wednesday, he is scheduled to speak in Baltimore as the very public warrior- knight of melancholia, marking 13 years of his battle to wrench the illness known as depression from the dragons of ignorance, scorn and negligence. Styron will be the featured speaker at the 16th annual symposium of the Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA)
NEWS
By Martin Miller and Martin Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2006
William Styron, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist whose skillful explorations of the themes of evil, domination and redemption made him one of the finest writers of his generation, died yesterday afternoon. He was 81. Mr. Styron, the author of The Confessions of Nat Turner, Sophie's Choice and Lie Down in Darkness, died of pneumonia at Martha's Vineyard Hospital in Massachusetts, according to a daughter, Alexandra Styron. In addition to his literary skills, Mr. Styron also became well-known because of his public battle with severe depression.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 9, 2002
LONDON -The sheer magnitude of the Holocaust is hard to absorb, but when that whole, hideous chapter of inhuman history gets broken down from the millions of victims to its component parts of innocent, individual lives, the truth and the pain that suffuse it become all too clear. William Styron got at that truth and that pain in his novel Sophie's Choice, about one Catholic Polish woman's unspeakable experience at Auschwitz and her fleeting taste of happiness afterward. The book, which subsequently became a substantial film, has now been transformed by British-born, Maryland-based Nicholas Maw into an uncompromising, involving, disturbing, often achingly beautiful opera.
SPORTS
March 31, 2001
Founded: 1838 Location: Durham, N.C. Enrollment: 6,368 undergraduates Tuition and fees: $25,630 Famous alumni: Former American Red Cross president Elizabeth Dole; CNN anchorwoman Judy Woodruff; NBA player Grant Hill of the Orlando Magic; novelists Anne Tyler, Reynolds Price and William Styron. Academic ranking: No. 8 among national universities, according to U.S. News & World Report School colors: Royal blue and white Nickname: Blue Devils, after an Alpine unit of French soldiers noted for their courage in World War I. Last trip to Final Four: 1999 NCAA basketball titles: Two, 1991, 1992
NEWS
November 2, 2006
NATIONAL Novelist William Styron dies William Styron, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist whose explorations of the darkest corners of the human mind and experience were charged by his own near-suicidal demons, died yesterday in Martha's Vineyard, Mass. He was 81. pg 1a Pentagon begins PR effort As concern in the Defense Department mounts over increasingly negative coverage of the Iraq war, the Pentagon has launched a rapid-response public relations effort to rebut news stories that officials believe are inaccurate or misleading.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 26, 1994
The "naked" in "Naked of New York" is the nakedness of power. Here's a callow, unformed, infernally precious movie that has a cast far better than it deserves -- Kathleen Turner, Timothy Dalton, Eric Stoltz, Mary-Louise Parker, even, for crying out loud, William Styron. What is going on? Could it be . . . SATAN?Actually, no: it's the powerful producer-director Martin Scorsese, serving as executive producer to Dan Algrant's meek little autobiographical tale about a wannabe playwright struggling for attention in Manhattan.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 10, 1995
Many a school child learned the footnotes of Maryland history from a large map the Pratt Library still keeps in print.It was artist Edwin Tunis who drew this grand plan of the state more than 60 years ago. I should have guessed that someone with his talent would have lived in Baltimore's Windsor Hills neighborhood.To celebrate this remarkable community's 100th anniversary, residents have issued a handsome new book, a people history.The book is called "Windsor Hills: A Century of History." It has an oblong format, is 55 pages long and must be the only community text that devotes four pages to residents' books and scholarly articles.
