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By Ray Jenkins | December 31, 1991
TWO WEEKS before Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as president of the Soviet Union, New York Times columnist William Safire opened his column with the following sentence:"Revealing the true colors of a tyrant, Mikhail Gorbachev now seeks to thwart the democratic will of the independent republics his former empire by bidding for the support of the veteran Red Army generals." The ostensible basis for this arrant nonsense was the fact that Gorbachev had held meetings with his military commanders. By that criterion, Safire as easily could have written that George Bush was plotting to become a "tyrant" for meeting with Gen. Colin Powell.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Scandalmonger," by William Safire. Simon & Schuster. 496 pages. $27. George Washington, portrayed in "Scandalmonger" as a hypocrite who likely defrauded the federal government, actually gets off easy. Other American icons, notably Thomas Jefferson (an "atheist and fanatic") and Alexander Hamilton (an "illegitimate brat") are cheerfully swiped off their pedestals in William Safire's latest historical novel, and tossed into a rollicking political saga in which revered Founding Fathers behave pretty much like, well, President Clinton.
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FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | November 2, 1992
No one said being a Joban was going to be easy."The Joban life is the life spent maintaining personal convictions," William Safire writes in his newly published book, "The First Dissident: The Book of Job in Today's Politics."And here it was on a Wednesday, less than a week before Election Day, and he was doing what any number of good citizens have done recently: Discussing who would get his vote for president.The problem was that Mr. Safire, the influential political columnist for the New York Times, had peeked behind Door No. 1, Door No. 2 and Door No. 3, and hadn't liked any of the choices.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 4, 1998
Inhibited writers and cowering English students can relax.It is now officially safe to selectively split infinitives. The newest "A Dictionary of Modern American Usage" from the prestigious Oxford University Press says so.Some of the nation's sterner English teachers -- you know who they are -- might be appalled, but most grammar observers -- including William Safire -- seem to accept it.Zarina Hock, managing editor for books at the 90,000-member National Council...
NEWS
By Jesse E. Todd Jr | January 21, 1996
WHILE I ABHOR violence, the idea of President Clinton punching New York Times columnist William Safire in the nose does have some appeal. Mr. Safire has called Hillary Rodham Clinton "a congenital liar" regarding Watergate -- I'm sorry, that was the affair of Mr. Safire's former boss, Richard Nixon; I meant Whitewater -- and Mr. Clinton is alleged by his spokesman to have refrained from a pugilistic response to this insult only because he is, after all,...
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 4, 1998
Inhibited writers and cowering English students can relax.It is now officially safe to selectively split infinitives. The newest "A Dictionary of Modern American Usage" from the prestigious Oxford University Press says so.Some of the nation's sterner English teachers -- you know who they are -- might be appalled, but most grammar observers -- including William Safire -- seem to accept it.Zarina Hock, managing editor for books at the 90,000-member National Council...
NEWS
By Nicholas Lemann | November 16, 1992
THE FIRST DISSIDENT: THE BOOK OF JOB IN TODAY'S POLITICS. By William Safire. 304 pages. Illustrated. Random House. $23.JAMES B. Stockdale, the ex-prisoner of war who was Ross Perot's running mate, was quoted during the campaign as saying that he used to teach the biblical Book of Job to his students at the Naval War College. He summed up its message thusly: "You have to be a man, as Job was asked to be a man by his Lord, and stand up like a man when you are faced with undeserved hardship."
NEWS
By MAGGIE GALLAGHER and MAGGIE GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Sleeper Spy," by William Safire. New York: Random House. 451 pages. $24 Where James Bond led the way, almost every spy thriller has followed: At the center of every spy story is the spy, the man whom every woman wants and all men envy, an ultimate secret agent man, whose cool good looks, suave manner, superbly tailored dinner jacket, swift cars and gorgeous women put the escape in escapist fiction.Trust William Safire to pull-off the impossible: to pen a palpitating spy novel, the hero of which is not a spy at all, but a journalist and a nasty, frumpy old fellow at that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Scandalmonger," by William Safire. Simon & Schuster. 496 pages. $27. George Washington, portrayed in "Scandalmonger" as a hypocrite who likely defrauded the federal government, actually gets off easy. Other American icons, notably Thomas Jefferson (an "atheist and fanatic") and Alexander Hamilton (an "illegitimate brat") are cheerfully swiped off their pedestals in William Safire's latest historical novel, and tossed into a rollicking political saga in which revered Founding Fathers behave pretty much like, well, President Clinton.
NEWS
December 26, 1990
When Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Schevardnaze abruptly resigned last week, we predicted in this space that it would be only a matter of days before the unregenerate old Cold Warriors would "gleefully dust off the old 'warm-smile, iron-teeth' image of Gorbachev that was put to rest when Ronald Reagan put his arm around the Soviet leader in Moscow in 1986." Among those voices, we predicted, would be the New York Times' refurbished old Nixon speech writer, William Safire, who now fulfills our gloomy expectation -- in spades.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 19, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Time, as the old hymn says, like an ever-rolling stream, bears all its sons away. Now it has at last borne away Spiro T. Agnew, too, who had been gone from public view so long that many were startled by his obituary, having assumed him dead for many years.As politicians go, he was personally neither an especially nice nor an especially interesting man, but neither was he the evil figure caricatured over the years by many who should have known better, including me. His short career probably deserves more attention, particularly the detached sort that only historical distance makes possible.
