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William Jennings Bryan

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NEWS
August 13, 2006
Forty years ago, a 214-year-old theatrical debt was paid in the Anne Arundel County Courthouse. The Sun reported on Aug. 13, 1966, that the Port Tobacco Players presented Inherit the Wind, a historical play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. The Charles County theatrical group told state capital audiences that it was repaying the visit of some Annapolis actors to their part of the Maryland colony in 1752. The courthouse setting for the drama could not have been better. Inherit the Wind depicts the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial" about the teaching of evolution in schools.
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NEWS
August 13, 2006
Forty years ago, a 214-year-old theatrical debt was paid in the Anne Arundel County Courthouse. The Sun reported on Aug. 13, 1966, that the Port Tobacco Players presented Inherit the Wind, a historical play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. The Charles County theatrical group told state capital audiences that it was repaying the visit of some Annapolis actors to their part of the Maryland colony in 1752. The courthouse setting for the drama could not have been better. Inherit the Wind depicts the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial" about the teaching of evolution in schools.
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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 5, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 31st was held in 1908. President Theodore Roosevelt chose to treat his seven and half years in office (obtaining it when William McKinley was slain) as two terms and declined to run. He favored William Howard Taft, his secretary of war, who was easily nominated.The Democrats, who had tried a conservative in 1904, after losing twice with William Jennings Bryan, went back to Bryan.Both candidates claimed to be logical successors to TR: Taft as his hand-picked choice, Bryan as an advocate of liberal policies similar to TR's progressivism.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 18, 2006
In the sweltering heat of a late June day in 1912, William Jennings Bryan, three-time Democratic presidential nominee, stepped from a passenger train at Baltimore's Union Station. Bryan, with his shiny pate and wispy hair, was an impressive sight to the adoring crowds gathered on the smoky subterranean station platform to welcome him to the city. Dressed in dark trousers, alpaca coat, low collar, black bow tie and carrying a Panama straw hat by his side, he slowly made his way up the stairs and through the waiting room to a taxi that conveyed him to the Belvedere Hotel.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 15, 1996
150 years ago in The SunSept. 16: We noted considerable activity in the oyster business along the Basin yesterday, giving evidence that the season for the favorite delicacy had commenced.Sept. 20: On the Point yesterday we noticed in no less than four places in the streets gangs of small boys who were kindling fires with shavings by way of amusement. This is a very dangerous sport.100 years ago in The SunSept. 18: Mr. Enoch Pratt, founder of the great public library that bears his name, died a few minutes before 9 o'clock last night at his country home, "Tivoli," on Woodbourne Avenue, Govanstown, in the eighty-ninth year of his age.Sept.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 7, 1991
SEN. TOM HARKIN of Iowa is "the new William Jennings 5/8Bryan," afriend of his told Alex Beam of the Boston Herald.Just what the Democrats need -- a new version of the biggest loser in presidential election history!Harkin, like Bryan, is a populist and a great orator "who could easily electrify a convention," Beam wrote. Yes, and electrocute his party.Bryan was the party's nominee three times, in 1896, 1900 and 1908. He lost to William McKinley in 1896 and 1900 and to William Howard Taft in 1908.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 23, 1997
150 years ago in The SunFeb. 24: For nearly two months a well in Fawn Street, between High and Exeter streets, has been caved in, and is still caving in, to the detriment of the street and the pavement, to say nothing of the inconvenience to which the neighborhood is subjected by the uselessness of the pump.Feb. 27: RELIEF FOR IRELAND -- A note from Hugh Jenkins Esq., treasurer of the Irish Relief Fund, acknowledges the receipt of $374.85, collected at the Cathedral on Sunday last.Feb. March 1: YOUNG SPRING -- This morning ushers the bantling into existence, and as is the case with other new borns, we may expect a succession of squalls for a month at least, after which the infant will no doubt become more interesting, and by its smiling and cooing gladden the hearts of the sons and daughters of earth.
NEWS
July 9, 1996
"YOU SHALL NOT press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns! You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold!"With these words, spoken 100 years ago today, William Jennings Bryan sent the Democratic National Convention into a frenzy over an issue -- goldbugs versus silverites -- now relegated to history books. This newspaper commented it was "the first time. . . a delegate to a presidential convention has captured a presidential nomination by a single speech."And so it was. And so it is. There have been exciting convention moments since but nothing to compare with Bryan's oratory and passion.
