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William Randolph Hearst

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NEWS
October 22, 2002
Millicent Hearst Boudjakdji, 63, president of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, died of cancer Wednesday in Los Angeles. She came from a long line of publishers and philanthropists, and had developed the foundation's two main programs - one supporting journalism education for college students, the other fostering government studies for high school students, including a week in Washington. She covered the United Nations for Hearst Headline News before her 1964 marriage to Raouf Boudjakdji, Algerian ambassador to the United Nations.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
NEWS
October 22, 2002
Millicent Hearst Boudjakdji, 63, president of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, died of cancer Wednesday in Los Angeles. She came from a long line of publishers and philanthropists, and had developed the foundation's two main programs - one supporting journalism education for college students, the other fostering government studies for high school students, including a week in Washington. She covered the United Nations for Hearst Headline News before her 1964 marriage to Raouf Boudjakdji, Algerian ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
Anita Hoffman, 56, who helped then-husband Abbie Hoffman plot the most memorable pranks of the Yippie movement and later helped him hide for years from the FBI, died of breast cancer Sunday in San Francisco.Ms. Hoffman helped Abbie Hoffman disrupt the New York Stock Exchange by throwing money on the trading floor, encircle the Pentagon in a protest against the Vietnam War and plan the demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.Though they divorced, Ms. Hoffman supported Mr. Hoffman for years while he lived underground to escape drug charges.
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw and Jeffrey M. Landaw,Mr. Landaw is a makeup editor at The Sun | November 10, 1991
THE HEARSTS: FATHER AND SON. William Randolph Hearst Jr. with Jack Casserly. Roberts Rinehart. 372 pages. $29.95. Seeing World War II, says William Randolph Hearst Jr., made him want to be "a street version of a good GI Joe." And Bill Hearst -- heir to a gigantic media company, namesake of one of the most admired, feared and hated men in the history of the news business -- seems to have meant it. This helps explain why the Hearst story is an endless temptation to practice psychology without a license.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 13, 2001
Marion Davies' acting career was torpedoed by two men, neither of whom meant to do her any harm. As evidenced by "Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies," a documentary premiering at 8 p.m. tomorrow on TCM, Davies was a talented, expressive actress who particularly shone in comedic roles; a vibrant personality who loved mimicking her fellow Hollywood stars (who rarely seemed to mind); and a solid performer who made any picture she was in that much better. Not that popular film culture has recorded any of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edwin O. Guthman and By Edwin O. Guthman,Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
The Age of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the New American Dream, by H. W. Brands. Doubleday. 499 pages. $29.95. When a carpenter, James Marshall, on an icy morning in January 1848 at Coloma in Northern California spotted a few sparkling pebbles in the bed of a mill race, he suspected they were gold, but of course could not imagine the impact his discovery would have on his workers, his partner, John Sutter, or California and the world. It was, historian H. W. Brands writes in an eminently readable, detail-filled book, The Age of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the New American Dream, "one of those rare moments that divide human existence into before and after.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 2, 2002
The Maryland Film Festival opens tonight with its gala presentation of 10 Under 20, an adventurous collection of animated and live-action shorts, with all their makers in attendance. But the opening feature is Citizen Kane (tomorrow at 10 a.m., at the Charles). It's both an apt opening film for a young festival like Maryland's, and the perfect follow-up to 10 Under 20. For Citizen Kane has always been the quintessential young man's movie. Orson Welles made his first and best mark in film as a 25-year-old boy wonder with this elegant and turbulent 1941 expose of a magnate who resembled William Randolph Hearst.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | January 13, 1993
When one mentions that he's had a fascinating life, Ben King, 83, replies, "Life should be fascinating."Nothing in his long life seems to have deterred him from experiencing it to its fullest: not polio at age 5, a failed first marriage, the Depression, nor the painful death of his second wife from lung cancer three years ago.You won't find Mr. King frequenting senior centers or checking out nursing homes for a room.He still works full time at his business, a wholesale tree farm in Millers that has earned him a place in tree propagation history, and continues his education from the hundreds of books he keeps in his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edwin O. Guthman and By Edwin O. Guthman,Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
