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William Manchester

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By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
William Manchester, the author of sweeping biographies of John F. Kennedy, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Winston Churchill and H.L. Mencken, died yesterday of stroke complications at his home in Middletown, Conn. He was 82. A decorated combat veteran of World War II, Mr. Manchester first honed his reporting skills at newspapers in Oklahoma and Baltimore in beginning a prolific half-century as a writer. Mr. Manchester, a native New Englander, was a longtime writer-in-residence and history professor at Wesleyan University in Middletown, and he turned out copy in marathon writing sessions of up to 50 hours in his office there.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2004
William Manchester, the author of sweeping biographies of John F. Kennedy, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Winston Churchill and H.L. Mencken, died yesterday of stroke complications at his home in Middletown, Conn. He was 82. A decorated combat veteran of World War II, Mr. Manchester first honed his reporting skills at newspapers in Oklahoma and Baltimore in beginning a prolific half-century as a writer. Mr. Manchester, a native New Englander, was a longtime writer-in-residence and history professor at Wesleyan University in Middletown, and he turned out copy in marathon writing sessions of up to 50 hours in his office there.
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NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | July 12, 1992
A WORLD LIT ONLY BY FIRE.William Manchester.Little, Brown.318 pages. $24.95. Life isn't divided into chapters like a textbook, the seam of history being continuous.Yet William Manchester persuasively argues that the Middle Ages ended Sept. 7, 1522, the day that a few surviving members of Ferdinand Magellan's crew returned to Spain, having circumnavigated the Earth.The medieval mind-set was already dying before the Victoria sailed into the Spanish port of Sanlucar, notes Mr. Manchester, the well-known biographer (John F. Kennedy, MacArthur, Churchill)
NEWS
October 23, 2003
An interview with Rolland Amos, facilitator for the Biography Book Club at Barnes & Noble Booksellers in Ellicott City. What is your club reading? Mr. Capone by Robert J. Schoenberg. How did this club get started? I saw a flier at the store on the club. They were reading a book on Thomas Jefferson so I decided to go. The facilitator then had to leave so I assumed his duties. That was three years ago. The club is in its fourth year, at least. Who are some of the people your club has enjoyed reading about most?
NEWS
October 23, 2003
An interview with Rolland Amos, facilitator for the Biography Book Club at Barnes & Noble Booksellers in Ellicott City. What is your club reading? Mr. Capone by Robert J. Schoenberg. How did this club get started? I saw a flier at the store on the club. They were reading a book on Thomas Jefferson so I decided to go. The facilitator then had to leave so I assumed his duties. That was three years ago. The club is in its fourth year, at least. Who are some of the people your club has enjoyed reading about most?
NEWS
By James H. Bready | July 31, 1994
Local authors with books on the way to a second life as movie or TV series:* Stephen Dixon, whose New York novel "Garbage" will be produced by Orion Pictures. Some of the proceeds, says Mr. Dixon, of the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, will go toward younger Dixons' college tuition; some toward a second pair of glasses for himself.* Sun film critic Stephen Hunter (whose next novel, "Dirty White Boys," is due out in September from Random House) is in the Hollywood-option stage with no fewer than three of his suspense thrillers: "Point of Impact," "The Day Before Midnight" and, already, "Dirty White Boys."
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | January 7, 1996
This home to hairdo stylists and hardcrab malleteers, to lacrosse gunners and once-more-unto-the-breach shortstops - is it also friendly country for a writer? This Baltimore, this Maryland - does the region invite and nourish careers in literature? Does it earn more than a pro rata share of publishing glory?Yes. Certainly. The proof is in stores, libraries, homes - and the intellects and performances of a wide array of resident writers.Some writers will dispute this confident assertion; but writers - insecure, on deadline, their rejections mounting - can be doubtful witnesses.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
MIDDLETOWN, Conn. - The words, always chosen with precision, still come freely. When there is a lengthy pause in his slightly slurred speech, it is not because he is having difficulty finding the right one. It's more complicated than that. The wit remains intact, still sharp enough to leave either tiny nick or deep laceration. Of President Bush, who two weeks ago hung the prestigious National Humanities Medal around his neck: "Not as smart as his wife." Of television news anchors: "Boobs whose IQs are slightly below their body temperatures."
