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NEWS
January 4, 2006
On December 31, 2005, WILLIAM MORRIS LIPHAM of Arnold. Beloved husband of Doreen Lipham. Loving father of Wayne Lipham. Devoted brother of Dorothy Wynn; grandfather to two grandchildren. Friends may call at the BARRANCO AND SONS P.A. SEVERNA PARK FUNERAL HOME, Ritchie Hwy at Robinson Rd on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. A service will be held on Wednesday 7:30 P.M. at the Funeral Home. Interment will be held at Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville on Friday at 2:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to: Hospice of the Chesapeake, 445 Defense Hwy, Annapolis, MD 21401.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
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NEWS
February 8, 2003
Peter Shaw, 84, a producer and former agent married to actress Angela Lansbury, died in Los Angeles Jan. 29. Born in Reading, England, Mr. Shaw served in the British army during World War II. After his discharge, he was signed to a contract by MGM Studios, where he met Ms. Lansbury. The couple were married in London in 1949. He worked as an agent for William Morris, representing such actors as Robert Mitchum, Katharine Hepburn and Anna Magnani. He worked at MGM again in the 1960s as assistant head of production before returning to William Morris.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | January 22, 2009
Rice signs with William Morris; look for books, tours in her future Hours after the inauguration of President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice signed with the William Morris Agency to pursue opportunities that are likely to include books and lectures, Variety reports on its Web site. "It is an honor to represent Secretary Rice as she prepares to embark on the next chapter of her incredible career," said WMA Chairman and CEO Jim Wiatt. "She is a cultural force, and we look forward to assisting her in her ongoing philanthropic initiatives in education and women's empowerment."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1993
Q: I am planning a trip this month to the Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole. What will the weather be like?A: Take your sweaters, long johns and a good slicker.The normal daily maximum in the region in October is 56 degrees, with the minimums at 26. However, those temperatures are for the parks' lower elevation. Take another 5 degrees off those numbers if you are planning to climb or hike.Normal monthly precipitation there at this time of the year is 1 inch, compared with 2.2 inches in June and compared with 3.5 inches in New York.
NEWS
By Gregg Kilday and Gregg Kilday,L.A. Times | July 30, 1995
"The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business," by Frank Rose. HarperBusiness. 416 pages. $30 This book ultimately reads like a melodramatic remake of "The Bad and the Beautiful."Mr. Rose tries to cover so much territory that the reader has to rush to keep up. And in an effort to sketch in the accompanying social history, he sometimes overdoes his effects, everything from television to Vegas to Elvis' pelvic thrusts are described as "atomic."But given the dramatic portraits he provides along the way, that's hardly a deal-breaker.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | January 22, 2009
Rice signs with William Morris; look for books, tours in her future Hours after the inauguration of President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice signed with the William Morris Agency to pursue opportunities that are likely to include books and lectures, Variety reports on its Web site. "It is an honor to represent Secretary Rice as she prepares to embark on the next chapter of her incredible career," said WMA Chairman and CEO Jim Wiatt. "She is a cultural force, and we look forward to assisting her in her ongoing philanthropic initiatives in education and women's empowerment."
FEATURES
By New York Times | November 4, 1991
CBS AND A GROUP of American and European investors yesterday bought the television rights to "Scarlett," the sequel to "Gone With the Wind," for a record $8 million in a deal that stunned Hollywood.Several Hollywood executives and agents said the highest price previously paid for the rights to a book was about $2.5 million for Gay Talese's "Thy Neighbor's Wife," which was never made into a movie."There's nothing like this in the history of the publishing business," said Irene Webb, vice president of the motion-picture and literary departments of the William Morris Agency, which worked out the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 17, 2003
William Morris, a leader of the 19th-century arts & crafts movement in England, was a polymath who created designs for textiles, wrote poetry and published magnificently crafted, illustrated books. During his lifetime, he was something of a contradiction: a well-born aristocrat who championed socialism, a Renaissance man of the industrial era and an unapologetic romantic who drew much of his inspiration from the Gothic art of the Middle Ages. Now Morris' wide-ranging interests are highlighted in a small but delightful show of his designs for fabrics, wallpaper and tapestries at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The show includes many beautiful examples of Morris' elegant woven woolens, block-printed cotton fabrics and floral designs inspired by Near Eastern and Asian art. As an interior designer, Morris aimed to create total environments that would surround a home's inhabitants with beauty.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 18, 1997
To: S. ClausFrom: William Morris AgencyRe: Updating your imageDEAR MR. CLAUS,After an exhaustive personal and professional evaluation, as per your request, we've identified seven key areas, or "core growth elements" to work on:Jazz up that wardrobe!To William Morris, heavy red flannel says "Ho-hum," not "Ho-ho-ho!" And fur is out, out, out! Eighty-seven-year-old society matrons in Manhattan can get away with it; an international toy magnate can't.The buzzword in fashion today: active-wear -- breathable, lightweight fabrics for people on the go.Our suggestions:For that hectic sleigh ride on the evening of 12/24: weatherproof Goretex shell, St. John's Bay nylon wind pants, Nike Max Triax running shoes for improved rooftop stability.