The Age of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the New American Dream, by H. W. Brands. Doubleday. 499 pages. $29.95. When a carpenter, James Marshall, on an icy morning in January 1848 at Coloma in Northern California spotted a few sparkling pebbles in the bed of a mill race, he suspected they were gold, but of course could not imagine the impact his discovery would have on his workers, his partner, John Sutter, or California and the world. It was, historian H. W. Brands writes in an eminently readable, detail-filled book, The Age of Gold: The California Gold Rush and the New American Dream, "one of those rare moments that divide human existence into before and after.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 2, 2002
The Maryland Film Festival opens tonight with its gala presentation of 10 Under 20, an adventurous collection of animated and live-action shorts, with all their makers in attendance. But the opening feature is Citizen Kane (tomorrow at 10 a.m., at the Charles). It's both an apt opening film for a young festival like Maryland's, and the perfect follow-up to 10 Under 20. For Citizen Kane has always been the quintessential young man's movie. Orson Welles made his first and best mark in film as a 25-year-old boy wonder with this elegant and turbulent 1941 expose of a magnate who resembled William Randolph Hearst.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 13, 2001
Marion Davies' acting career was torpedoed by two men, neither of whom meant to do her any harm. As evidenced by "Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies," a documentary premiering at 8 p.m. tomorrow on TCM, Davies was a talented, expressive actress who particularly shone in comedic roles; a vibrant personality who loved mimicking her fellow Hollywood stars (who rarely seemed to mind); and a solid performer who made any picture she was in that much better. Not that popular film culture has recorded any of that.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
Anita Hoffman, 56, who helped then-husband Abbie Hoffman plot the most memorable pranks of the Yippie movement and later helped him hide for years from the FBI, died of breast cancer Sunday in San Francisco.Ms. Hoffman helped Abbie Hoffman disrupt the New York Stock Exchange by throwing money on the trading floor, encircle the Pentagon in a protest against the Vietnam War and plan the demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.Though they divorced, Ms. Hoffman supported Mr. Hoffman for years while he lived underground to escape drug charges.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 1995
SAN SIMEON, Calif. -- On the six-mile bus ride up to Hearst Castle, a public-address system blasted passengers with music from the Roaring '20s: trilling saxophones, waa-waa trumpets, simple tunes and lame syncopation. Then a crackle of annoying static broke in, followed by the sandpapery voice of an old-time announcer:"Hearst Castle Radio is on the air! Decades in Review!"It's 1919, and the end of the decade sees changes in the states, the nation and the world!"Dateline: San Simeon, California.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | January 13, 1993
When one mentions that he's had a fascinating life, Ben King, 83, replies, "Life should be fascinating."Nothing in his long life seems to have deterred him from experiencing it to its fullest: not polio at age 5, a failed first marriage, the Depression, nor the painful death of his second wife from lung cancer three years ago.You won't find Mr. King frequenting senior centers or checking out nursing homes for a room.He still works full time at his business, a wholesale tree farm in Millers that has earned him a place in tree propagation history, and continues his education from the hundreds of books he keeps in his home.
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of the earth as the Creator intended it to look.Henry Miller"Big Sur and the Orange of Hieronymous Bosch" Arugged, raw wilderness perched on rocky cliffs ringing an untamed Pacific Ocean, California's Central Coast for years has served as a haven for artists, writers and scientists. It has inspired accomplished Americans such as newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, author Henry Miller and two-time Nobel Peace Prize recipient Dr. Linus Pauling.
FEATURES
By Caroline Spencer and Caroline Spencer,Contributing Writer | September 27, 1992
This is the California that men dreamed of years ago, this is the Pacific that Balboa looked out on from the Peak of Darien, this is the face of the earth as the Creator intended it to look.Henry Miller"Big Sur and the Orange of Hieronymous Bosch" Arugged, raw wilderness perched on rocky cliffs ringing an untamed Pacific Ocean, California's Central Coast for years has served as a haven for artists, writers and scientists. It has inspired accomplished Americans such as newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, author Henry Miller and two-time Nobel Peace Prize recipient Dr. Linus Pauling.
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