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NEWS
July 13, 2006
On Thursday, June 29, 2006 MARY ELIZABETH SPURRIER (nee Justi), a resident of the Canterbury-Roland Park area of Baltimore for more than forty years, died at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a brief illness. Born August 11, 1905, she would have been 101 this year. She was the daughter of the late Charles Louis and Catherine Justi (nee Williamson) of Baltimore and the Eastern Shore. She was the devoted wife of the late Dr. Oliver Walter Spurrier and beloved mother of a daughter, Elizabeth Ann Spurrier; dear sister of the late William Holden Justi and the late Earle Williamson Justi.
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NEWS
July 13, 2006
On Thursday, June 29, 2006 MARY ELIZABETH SPURRIER (nee Justi), a resident of the Canterbury-Roland Park area of Baltimore for more than forty years, died at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a brief illness. Born August 11, 1905, she would have been 101 this year. She was the daughter of the late Charles Louis and Catherine Justi (nee Williamson) of Baltimore and the Eastern Shore. She was the devoted wife of the late Dr. Oliver Walter Spurrier and beloved mother of a daughter, Elizabeth Ann Spurrier; dear sister of the late William Holden Justi and the late Earle Williamson Justi.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | July 5, 1998
When the American Film Institute announced its list of the "greatest 100 American films of all time" last month, a collective cry went up: Great, but where can we see them on screen rather than video?Luckily, Baltimore has one of the country's few remaining revival houses dedicated to preserving our cinematic heritage by showing vintage films in an intimate theatrical setting. The Orpheum is running two of AFI's greatest films starting Monday: "On the Waterfront" (No. 8), Elia Kazan's brilliant 1954 drama starring Marlon Brando as a boxer battling union corruption; and Billy Wilder's incomparable "Sunset Boulevard" (No. 12)
NEWS
January 23, 2005
Dr. William Bourdon Holden, a retired psychiatrist and advocate of downtown living, died of a heart attack Jan. 16 at his Mount Vernon home. He was 77. Born in Cincinnati, he earned a degree at Marquette University School of Medicine and did his residency at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center, where he was also on the medical school faculty for many years. From 1959 to 1999, Dr. Holden practiced psychiatry at the 11 E. Chase St. professional building. In the late 1950s he purchased a renovated 1840s home on Tyson Street near Read Street in Mount Vernon.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 21, 2000
"U-571" is the kind of war picture that William Holden used to star in -- the kind where he rallies his co-stars (let's say Frederic March, Mickey Rooney, Alec Guinness and Don Taylor) to outsmart the enemy, manages a few sardonic cracks and never gets his hair mussed. Matthew McConaughey is no William Holden, but "U-571" still makes good use of his limited range in a World War II submarine thriller that is executed with efficiency and skill. McConaughey plays Andy Tyler, a Navy lieutenant who has just been turned down for a command of his own submarine when he is called upon by his lieutenant commander, Mike Dahlgren (Bill Paxton)
NEWS
April 7, 1993
SPRING means the return of fragile blooms, verdant lawns, warm breezes and -- at least in the last several years -- a glut of new baseball books. Of this year's many baseball tomes, one has managed to catch our attention.It's "O Holy Cow!," a collection of "poetry" by Phil "Scooter" Rizzuto, former shortstop and current broadcast announcer for the New York Yankees.The "poems," edited and arranged in free-verse form by Tom Peyer and Hart Seely, are actually brief Rizzuto monologues culled from Yankee broadcasts.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Jeanne Crain, 78, an actress who specialized in frothy comedies in the 1940s and whose career was capped by her starring role in the controversial Elia Kazan classic Pinky, died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on Sunday. Ms. Crain appeared in 64 films and many television shows during her long career, playing opposite such stars as Frank Sinatra, Kirk Douglas and William Holden. Pinky brought her only Academy Award recognition, a nomination for best actress in 1949. It was a daring film at a time when Hollywood avoided racial controversy, about a girl who passes for white in the North but faces the bitter hatred of whites after returning to her grandmother's home in the Deep South.
FEATURES
March 1, 2001
Once again, it's time for "31 Days of Oscar" on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Academy Award nominees and winners will be shown throughout March - a total of 346 films. Tonight's prime-time lineup begins at 8 p.m. with "Paper Moon" (1973), which made Tatum O'Neal a winner for her performance with real-life dad Ryan O'Neal. It's followed at 10 by 1943's "For Whom the Bell Tolls." At a glance "Gilmore Girls" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) - Lorelai's ex - and Rory's father - speeds back into town on his motorcycle.