NEWS
January 4, 2006
On December 31, 2005, WILLIAM MORRIS LIPHAM of Arnold. Beloved husband of Doreen Lipham. Loving father of Wayne Lipham. Devoted brother of Dorothy Wynn; grandfather to two grandchildren. Friends may call at the BARRANCO AND SONS P.A. SEVERNA PARK FUNERAL HOME, Ritchie Hwy at Robinson Rd on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. A service will be held on Wednesday 7:30 P.M. at the Funeral Home. Interment will be held at Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville on Friday at 2:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to: Hospice of the Chesapeake, 445 Defense Hwy, Annapolis, MD 21401.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 17, 2003
William Morris, a leader of the 19th-century arts & crafts movement in England, was a polymath who created designs for textiles, wrote poetry and published magnificently crafted, illustrated books. During his lifetime, he was something of a contradiction: a well-born aristocrat who championed socialism, a Renaissance man of the industrial era and an unapologetic romantic who drew much of his inspiration from the Gothic art of the Middle Ages. Now Morris' wide-ranging interests are highlighted in a small but delightful show of his designs for fabrics, wallpaper and tapestries at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The show includes many beautiful examples of Morris' elegant woven woolens, block-printed cotton fabrics and floral designs inspired by Near Eastern and Asian art. As an interior designer, Morris aimed to create total environments that would surround a home's inhabitants with beauty.
NEWS
February 8, 2003
Peter Shaw, 84, a producer and former agent married to actress Angela Lansbury, died in Los Angeles Jan. 29. Born in Reading, England, Mr. Shaw served in the British army during World War II. After his discharge, he was signed to a contract by MGM Studios, where he met Ms. Lansbury. The couple were married in London in 1949. He worked as an agent for William Morris, representing such actors as Robert Mitchum, Katharine Hepburn and Anna Magnani. He worked at MGM again in the 1960s as assistant head of production before returning to William Morris.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 18, 1997
To: S. ClausFrom: William Morris AgencyRe: Updating your imageDEAR MR. CLAUS,After an exhaustive personal and professional evaluation, as per your request, we've identified seven key areas, or "core growth elements" to work on:Jazz up that wardrobe!To William Morris, heavy red flannel says "Ho-hum," not "Ho-ho-ho!" And fur is out, out, out! Eighty-seven-year-old society matrons in Manhattan can get away with it; an international toy magnate can't.The buzzword in fashion today: active-wear -- breathable, lightweight fabrics for people on the go.Our suggestions:For that hectic sleigh ride on the evening of 12/24: weatherproof Goretex shell, St. John's Bay nylon wind pants, Nike Max Triax running shoes for improved rooftop stability.
NEWS
By Gregg Kilday and Gregg Kilday,L.A. Times | July 30, 1995
"The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business," by Frank Rose. HarperBusiness. 416 pages. $30 This book ultimately reads like a melodramatic remake of "The Bad and the Beautiful."Mr. Rose tries to cover so much territory that the reader has to rush to keep up. And in an effort to sketch in the accompanying social history, he sometimes overdoes his effects, everything from television to Vegas to Elvis' pelvic thrusts are described as "atomic."But given the dramatic portraits he provides along the way, that's hardly a deal-breaker.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1993
Q: I am planning a trip this month to the Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole. What will the weather be like?A: Take your sweaters, long johns and a good slicker.The normal daily maximum in the region in October is 56 degrees, with the minimums at 26. However, those temperatures are for the parks' lower elevation. Take another 5 degrees off those numbers if you are planning to climb or hike.Normal monthly precipitation there at this time of the year is 1 inch, compared with 2.2 inches in June and compared with 3.5 inches in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
FEATURES
By New York Times | November 4, 1991
CBS AND A GROUP of American and European investors yesterday bought the television rights to "Scarlett," the sequel to "Gone With the Wind," for a record $8 million in a deal that stunned Hollywood.Several Hollywood executives and agents said the highest price previously paid for the rights to a book was about $2.5 million for Gay Talese's "Thy Neighbor's Wife," which was never made into a movie."There's nothing like this in the history of the publishing business," said Irene Webb, vice president of the motion-picture and literary departments of the William Morris Agency, which worked out the deal.
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