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By Los Angeles Times | February 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- William Schuman, one of the most influential figures in American music in the past 50 years, died Saturday at 81.Mr. Schuman won two Pulitzer Prizes for his compositions, including the first Pulitzer ever awarded for music. He also was the president of the Juilliard School of Music during its greatest period of growth after World War II; was president of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts from its opening day in 1962 until 1969; and was instrumental in the creation of the Juilliard String Quartet, the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the New York Film Festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 2001
Schubert Schubert Lieder, Volume II. Ian Bostridge, tenor; Julius Drake, pianist. (EMI Classics 57141) Baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau redefined and re-energized the art of singing lieder (German songs) for the 20th century; tenor Ian Bostridge is doing the same for the 21st. To begin with, Bostridge has the unmistakable soul of a musical poet, which makes him an ideal champion of a genre that needs all the support it can get these days. When Bostridge sings, words and music seem to come from somewhere deep within, not from the black and white pages of a score.
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NEWS
February 22, 1992
Non-music lovers may have been puzzled by news of the recent death of composer William Schuman. They were probably thinking of Robert Schumann (1810-1856), the German Romantic composer, music critic and mentor to Brahms. Yet William Schuman (1912-1992) occupied a comparable place in American musical history: He was among this century's most important composers of the modern American school. As a teacher and arts administrator, he was one of the most influential voices on the U.S. cultural scene.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 1997
Concert information published with the article on David Zinman in yesterday's Today section indicated that Goldmark's "Rustic Wedding Symphony" would be performed at all Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concerts this weekend. Tomorrow's 11 a.m. concert will not feature Goldmark but will feature Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 1. Tonight's concert features both. Call 410-783-8000 for more information.The Sun regrets the error.David Zinman's final season at the Baltimore Symphony, which begins tonight in Meyerhoff Hall, is filled with music he has never had the chance to perform here -- or, for that matter, anywhere else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 26, 2001
Schubert Schubert Lieder, Volume II. Ian Bostridge, tenor; Julius Drake, pianist. (EMI Classics 57141) Baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau redefined and re-energized the art of singing lieder (German songs) for the 20th century; tenor Ian Bostridge is doing the same for the 21st. To begin with, Bostridge has the unmistakable soul of a musical poet, which makes him an ideal champion of a genre that needs all the support it can get these days. When Bostridge sings, words and music seem to come from somewhere deep within, not from the black and white pages of a score.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 1997
Concert information published with the article on David Zinman in yesterday's Today section indicated that Goldmark's "Rustic Wedding Symphony" would be performed at all Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concerts this weekend. Tomorrow's 11 a.m. concert will not feature Goldmark but will feature Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 1. Tonight's concert features both. Call 410-783-8000 for more information.The Sun regrets the error.David Zinman's final season at the Baltimore Symphony, which begins tonight in Meyerhoff Hall, is filled with music he has never had the chance to perform here -- or, for that matter, anywhere else.
NEWS
By GORDON C. CYR | April 10, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, have done me the great honor of premiering my second symphony at their concerts Thursday, Friday and Saturday.Unlike my first symphony, which was composed for the American Camerata for New Music -- a smaller orchestra specializing in the performance of difficult contemporary scores -- my second attempt was undertaken with the BSO in mind. This work, then, is designed for a large orchestra of high quality, used to performing a wide range of repertory, and for which efficient use of costly rehearsal time is an absolute given.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
On September 13, 2004, RONALD J., beloved son of Eleanor May Schuman and the late Rufus Gyrel Thomas; beloved husband of Kari Elizabeth Thomas (nee Criswell); beloved father of Dalton W. Erichsen Thomas; brother of David A. Cullum, Debra A. Noel, Patrick T. Bley, and the late Gerald L. Thomas; stepbrother of Marie Schuman and William Schuman, Jr. Also survived by several nephews and a niece. Services at Christ Lutheran Church, Upperco, on Saturday at 12 noon. Interment will take place in the church cemetery.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 22, 1993
One of this area's most prestigious concert series begins tonight at Alumni Hall as the U.S. Naval Academy's Distinguished Artist Series begins its 1993-1994 season with a performance by the young American violinist Robert McDuffie.Mr. McDuffie has performed as soloist with such ensembles as the Chicago Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Orchestra Teatro La Scala. His recording of Leonard Bernstein's "Serenade" and William Schuman's Violin Concerto was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1990 and remains one of the most engaging recordings of American music to have been issued in recent years.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 1997
Anne Arundel Community College continues the celebration of its 35th anniversary with concerts this weekend and May 11.The Concert Choir will present a varied program called "Swing Into Spring" at 7: 30 p.m. Saturday at the Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. Conductor Terrence Greenawalt will lead the 40-voice choir, which includes students and community members, in a program dominated by the music of George Gershwin.Selections from "Porgy and Bess" will be performed with Alfred McEwen as Porgy, Marilyn Gaver as Bess and James Ballard as Sportin' Life.
NEWS
By GORDON C. CYR | April 10, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, have done me the great honor of premiering my second symphony at their concerts Thursday, Friday and Saturday.Unlike my first symphony, which was composed for the American Camerata for New Music -- a smaller orchestra specializing in the performance of difficult contemporary scores -- my second attempt was undertaken with the BSO in mind. This work, then, is designed for a large orchestra of high quality, used to performing a wide range of repertory, and for which efficient use of costly rehearsal time is an absolute given.
NEWS
February 22, 1992
Non-music lovers may have been puzzled by news of the recent death of composer William Schuman. They were probably thinking of Robert Schumann (1810-1856), the German Romantic composer, music critic and mentor to Brahms. Yet William Schuman (1912-1992) occupied a comparable place in American musical history: He was among this century's most important composers of the modern American school. As a teacher and arts administrator, he was one of the most influential voices on the U.S. cultural scene.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- William Schuman, one of the most influential figures in American music in the past 50 years, died Saturday at 81.Mr. Schuman won two Pulitzer Prizes for his compositions, including the first Pulitzer ever awarded for music. He also was the president of the Juilliard School of Music during its greatest period of growth after World War II; was president of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts from its opening day in 1962 until 1969; and was instrumental in the creation of the Juilliard String Quartet, the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the New York Film Festival.
FEATURES
By John von Rhein and John von Rhein,Chicago Tribune | November 14, 1990
The music world has always prized its elder statesmen, though seldom when they were alive and functioning and able to appreciate the attention.Our need for such father-figures has perhaps never been greater than at present, when there are so few around. Among the senior American composers, Leonard Bernstein and Virgil Thomson are both gone. Elliott Carter, still active at 81, and William Schuman, 80, are respected figures, although neither precisely qualifies as a household eminence.That leaves Aaron Copland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Gertrude R. Schuman, a retired hospital seamstress, died Friday of cancer at Harbor Hospital Center. She was 90 and a resident of Christ Church Harbor Apartments.Known as "Miss Gert," Mrs. Schuman, with her carefully coiffed hair, was a familiar figure in southern Baltimore, where she had lived all her life.She had worked as a seamstress in the laundry room of the old South Baltimore General Hospital, now Harbor Hospital, where she repaired sheets, pillowcases, towels and interns' uniforms from 1967 until retiring in 1975.
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