NEWS
September 8, 1996
I've been very fortunate in my choice of books recently; they've been fascinating. I just put down William Manchester's "American Caesar," about Douglas MacArthur. It's outstanding. He's not shy about making judgments and he always backs those judgments solidly.And Alan Bullock's "Hitler and Stalin" is terrific. He compares the two lives in five-year intervals - he really shows how horrible they both were.I don't read fiction much, but I did like "The Runaway Jury" by John Grisham. It was very topical, about a tobacco company lawsuit.
NEWS
September 10, 1995
Roger Angell's "Season Ticket" and Tom Clancy's "Without Remorse." I had to read Clancy because he's an owner here, and I work here.-- Harry Beninghoff, tour guideat Camden Yards."
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
MIDDLETOWN, Conn. - The words, always chosen with precision, still come freely. When there is a lengthy pause in his slightly slurred speech, it is not because he is having difficulty finding the right one. It's more complicated than that. The wit remains intact, still sharp enough to leave either tiny nick or deep laceration. Of President Bush, who two weeks ago hung the prestigious National Humanities Medal around his neck: "Not as smart as his wife." Of television news anchors: "Boobs whose IQs are slightly below their body temperatures."
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | January 7, 1996
This home to hairdo stylists and hardcrab malleteers, to lacrosse gunners and once-more-unto-the-breach shortstops - is it also friendly country for a writer? This Baltimore, this Maryland - does the region invite and nourish careers in literature? Does it earn more than a pro rata share of publishing glory?Yes. Certainly. The proof is in stores, libraries, homes - and the intellects and performances of a wide array of resident writers.Some writers will dispute this confident assertion; but writers - insecure, on deadline, their rejections mounting - can be doubtful witnesses.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | July 31, 1994
Local authors with books on the way to a second life as movie or TV series:* Stephen Dixon, whose New York novel "Garbage" will be produced by Orion Pictures. Some of the proceeds, says Mr. Dixon, of the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, will go toward younger Dixons' college tuition; some toward a second pair of glasses for himself.* Sun film critic Stephen Hunter (whose next novel, "Dirty White Boys," is due out in September from Random House) is in the Hollywood-option stage with no fewer than three of his suspense thrillers: "Point of Impact," "The Day Before Midnight" and, already, "Dirty White Boys."
NEWS
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | July 12, 1992
A WORLD LIT ONLY BY FIRE.William Manchester.Little, Brown.318 pages. $24.95. Life isn't divided into chapters like a textbook, the seam of history being continuous.Yet William Manchester persuasively argues that the Middle Ages ended Sept. 7, 1522, the day that a few surviving members of Ferdinand Magellan's crew returned to Spain, having circumnavigated the Earth.The medieval mind-set was already dying before the Victoria sailed into the Spanish port of Sanlucar, notes Mr. Manchester, the well-known biographer (John F. Kennedy, MacArthur, Churchill)
NEWS
January 19, 2012
The legendary publisher Alfred A. Knopf was a man who valued excellence. For years he searched for someone to write a biography of his friend Henry Louis Mencken. In his opinion, no biography up to then, including that of William Manchester, was right. The ideal choice would provide an intellectual understanding of Mencken's many facets but also impart an idea of what the man was really like. Above all, it had to be written by a talent fit to bear the Knopf imprint. As the decades passed, Knopf despaired such a biography would ever be written.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
Richard K. Tucker, a former Evening Sun reporter and Korean War correspondent, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Mansfield, Mass. He was 89. Mr. Tucker was born and raised in Fort Madison, Iowa, and earned a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1936 from the University of Iowa. He was a reporter for the Indianapolis News for six years until joining the Army in 1942, when he joined the staff of Gen. Douglas MacArthur in the Pacific. He also was a witness to the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, family members said.
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