NEWS
By Jesse E. Todd Jr | January 21, 1996
WHILE I ABHOR violence, the idea of President Clinton punching New York Times columnist William Safire in the nose does have some appeal. Mr. Safire has called Hillary Rodham Clinton "a congenital liar" regarding Watergate -- I'm sorry, that was the affair of Mr. Safire's former boss, Richard Nixon; I meant Whitewater -- and Mr. Clinton is alleged by his spokesman to have refrained from a pugilistic response to this insult only because he is, after all,...
NEWS
By MAGGIE GALLAGHER and MAGGIE GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Sleeper Spy," by William Safire. New York: Random House. 451 pages. $24 Where James Bond led the way, almost every spy thriller has followed: At the center of every spy story is the spy, the man whom every woman wants and all men envy, an ultimate secret agent man, whose cool good looks, suave manner, superbly tailored dinner jacket, swift cars and gorgeous women put the escape in escapist fiction.Trust William Safire to pull-off the impossible: to pen a palpitating spy novel, the hero of which is not a spy at all, but a journalist and a nasty, frumpy old fellow at that.
NEWS
By ALEX BEAM | April 23, 1993
Boston. -- As I rushed forward to join the throng celebrating the Rodney King verdicts, I noticed a crumpled scrap of paper underneath my feet.Picking it up, I saw it was the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which states that no one shall ''be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.'' Oh, that silly old thing.In the collective euphoria following the guilty verdicts in Rodney King II, only a few public figures -- Boston attorneys Harvey Silverglate and Alan Dershowitz, New York Times columnist William Safire -- have pointed out the obvious: The four LosAngeles police officers were tried twice for the same crime, in flagrant disregard of the Constitution's protection against double jeopardy.
NEWS
By Nicholas Lemann | November 16, 1992
THE FIRST DISSIDENT: THE BOOK OF JOB IN TODAY'S POLITICS. By William Safire. 304 pages. Illustrated. Random House. $23.JAMES B. Stockdale, the ex-prisoner of war who was Ross Perot's running mate, was quoted during the campaign as saying that he used to teach the biblical Book of Job to his students at the Naval War College. He summed up its message thusly: "You have to be a man, as Job was asked to be a man by his Lord, and stand up like a man when you are faced with undeserved hardship."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | November 2, 1992
No one said being a Joban was going to be easy."The Joban life is the life spent maintaining personal convictions," William Safire writes in his newly published book, "The First Dissident: The Book of Job in Today's Politics."And here it was on a Wednesday, less than a week before Election Day, and he was doing what any number of good citizens have done recently: Discussing who would get his vote for president.The problem was that Mr. Safire, the influential political columnist for the New York Times, had peeked behind Door No. 1, Door No. 2 and Door No. 3, and hadn't liked any of the choices.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 19, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Time, as the old hymn says, like an ever-rolling stream, bears all its sons away. Now it has at last borne away Spiro T. Agnew, too, who had been gone from public view so long that many were startled by his obituary, having assumed him dead for many years.As politicians go, he was personally neither an especially nice nor an especially interesting man, but neither was he the evil figure caricatured over the years by many who should have known better, including me. His short career probably deserves more attention, particularly the detached sort that only historical distance makes possible.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 10, 1991
Having been responsible for the deaths of anywhere from 25,000 to 50,000 Iraqis, George Bush is now being criticized for not killing more of them.First, he is being criticized for not killing more Iraqis when he initially had the chance. The story was leaked last weekend that the United States was just "six hours" away from completely destroying Iraq's fighting force when George Bush opted for a cease-fire instead of more slaughter.Second, Bush is being criticized for steadfastly opposing sending back our troops and planes to kill more Iraqi soldiers now that these soldiers are being used to crush opposition in Iraq.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins | December 31, 1991
TWO WEEKS before Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as president of the Soviet Union, New York Times columnist William Safire opened his column with the following sentence:"Revealing the true colors of a tyrant, Mikhail Gorbachev now seeks to thwart the democratic will of the independent republics his former empire by bidding for the support of the veteran Red Army generals." The ostensible basis for this arrant nonsense was the fact that Gorbachev had held meetings with his military commanders. By that criterion, Safire as easily could have written that George Bush was plotting to become a "tyrant" for meeting with Gen. Colin Powell.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 10, 1991
Having been responsible for the deaths of anywhere from 25,000 to 50,000 Iraqis, George Bush is now being criticized for not killing more of them.First, he is being criticized for not killing more Iraqis when he initially had the chance. The story was leaked last weekend that the United States was just "six hours" away from completely destroying Iraq's fighting force when George Bush opted for a cease-fire instead of more slaughter.Second, Bush is being criticized for steadfastly opposing sending back our troops and planes to kill more Iraqi soldiers now that these soldiers are being used to crush opposition in Iraq.
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