FEATURES
August 13, 1999
This week's decision by the Kansas Board of Education to delete references to evolution from the science curriculum evokes memories of one of the century's most celebrated trials. In the summer of 1925, a Tennessee high school teacher named John T. Scopes was convicted of teaching evolution in violation of state law. The prosecution was led by three-time presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan, the defense by legendary attorney Clarence Darrow. That most famous of Evening Sun correspondents, H. L. Mencken, was in Dayton, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
The concession speech that brings down the curtain on a failed bid for the presidency is perhaps one of the most painful and bittersweet realities of American political life. For one last moment, the candidate beaming, looking like nothing is wrong, stands with his running mate on a stage. In the audience are family members, politicians, advisers, campaign workers and well-wishers all fighting to hold onto their emotions. The press, like undertakers at a train wreck, are there to embalm for history the final utterances of the candidates.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
The concession speech that brings down the curtain on a failed bid for the presidency is perhaps one of the most painful and bittersweet realities of American political life. For one last moment, the candidate beaming, looking like nothing is wrong, stands with his running mate on a stage. In the audience are family members, politicians, advisers, campaign workers and well-wishers all fighting to hold onto their emotions. The press, like undertakers at a train wreck, are there to embalm for history the final utterances of the candidates.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
Allan Charles, Baltimore advertising executive and collector of vintage advertising posters, sent me some time ago a photograph of a 1900 William Jennings Bryan campaign poster from his collection. The poster recalls the colorful days when national conventions weren't scripted, sanitized lovefests like the recently concluded Republican gathering in Philadelphia, which had all the drama of a Lawrence Welk re-run from the 1970s. They used to be heart-pounding, exciting free-for-alls, with results that weren't guaranteed with the first rap of the convention chairman's gavel.
FEATURES
August 13, 1999
This week's decision by the Kansas Board of Education to delete references to evolution from the science curriculum evokes memories of one of the century's most celebrated trials. In the summer of 1925, a Tennessee high school teacher named John T. Scopes was convicted of teaching evolution in violation of state law. The prosecution was led by three-time presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan, the defense by legendary attorney Clarence Darrow. That most famous of Evening Sun correspondents, H. L. Mencken, was in Dayton, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 23, 1997
150 years ago in The SunFeb. 24: For nearly two months a well in Fawn Street, between High and Exeter streets, has been caved in, and is still caving in, to the detriment of the street and the pavement, to say nothing of the inconvenience to which the neighborhood is subjected by the uselessness of the pump.Feb. 27: RELIEF FOR IRELAND -- A note from Hugh Jenkins Esq., treasurer of the Irish Relief Fund, acknowledges the receipt of $374.85, collected at the Cathedral on Sunday last.Feb. March 1: YOUNG SPRING -- This morning ushers the bantling into existence, and as is the case with other new borns, we may expect a succession of squalls for a month at least, after which the infant will no doubt become more interesting, and by its smiling and cooing gladden the hearts of the sons and daughters of earth.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 15, 1996
150 years ago in The SunSept. 16: We noted considerable activity in the oyster business along the Basin yesterday, giving evidence that the season for the favorite delicacy had commenced.Sept. 20: On the Point yesterday we noticed in no less than four places in the streets gangs of small boys who were kindling fires with shavings by way of amusement. This is a very dangerous sport.100 years ago in The SunSept. 18: Mr. Enoch Pratt, founder of the great public library that bears his name, died a few minutes before 9 o'clock last night at his country home, "Tivoli," on Woodbourne Avenue, Govanstown, in the eighty-ninth year of his age.Sept.
NEWS
July 9, 1996
"YOU SHALL NOT press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns! You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold!"With these words, spoken 100 years ago today, William Jennings Bryan sent the Democratic National Convention into a frenzy over an issue -- goldbugs versus silverites -- now relegated to history books. This newspaper commented it was "the first time. . . a delegate to a presidential convention has captured a presidential nomination by a single speech."And so it was. And so it is. There have been exciting convention moments since but nothing to compare with Bryan's oratory and passion.
NEWS
August 24, 1991
Solidarity DayEditor: On Aug. 31, the United Steelworkers of America will be participating in ''Solidarity Day '91,'' in Washington, D.C. This is a day for all working people to stand together and be heard as one voice, to let government and big business know that we will not be silenced.Many crucial issues are to be addressed on this day; health care reform, workers' rights, striker replacement, union busting and our commitment to achieving a better life for working families. Basic rights are sometimes taken for granted, but step back and look around, we are loosing more day by day.There are some people who can't see past the end of their nose, they figure if they don't acknowledge problems they will go away.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 5, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 31st was held in 1908. President Theodore Roosevelt chose to treat his seven and half years in office (obtaining it when William McKinley was slain) as two terms and declined to run. He favored William Howard Taft, his secretary of war, who was easily nominated.The Democrats, who had tried a conservative in 1904, after losing twice with William Jennings Bryan, went back to Bryan.Both candidates claimed to be logical successors to TR: Taft as his hand-picked choice, Bryan as an advocate of liberal policies similar to TR's progressivism.
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