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William Osler

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By Victor A. McKusick, M.D. and Victor A. McKusick, M.D.,Special to the Sun | October 31, 1999
Canada-born William Osler (1849-1919) was professor of medicine in four cities in three countries on two continents: McGill U., U. of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins and Oxford. The longest segment of his professional career was the 16 years (1889 to 1905) spent at Johns Hopkins, where he was the first physician-in-chief. He is generally considered to have been the leading physician of his day, and his influence has been almost uniquely persistent.Neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1869-1939) was at Johns Hopkins from 1896 to 1912.
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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2005
Dr. Donald William Osler Hughes, a retired physician and thoroughbred horse breeder and trainer, died of cancer Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The North Baltimore resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised on Druid Hill Avenue, Dr. Hughes was the son of a physician and named for Sir William Osler, one of the founders of Johns Hopkins Hospital and its first physician-in-chief. After graduating from Douglass High School in 1950, he served in the Army for several years. He was a 1957 graduate of what is now Morgan State University and earned his medical degree in 1961 from the Howard University College of Medicine.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
He rose early and worked late. He performed hundreds of autopsies and wrote a landmark medical textbook. At a time when medical students weren't even allowed near patients, he brought them into the hospital wards. It was there, at the bedside, that William Osler believed doctors should be: listening, examining, scribbling down notes. A hundred years after he practiced medicine, many physicians still consider him the greatest doctor of all time. They train in the system he set up, they follow his strategies in examining patients.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
He rose early and worked late. He performed hundreds of autopsies and wrote a landmark medical textbook. At a time when medical students weren't even allowed near patients, he brought them into the hospital wards. It was there, at the bedside, that William Osler believed doctors should be: listening, examining, scribbling down notes. A hundred years after he practiced medicine, many physicians still consider him the greatest doctor of all time. They train in the system he set up, they follow his strategies in examining patients.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2005
Dr. Donald William Osler Hughes, a retired physician and thoroughbred horse breeder and trainer, died of cancer Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The North Baltimore resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised on Druid Hill Avenue, Dr. Hughes was the son of a physician and named for Sir William Osler, one of the founders of Johns Hopkins Hospital and its first physician-in-chief. After graduating from Douglass High School in 1950, he served in the Army for several years. He was a 1957 graduate of what is now Morgan State University and earned his medical degree in 1961 from the Howard University College of Medicine.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Nancy Turnbull Coates Smith, a much-respected figure in the Harford County arts community who was known for her work in several media, died of cancer Tuesday at her Fallston residence. She was 45.Mrs. Smith was a porcelain production worker in the Havre de Grace studio of Blythe & Snodgrass, creators of porcelain dolls, until last spring, when she left because of ill health."Her own work, which consisted of porcelain boxes, honey pots and mobiles, was very fanciful with rather unique design qualities.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | December 10, 1991
CARL SCHOETTLER has written in the news columns about the last resident rabbi's leaving of East Baltimore (for Jerusalem) and of the good rabbi's lament for the days when there were dozens of synagogues in East Baltimore.Synagogues, of course, aren't the only institutions that have disappeared from East Baltimore. Gone, too, are restaurants (Sussman and Lev, Shulman's) and popular food stores (Smelkinson's Dairy and Wartzman's and Stone's Bakery. But gone, too, and missed by many, are the famous Turkish baths of East Baltimore.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
Elizabeth B. Brizendine, a homemaker and retired teacher, died of cancer Sunday at the Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson, where she had lived for the past 10 years. She was 87. Born Elizabeth Bietsch in Quincy, Pa., she earned a chemistry degree at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. and belonged to the Pi Beta Phi sorority, where she was later a national officer and remained active in its Baltimore and Annapolis alumnae clubs. She was a 1945 graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and had a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 6, 1996
LONDON -- Fifty-two years ago today, Dr. Vernon B. Mountcastle was a military surgeon on a ship just off the French coast, tending to soldiers who had been wounded storming Utah Beach on D-Day.Today, Mountcastle, a Johns Hopkins University professor emeritus of neuroscience who has worked to unravel the mysteries of the brain, is back in Europe to be admitted to Britain's prestigious Royal Society.The independent scientific academy was founded in 1660, granted a charter by Charles II in 1662 and sustained for centuries by the motto "Nullius in verba," which can be translated as "Take nobody's word for it."
NEWS
By Sally Buckler and Sally Buckler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 18, 1996
CANADIAN PHYSICIAN Sir William Osler opined, "No bubble is so iridescent or floats longer than that blown by the successful teacher."His remark fits Margaret Haugh of Calvary Evangelical Lutheran Church in Lisbon.After 34 years as a Sunday school teacher for Calvary, Haugh, known as Miss Margaret, retired from her Sunday school duties in June.Church members honored her at a festive celebration, which she called a "joyous day." She claims to have had many helping hands in her endeavor."When I look into the faces of Calvary's little and young ones, I see hope for a brighter, better world tomorrow," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor A. McKusick, M.D. and Victor A. McKusick, M.D.,Special to the Sun | October 31, 1999
Canada-born William Osler (1849-1919) was professor of medicine in four cities in three countries on two continents: McGill U., U. of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins and Oxford. The longest segment of his professional career was the 16 years (1889 to 1905) spent at Johns Hopkins, where he was the first physician-in-chief. He is generally considered to have been the leading physician of his day, and his influence has been almost uniquely persistent.Neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1869-1939) was at Johns Hopkins from 1896 to 1912.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Nancy Turnbull Coates Smith, a much-respected figure in the Harford County arts community who was known for her work in several media, died of cancer Tuesday at her Fallston residence. She was 45.Mrs. Smith was a porcelain production worker in the Havre de Grace studio of Blythe & Snodgrass, creators of porcelain dolls, until last spring, when she left because of ill health."Her own work, which consisted of porcelain boxes, honey pots and mobiles, was very fanciful with rather unique design qualities.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | December 10, 1991
CARL SCHOETTLER has written in the news columns about the last resident rabbi's leaving of East Baltimore (for Jerusalem) and of the good rabbi's lament for the days when there were dozens of synagogues in East Baltimore.Synagogues, of course, aren't the only institutions that have disappeared from East Baltimore. Gone, too, are restaurants (Sussman and Lev, Shulman's) and popular food stores (Smelkinson's Dairy and Wartzman's and Stone's Bakery. But gone, too, and missed by many, are the famous Turkish baths of East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2004
Dr. Palmer H. Futcher, a former faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a medical society administrator and an amateur medical historian, died Friday at Broadmead in Cockeysville of complications from pneumonia. He was 93. Dr. Futcher was a man of wide-ranging interests, including world affairs, the Baltimore Social Register, trout fishing and celestial navigation, said his daughter, Jane Pillow Futcher of Novato, Calif. He was a member of Physicians for Social Responsibility, an anti-nuclear activist group.
NEWS
January 22, 1992
Dr. W. D. Tigertt, medical professor at UM, dies at 76Services for Dr. William D. Tigertt, a retired brigadier general in the Army Medical Corps and a professor at the University of Maryland Medical School where he was director of the clinical laboratories, will be held at 2 p.m. today at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Charles and Saratoga streets.Dr. Tigertt, who was 76 and lived in the 2 Charles Center Apartments, died Sunday at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington after a heart attack a week earlier.
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