FEATURES
By Clifford Terry and Clifford Terry,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 1993
CHICAGO -- It was a time, it seems in hazy retrospect, of sweet simplicity -- lemonade on the porch, hammocks in the trees and virginity past 14 -- a time when the only crack was the one in the sidewalk you stepped over to avoid breaking your mother's back.It was the time of the '50s, and for six seasons and 234 episodes, a time for a TV series that now seems to have typified Eisenhower-era innocence. A sitcom of white-bread sensibility, "Leave It to Beaver" was, gee, kinda neat, even though that creep, Eddie Haskell, sometimes made things pretty lousy for the Beav and junk like that.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 9, 2002
LONDON -The sheer magnitude of the Holocaust is hard to absorb, but when that whole, hideous chapter of inhuman history gets broken down from the millions of victims to its component parts of innocent, individual lives, the truth and the pain that suffuse it become all too clear. William Styron got at that truth and that pain in his novel Sophie's Choice, about one Catholic Polish woman's unspeakable experience at Auschwitz and her fleeting taste of happiness afterward. The book, which subsequently became a substantial film, has now been transformed by British-born, Maryland-based Nicholas Maw into an uncompromising, involving, disturbing, often achingly beautiful opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and By Michael Pakenham,Sun Book Editor | April 21, 2002
William Styron, one of a tiny handful of undisputedly great living novelists writing in English, is by nature and habit a private man. But this Wednesday, he is scheduled to speak in Baltimore as the very public warrior- knight of melancholia, marking 13 years of his battle to wrench the illness known as depression from the dragons of ignorance, scorn and negligence. Styron will be the featured speaker at the 16th annual symposium of the Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association (DRADA)
SPORTS
March 31, 2001
Founded: 1838 Location: Durham, N.C. Enrollment: 6,368 undergraduates Tuition and fees: $25,630 Famous alumni: Former American Red Cross president Elizabeth Dole; CNN anchorwoman Judy Woodruff; NBA player Grant Hill of the Orlando Magic; novelists Anne Tyler, Reynolds Price and William Styron. Academic ranking: No. 8 among national universities, according to U.S. News & World Report School colors: Royal blue and white Nickname: Blue Devils, after an Alpine unit of French soldiers noted for their courage in World War I. Last trip to Final Four: 1999 NCAA basketball titles: Two, 1991, 1992
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | November 3, 1995
PHOTO OPS don't come much better than this. Tipper Gore, the vice president's photo-friendly wife, is feeding soup to Head Start kids in East Baltimore after reading them a book called "Stone Soup," a children's classic about a community coming together to feed the hungry.You don't get by in the helping biz without photo ops. Loosened heart strings, after all, lead directly to loosened change purses.Gore says all the right things (nothing, for instance, about rock lyrics). In an interview, she takes the theme of the book and applies it to Congress, the people who don't seem as eager to feed the hungry anymore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 10, 1995
Many a school child learned the footnotes of Maryland history from a large map the Pratt Library still keeps in print.It was artist Edwin Tunis who drew this grand plan of the state more than 60 years ago. I should have guessed that someone with his talent would have lived in Baltimore's Windsor Hills neighborhood.To celebrate this remarkable community's 100th anniversary, residents have issued a handsome new book, a people history.The book is called "Windsor Hills: A Century of History." It has an oblong format, is 55 pages long and must be the only community text that devotes four pages to residents' books and scholarly articles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 26, 1994
The "naked" in "Naked of New York" is the nakedness of power. Here's a callow, unformed, infernally precious movie that has a cast far better than it deserves -- Kathleen Turner, Timothy Dalton, Eric Stoltz, Mary-Louise Parker, even, for crying out loud, William Styron. What is going on? Could it be . . . SATAN?Actually, no: it's the powerful producer-director Martin Scorsese, serving as executive producer to Dan Algrant's meek little autobiographical tale about a wannabe playwright struggling for attention in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1993
The three stories of William Styron's "A Tidewater Morning" were published separately over nine years in Esquire; the first appearing in 1978, the last in 1987. Perhaps only now, collected in a single volume, can we see how rich and remarkable they are.Mr. Styron has not published much since "Sophie's Choice" 14 years ago. There was a collection of essays, and a brief, lucid account of an episode of clinical depression. To revive three old short stories might be taken as a minor tidying on behalf of a remarkable but never prolific writer.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | November 3, 1995
PHOTO OPS don't come much better than this. Tipper Gore, the vice president's photo-friendly wife, is feeding soup to Head Start kids in East Baltimore after reading them a book called "Stone Soup," a children's classic about a community coming together to feed the hungry.You don't get by in the helping biz without photo ops. Loosened heart strings, after all, lead directly to loosened change purses.Gore says all the right things (nothing, for instance, about rock lyrics). In an interview, she takes the theme of the book and applies it to Congress, the people who don't seem as eager to feed the hungry anymore.
FEATURES
By Richard Eder and Richard Eder,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 1993
The three stories of William Styron's "A Tidewater Morning" were published separately over nine years in Esquire; the first appearing in 1978, the last in 1987. Perhaps only now, collected in a single volume, can we see how rich and remarkable they are.Mr. Styron has not published much since "Sophie's Choice" 14 years ago. There was a collection of essays, and a brief, lucid account of an episode of clinical depression. To revive three old short stories might be taken as a minor tidying on behalf of a remarkable but never prolific writer.
FEATURES
By Clifford Terry and Clifford Terry,Chicago Tribune | August 1, 1993
CHICAGO -- It was a time, it seems in hazy retrospect, of sweet simplicity -- lemonade on the porch, hammocks in the trees and virginity past 14 -- a time when the only crack was the one in the sidewalk you stepped over to avoid breaking your mother's back.It was the time of the '50s, and for six seasons and 234 episodes, a time for a TV series that now seems to have typified Eisenhower-era innocence. A sitcom of white-bread sensibility, "Leave It to Beaver" was, gee, kinda neat, even though that creep, Eddie Haskell, sometimes made things pretty lousy for the Beav and junk like that.
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