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William Nicholson

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By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
William B. Nicholson, who reached the peak of his career in the Chicago Cubs outfield and earned the nickname "Swish" for the sound his bat made as it split the air in the on-deck circle, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in the Broadneck area of Chestertown. He was 81.Mr. Nicholson was inducted into the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame in 1962 and was the first athlete honored with a statue in a Maryland town. His bridge club in Chestertown raised money to place a statue of him swinging his bat in the Chestertown square in 1992.
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NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
The Trial of True Love William Nicholson Nan Talese/Doubleday / 304 pages / $18.95 ] William Nicholson knows about ill-fated love stories. His play Shadowlands (later a film starring Anthony Hopkins) explored the tragic love story of British theologian C.S. Lewis and American poet Joy Gresham and detailed what creates a lasting love affair and marriage. Nicholson's latest novel, The Trial of True Love, poses broader questions about romantic relationships between men and women, pondering whether it's all about beauty, lust and the chase, or whether desire can evolve into lasting love.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2005
The Society of Others by William Nicholson. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. 240 pages. $23.95. The temptation to write a "novel of ideas" has lured many a writer into dangerous territory, especially when such ideas are of the existentialist kind. Because these works probe serious questions, such as the meaning of life or whether there is a higher power governing human behavior, the probability of failure is very high. More practically, novelists who wish to impart great wisdom to their readers often forget to include minor details like a great story, carefully crafted characters, and an engaging plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2005
The Society of Others by William Nicholson. Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. 240 pages. $23.95. The temptation to write a "novel of ideas" has lured many a writer into dangerous territory, especially when such ideas are of the existentialist kind. Because these works probe serious questions, such as the meaning of life or whether there is a higher power governing human behavior, the probability of failure is very high. More practically, novelists who wish to impart great wisdom to their readers often forget to include minor details like a great story, carefully crafted characters, and an engaging plot.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
The Fudo Myoh-oh, a 33-foot-tall, 7-ton sculpture carved at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, will find a permanent home at Becton Dickinson's corporate headquarters in Franklin Lakes, N.J., according to the college.The Alaskan cedar sculpture, which was carved by three Japanese sculptors -- Yasuhiko Hashimoto, Jinichi Itoh and Isao Yanaguimoto -- is the largest Fudo Myoh-oh in the world. The Fudo Myoh-oh, or "immovable God of Light" is a reincarnation of the Cosmic Buddha, an angry warrior-like Buddha that represents the Buddha's power against evil.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
The Trial of True Love William Nicholson Nan Talese/Doubleday / 304 pages / $18.95 ] William Nicholson knows about ill-fated love stories. His play Shadowlands (later a film starring Anthony Hopkins) explored the tragic love story of British theologian C.S. Lewis and American poet Joy Gresham and detailed what creates a lasting love affair and marriage. Nicholson's latest novel, The Trial of True Love, poses broader questions about romantic relationships between men and women, pondering whether it's all about beauty, lust and the chase, or whether desire can evolve into lasting love.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
Margaret E. Grant, 80, housekeeper Margaret E. Grant, a retired housekeeper and child-care provider, died of cancer Tuesday at the Joseph Richey Hospice in Baltimore. She was 80. Mrs. Grant, who lived on East 43rd Street, was born Margaret Morrison in Carthage, N.C., the daughter of sharecropper parents. After graduating from public schools there, she moved to Baltimore in 1945 after marriage to William Nicholson, a soldier who died that year. Until retiring in 1975, Mrs. Grant worked as a housekeeper for 30 years, primarily for families in Dickeyville.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ | October 12, 2005
A man charged as a kingpin in a major East Baltimore drug ring pleaded guilty yesterday to conspiracy to distribute cocaine under a plea agreement that means he will spend three years in prison. Prosecutors said William Nicholson, 28, of Abingdon supplied high-volume drug dealers in Baltimore with large quantities of cocaine. Had he been successfully prosecuted as a drug kingpin, Nicholson could have faced 40 years in prison. Nicholson was among more than two dozen charged as a result of wiretap investigations conducted in 2002 and 2003 by city, county and federal authorities.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 26, 1998
Windswept moors, billowing capes and waves breaking on the shore are just a few of the visual cues that tell audiences what they're in for in "Firelight," a fluffy, Gothically romantic period drama starring the lovely Sophie Marceau and sexy Stephen Dillane.William Nicholson's film has everything an unreconstructed romance-addict could ask for: two very attractive lead players, a suitably fantastical setup, evocative locations and, of all things, a happy ending. Filmgoers may well roll their eyes at such loopy dialogue as "I never knew there was so much power in desire," but they have to hand it to "Firelight" for being so unapologetically what it is: highbrow pulp that combines soft-core sexual imagery and excruciatingly good taste in a delicious melange of retrograde romance.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 8, 1992
'Map of the Heart' at Fells Point Corner"Map of the Heart," by British playwright William Nicholson, makes its American debut at Fells Point Corner Theatre on Friday. The play tells the story of a man who leaves his wife and daughter to work with his lover in the Sudan, where he is subsequently taken hostage.Nicholson is the author of "Shadowlands," a chronicle of the romance of author C. S. Lewis and poet Joy Davidman, which was produced on Broadway two seasons ago. "Map of theHeart" will be directed by Robert Clingan and feature a cast headed by Ray Barcia, Lynne R. Sigler and Tricia Blackburn.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
William B. Nicholson, who reached the peak of his career in the Chicago Cubs outfield and earned the nickname "Swish" for the sound his bat made as it split the air in the on-deck circle, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in the Broadneck area of Chestertown. He was 81.Mr. Nicholson was inducted into the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame in 1962 and was the first athlete honored with a statue in a Maryland town. His bridge club in Chestertown raised money to place a statue of him swinging his bat in the Chestertown square in 1992.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
The Fudo Myoh-oh, a 33-foot-tall, 7-ton sculpture carved at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, will find a permanent home at Becton Dickinson's corporate headquarters in Franklin Lakes, N.J., according to the college.The Alaskan cedar sculpture, which was carved by three Japanese sculptors -- Yasuhiko Hashimoto, Jinichi Itoh and Isao Yanaguimoto -- is the largest Fudo Myoh-oh in the world. The Fudo Myoh-oh, or "immovable God of Light" is a reincarnation of the Cosmic Buddha, an angry warrior-like Buddha that represents the Buddha's power against evil.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 7, 1991
Surprise may be a key element in live theater, but there were few surprises among this year's Tony Award nominations, announced in New York yesterday."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | May 20, 1994
As "Shadowlands" played Sunday evening, unusual things happened at the intimate Colonial Players Theater just off State Circle in Annapolis.When the intermission lights came up, there was a collective "aw" uttered by an audience disappointed at having to let go of playwright William Nicholson's extraordinary characters, even for a little while. The "aw" was followed by a sustained round of intermission applause, also a Colonial Players rarity in my experience.And, as the story spun to its sad conclusion, I heard more sobbing, nose-blowing and tissue-rustling than in all my other visits to East Street combined.
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