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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Captain Kirk himself will beam into Baltimore this summer to appear at the Shore Leave science fiction convention in Hunt Valley, according to the event's website. The 35th annual convention will offer writing workshops, panel discussions, role playing games and a chance to meet authors and stars. Shatner, who has been known to turn down much bigger gigs, is a major score -- particularly for a convention founded by folks brought together by a love of "Star Trek. " He will appear Aug. 3. If fans want his autograph, or to take a picture with Shatner, they'll have to open their wallets.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
For years, William Shatner wanted no part of the convention scene, had no desire to appear in front of the Trekkies, fanboys and obsessive sci-fi geeks who all craved a piece of Capt. James Tiberius Kirk. "That's very true," says Shatner, whose stance was perfectly captured in a 1986 "Saturday Night Live" skit, in which he urged a convention of costumed "Star Trek" fans to "get a life, will you, people!" But that was then. Today, Shatner is at peace with Captain Kirk - and, more important, with Captain Kirk's fans.
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By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | November 20, 1994
When William Shatner's name scrolled across the screen at the New York premiere of "Star Trek Generations," a round of cheers was immediately followed by a groundswell of boos -- the only emotion displayed during the title sequence by an audience of journalists, filmmakers and Trekkies.British actor Malcolm McDowell, whose villain causes the demise of Mr. Shatner's Captain Kirk, collared Mr. Shatner the next morning and gleefully noted how fascinating it was "that 50 percent of the audience love you, and the other 50 percentare so bloody tired of you after 30 years they just want to see you die."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Captain Kirk himself will beam into Baltimore this summer to appear at the Shore Leave science fiction convention in Hunt Valley, according to the event's website. The 35th annual convention will offer writing workshops, panel discussions, role playing games and a chance to meet authors and stars. Shatner, who has been known to turn down much bigger gigs, is a major score -- particularly for a convention founded by folks brought together by a love of "Star Trek. " He will appear Aug. 3. If fans want his autograph, or to take a picture with Shatner, they'll have to open their wallets.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
For years, William Shatner wanted no part of the convention scene, had no desire to appear in front of the Trekkies, fanboys and obsessive sci-fi geeks who all craved a piece of Capt. James Tiberius Kirk. "That's very true," says Shatner, whose stance was perfectly captured in a 1986 "Saturday Night Live" skit, in which he urged a convention of costumed "Star Trek" fans to "get a life, will you, people!" But that was then. Today, Shatner is at peace with Captain Kirk - and, more important, with Captain Kirk's fans.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
Spock's ears always got the press. Many scoffed at those Vulcan ears -- save the occasional space babe who was very interested in Spock's ears. But that's another story.This story is about James T. Kirk's ears. Ears that have made Kirk -- still going by the name William Shatner -- a patient at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Who knew? Then, Kirk has this doctor's appointment in Baltimore on FridayMr. Shatner is one of 40 million Americans who suffer from tinnitus, a disorder that causes a constant ringing or buzzing sound in the ears.
FEATURES
February 28, 2006
Critic's Pick-- As his wife files for annulment and half his cash, Denny (William Shatner, above) sweats in Boston Legal (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Rarely have critters frolicked more hilariously than in Over the Hedge, a movie that should amuse all but the newborn or dead. This first animated release from the marriage of DreamWorks and Paramount has animals that will appeal to the young, humor that will appeal to adolescents, tongue-in-cheek sophistication that will endear itself to adults and an appreciation of its animated predecessors that should warm the hearts of veteran moviegoers. Over the Hedge (DreamWorks) Starring the voices of Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 6, 2002
National Grand Prix officials said yesterday at a Washington news conference that the Kennedy Krieger Institute of Baltimore, an international center for children with autism, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities, is the official charity of the inaugural race, July 19-21 on the grounds of RFK Stadium. The 40,000 reserved grandstand seats and 35,000 general admission tickets for the Grand Prix weekend go on sale today at 10 a.m. The Grand Prix includes races in the American Le Mans, Trans-Am and World Challenge GT Series, a pro-celebrity race that includes Timothy Dalton (a former James Bond)
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
