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William Mckinley

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NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2001
One hundred years ago today, at seven minutes after 4 o'clock in the afternoon, an assassin fired two bullets into the chest and ample belly of William McKinley, the 25th president of the United States. The crime took place at the Hall of Music at the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo; in the background a Bach sonata was being played. McKinley, then at the height of his popularity, had spent the day sightseeing at the Falls at Niagara. Against the misgivings of his advisers, he insisted on returning to the exhibition to be glimpsed and greeted by thousands who had heard the greatest speech of his presidency the day before.
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TOPIC
By Thomas Schaller and Thomas Schaller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2002
As the second year of his administration takes shape, a president who responded so forcefully to a surprise attack on America boasts a dismal record on economic issues ranging from business regulation to his handling of the economy. Consider how hollow and halting the president's inaugural words sound today. "Most of our financial laws are the outgrowth of experience and trial, and should not be amended without investigation and demonstration of the wisdom of the proposed changes," he cautioned.
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NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
A hundred years ago today, a president was inaugurated who promised to avoid conquest but made the United States an imperial power.His name was William McKinley, a now neglected president, and he took his oath of office with the following assertion: "We want no wars of conquest; we must avoid the temptation of territorial aggression. War should never be entered into until every agency of peace has failed; peace is preferable to war in almost every contingency."Compared to the European powers, the United States seemed second-rate.
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2001
One hundred years ago today, at seven minutes after 4 o'clock in the afternoon, an assassin fired two bullets into the chest and ample belly of William McKinley, the 25th president of the United States. The crime took place at the Hall of Music at the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo; in the background a Bach sonata was being played. McKinley, then at the height of his popularity, had spent the day sightseeing at the Falls at Niagara. Against the misgivings of his advisers, he insisted on returning to the exhibition to be glimpsed and greeted by thousands who had heard the greatest speech of his presidency the day before.
TOPIC
By Thomas Schaller and Thomas Schaller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2002
As the second year of his administration takes shape, a president who responded so forcefully to a surprise attack on America boasts a dismal record on economic issues ranging from business regulation to his handling of the economy. Consider how hollow and halting the president's inaugural words sound today. "Most of our financial laws are the outgrowth of experience and trial, and should not be amended without investigation and demonstration of the wisdom of the proposed changes," he cautioned.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | February 24, 1994
IN AN editorial on George Washington's birthday, The Sun noted that historians asked to assess the presidents had on four separate occasions in the past half century rated George second and Abraham Lincoln firstA fifth poll of historians rated Franklin D. Roosevelt second, with Washington third. FDR was third in all the other polls.As a devout follower of astrology, I am pleased to note that those three men claimed birth dates that fell within a few days of each other. They were influenced by the same stars and planets.
NEWS
By Nathan Miller | March 5, 1996
BIG BUSINESS and industry were donating huge sums to hand-picked candidates. The voters were assailed by a never-ending drumfire of propaganda. Candidates were being packaged and marketed like new products.Part of the preliminaries of the current presidential campaign? Hardly. These were all part of the presidential campaign of 1896, a full century ago, exactly a century agoin which William McKinley, the Republican, soundly defeated William Jennings Bryan in the election that introduced modern campaign techniques to American politics.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 21, 1990
FOR THE FOURTH time since 1963, Thanksgiving tomorrow falls on Nov. 22. This is always a somber congruence for Americans of a certain age -- those who can never forget the date of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.That was one of those rare historical events which almost everyone alive at the time remembers forever, and remembers where he or she was on hearing the news. It is still the only event ever to cause the television networks to suspend commercials and coverage of everything else but the assassination and its aftermath for a full two days.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 29, 1996
PARIS -- It does not at the moment look as if presidential candidate Bob Dole will need a foreign policy, but if he should be elected he will find many who are anxious to provide him with one.The lead article in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs offers ''A Foreign Policy for Candidate Dole,'' which the authors characterize as ''benevolent hegemony.'' They are not alone in making such a proposal. Hegemony seems the policy of choice, in nominally conservative circles, opposed principally by the ''realists.
NEWS
March 12, 1997
Big money influence hurts ordinary folksThe loss of the ordinary citizen's influence, inherent in a system where big money plays an inordinate role in political campaigns, betrays the basic premises of our American system.The state Senate should pass all campaign finance bills which have cleared the House of Delegates this session in the hope that the General Assembly will come down on the side of those without great wealth, who nonetheless seek a place at the table and a voice in the direction of our state.
NEWS
March 12, 1997
Big money influence hurts ordinary folksThe loss of the ordinary citizen's influence, inherent in a system where big money plays an inordinate role in political campaigns, betrays the basic premises of our American system.The state Senate should pass all campaign finance bills which have cleared the House of Delegates this session in the hope that the General Assembly will come down on the side of those without great wealth, who nonetheless seek a place at the table and a voice in the direction of our state.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
A hundred years ago today, a president was inaugurated who promised to avoid conquest but made the United States an imperial power.His name was William McKinley, a now neglected president, and he took his oath of office with the following assertion: "We want no wars of conquest; we must avoid the temptation of territorial aggression. War should never be entered into until every agency of peace has failed; peace is preferable to war in almost every contingency."Compared to the European powers, the United States seemed second-rate.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 29, 1996
PARIS -- It does not at the moment look as if presidential candidate Bob Dole will need a foreign policy, but if he should be elected he will find many who are anxious to provide him with one.The lead article in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs offers ''A Foreign Policy for Candidate Dole,'' which the authors characterize as ''benevolent hegemony.'' They are not alone in making such a proposal. Hegemony seems the policy of choice, in nominally conservative circles, opposed principally by the ''realists.
NEWS
By Nathan Miller | March 5, 1996
BIG BUSINESS and industry were donating huge sums to hand-picked candidates. The voters were assailed by a never-ending drumfire of propaganda. Candidates were being packaged and marketed like new products.Part of the preliminaries of the current presidential campaign? Hardly. These were all part of the presidential campaign of 1896, a full century ago, exactly a century agoin which William McKinley, the Republican, soundly defeated William Jennings Bryan in the election that introduced modern campaign techniques to American politics.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | February 24, 1994
IN AN editorial on George Washington's birthday, The Sun noted that historians asked to assess the presidents had on four separate occasions in the past half century rated George second and Abraham Lincoln firstA fifth poll of historians rated Franklin D. Roosevelt second, with Washington third. FDR was third in all the other polls.As a devout follower of astrology, I am pleased to note that those three men claimed birth dates that fell within a few days of each other. They were influenced by the same stars and planets.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 21, 1990
FOR THE FOURTH time since 1963, Thanksgiving tomorrow falls on Nov. 22. This is always a somber congruence for Americans of a certain age -- those who can never forget the date of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.That was one of those rare historical events which almost everyone alive at the time remembers forever, and remembers where he or she was on hearing the news. It is still the only event ever to cause the television networks to suspend commercials and coverage of everything else but the assassination and its aftermath for a full two days.
FEATURES
September 6, 2007
Sept. 6 1901 President William McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y. McKinley died eight days later.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | February 16, 1992
A fellow who needed money for an operation walked into the American Political Items Collectors (APIC) convention in Anaheim, Calif., last August with a couple of old campaign buttons to see what he could get for them. The convention was called to order over the public address system and, in keeping with an APIC tradition, the buttons were auctioned, right then and there. One was an extremely rare button picturing John W. Davis and his running mate, Charles Bryan, the 1924 Democratic candidates.
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