The ABC lawyer drama Boston Legal ends its run tonight with a two-hour finale focused on the characters of Alan Shore (James Spader) and Denny Crane (William Shatner) - and that's as it should be. I am not sure this series had soul, but they certainly formed the heart of it. In so doing, they became one of the more intelligent, engaging, off-beat and enduring professional couples on TV. Beyond unique and brilliant performances by Shatner and Spader, the series also boasted some of the finest writing on network TV, thanks to creator and executive producer David E. Kelley.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Yesterday, when  a story came across the desk with spokesperson in it and I let it go through, I checked the Associated Press Stylebook , and, sure enough, the fossil prohibition against the word is still in the 2011 edition. The editors might change their tune for the 2012 edition, but I doubt it. They cling lovingly to unexamined preferences. I tweeted some advice, "The Associated Press Stylebook continues its fuddy-duddy prohibition of 'spokesperson.' Suggest you ignore it. #ignoreAP," which I would like to expand on here.  Spokesperson has a 1972 citation from the Guardian as the earliest mention in the Oxford English Dictionary . There's also a 1976 citation from The New Yorker , and pray recall that that would be the old New Yorker , under Mr. Shawn's discriminating eye. The word has been around for forty years and can hardly be thought to be a neologism.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Lee Boyd Malvo is claiming that he and fellow Beltway sniper John Allen Muhammad lined up co-conspirators to broaden the campaign of violence that paralyzed the Washington region eight years ago, but that the collaborators backed away, according to a television interview. Malvo also claimed responsibility for 42 shootings, many more than he and Muhammad had been linked to, according to a forensic psychiatrist who interviewed the man, now 25. The revelations were greeted skeptically by lawyers involved in the case that shook the region in 2002.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
The ABC lawyer drama Boston Legal ends its run tonight with a two-hour finale focused on the characters of Alan Shore (James Spader) and Denny Crane (William Shatner) - and that's as it should be. I am not sure this series had soul, but they certainly formed the heart of it. In so doing, they became one of the more intelligent, engaging, off-beat and enduring professional couples on TV. Beyond unique and brilliant performances by Shatner and Spader, the series also boasted some of the finest writing on network TV, thanks to creator and executive producer David E. Kelley.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Rarely have critters frolicked more hilariously than in Over the Hedge, a movie that should amuse all but the newborn or dead. This first animated release from the marriage of DreamWorks and Paramount has animals that will appeal to the young, humor that will appeal to adolescents, tongue-in-cheek sophistication that will endear itself to adults and an appreciation of its animated predecessors that should warm the hearts of veteran moviegoers. Over the Hedge (DreamWorks) Starring the voices of Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner.
FEATURES
February 28, 2006
Critic's Pick-- As his wife files for annulment and half his cash, Denny (William Shatner, above) sweats in Boston Legal (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Neil and Dan Neil,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2004
I confess, I am a partisan. I have followed William Shatner's career with the kind of avidity that results in restraining orders. My God, Jim, I've read the man's books - not just the TekWar series but also the two Star Trek memoirs, which recount his days playing James Tiberius Kirk in TV and film. I've watched every frame of Shatner celluloid I could find, including his 1965 horror film Incubus, the only movie ever made in Esperanto, the cinematic version of the Enterprise's universal translator.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Two good geography lessons -- about the American West and Africa's river Nile -- compete on broadcast and cable in a night that also brings back "Columbo."* "The American Experience: The Way West" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, channels 22, 67) -- The first of a two-part series from producer Ric Burns (brother of Ken of "Baseball" and "The Civil War" fame) features a couple of local links: narrator Russell Baker, who grew up in Baltimore and who began his career at The Sun, and Goucher College history professor Julie Jeffrey, who is interviewed for her expertise in the female experience of the old frontier.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 20, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* "Alex, what is the queen city of the Patapsco drainage basin?"The answer is Baltimore, of course, which is one of the categories scheduled on tonight's edition of "Jeopardy!" at 7:30 p.m. on WMAR-Channel 2, with host Alex Trebek. As a promotional gimmick called "Bringin' It Home," the show highlights numerous geographical categories and alerts stations therein to plug the local angle.(By the way, Media Monitor borrowed the Charm City description above from the departed Maryland Public Television series, "Crabs")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 10, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - The day before James Spader won an Emmy for his portrayal of Alan Shore, the morally dubious lawyer on The Practice, the actor was at the Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden at the University of California, Los Angeles, admiring the statues - especially the female forms. "Look at the beautiful curve of her back, right at the base of her spine," he said, noticing a dancer at the top of Robert Graham's Dance Columns. "It's the most perfect curve in nature." James Spader, network TV star: To anyone familiar with the 44-year-old actor and his work, it sounds almost absurd.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 6, 2002
National Grand Prix officials said yesterday at a Washington news conference that the Kennedy Krieger Institute of Baltimore, an international center for children with autism, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities, is the official charity of the inaugural race, July 19-21 on the grounds of RFK Stadium. The 40,000 reserved grandstand seats and 35,000 general admission tickets for the Grand Prix weekend go on sale today at 10 a.m. The Grand Prix includes races in the American Le Mans, Trans-Am and World Challenge GT Series, a pro-celebrity race that includes Timothy Dalton (a former James Bond)
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