FEATURES
March 10, 2001
An air of mystery, melancholy and muted hope pervades "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her" (8 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow, Showtime), first-time writer-director Rodrigo Garcia's carefully textured mini-portraits of women living the drama that is everyday life. The film is told as a series of five vaguely interconnected stories, with Mexican actress Elpidia Carrillo providing the common thread. Glenn Close is Elaine Keener, an M.D. who seems preoccupied with ... something. Close provides a powerful, nearly wordless performance that sets the bar high for the rest of the cast.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 22, 1992
Suppose you woke up and you were inside a movie?If the movie were "E.T" or something equally beloved, that might not be too bad, assuming you got to be a good guy.But suppose the movie was "Network," Paddy Chayefsky's corrosive 1976 satire on big media and its banalizing effects on the culture that spawned it?You'd be mad as hell. But you'd take it anyway . . . because you'd have no choice.It's not only a movie. It's America in the '90s.Indeed, no film in the post-war era has been so weirdly prescient as the great, biting and ultimately tragic "Network."
NEWS
December 16, 2003
Jeanne Crain, 78, an actress who specialized in frothy comedies in the 1940s and whose career was capped by her starring role in the controversial Elia Kazan classic Pinky, died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on Sunday. Ms. Crain appeared in 64 films and many television shows during her long career, playing opposite such stars as Frank Sinatra, Kirk Douglas and William Holden. Pinky brought her only Academy Award recognition, a nomination for best actress in 1949. It was a daring film at a time when Hollywood avoided racial controversy, about a girl who passes for white in the North but faces the bitter hatred of whites after returning to her grandmother's home in the Deep South.
FEATURES
March 10, 2001
An air of mystery, melancholy and muted hope pervades "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her" (8 p.m.-10 p.m. tomorrow, Showtime), first-time writer-director Rodrigo Garcia's carefully textured mini-portraits of women living the drama that is everyday life. The film is told as a series of five vaguely interconnected stories, with Mexican actress Elpidia Carrillo providing the common thread. Glenn Close is Elaine Keener, an M.D. who seems preoccupied with ... something. Close provides a powerful, nearly wordless performance that sets the bar high for the rest of the cast.
FEATURES
March 1, 2001
Once again, it's time for "31 Days of Oscar" on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Academy Award nominees and winners will be shown throughout March - a total of 346 films. Tonight's prime-time lineup begins at 8 p.m. with "Paper Moon" (1973), which made Tatum O'Neal a winner for her performance with real-life dad Ryan O'Neal. It's followed at 10 by 1943's "For Whom the Bell Tolls." At a glance "Gilmore Girls" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) - Lorelai's ex - and Rory's father - speeds back into town on his motorcycle.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 21, 2000
"U-571" is the kind of war picture that William Holden used to star in -- the kind where he rallies his co-stars (let's say Frederic March, Mickey Rooney, Alec Guinness and Don Taylor) to outsmart the enemy, manages a few sardonic cracks and never gets his hair mussed. Matthew McConaughey is no William Holden, but "U-571" still makes good use of his limited range in a World War II submarine thriller that is executed with efficiency and skill. McConaughey plays Andy Tyler, a Navy lieutenant who has just been turned down for a command of his own submarine when he is called upon by his lieutenant commander, Mike Dahlgren (Bill Paxton)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | July 5, 1998
When the American Film Institute announced its list of the "greatest 100 American films of all time" last month, a collective cry went up: Great, but where can we see them on screen rather than video?Luckily, Baltimore has one of the country's few remaining revival houses dedicated to preserving our cinematic heritage by showing vintage films in an intimate theatrical setting. The Orpheum is running two of AFI's greatest films starting Monday: "On the Waterfront" (No. 8), Elia Kazan's brilliant 1954 drama starring Marlon Brando as a boxer battling union corruption; and Billy Wilder's incomparable "Sunset Boulevard" (No. 12)
NEWS
April 7, 1993
SPRING means the return of fragile blooms, verdant lawns, warm breezes and -- at least in the last several years -- a glut of new baseball books. Of this year's many baseball tomes, one has managed to catch our attention.It's "O Holy Cow!," a collection of "poetry" by Phil "Scooter" Rizzuto, former shortstop and current broadcast announcer for the New York Yankees.The "poems," edited and arranged in free-verse form by Tom Peyer and Hart Seely, are actually brief Rizzuto monologues culled from Yankee broadcasts.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 22, 1992
Suppose you woke up and you were inside a movie?If the movie were "E.T" or something equally beloved, that might not be too bad, assuming you got to be a good guy.But suppose the movie was "Network," Paddy Chayefsky's corrosive 1976 satire on big media and its banalizing effects on the culture that spawned it?You'd be mad as hell. But you'd take it anyway . . . because you'd have no choice.It's not only a movie. It's America in the '90s.Indeed, no film in the post-war era has been so weirdly prescient as the great, biting and ultimately tragic "Network."
NEWS
January 23, 2005
Dr. William Bourdon Holden, a retired psychiatrist and advocate of downtown living, died of a heart attack Jan. 16 at his Mount Vernon home. He was 77. Born in Cincinnati, he earned a degree at Marquette University School of Medicine and did his residency at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center, where he was also on the medical school faculty for many years. From 1959 to 1999, Dr. Holden practiced psychiatry at the 11 E. Chase St. professional building. In the late 1950s he purchased a renovated 1840s home on Tyson Street near Read Street in Mount Vernon.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 22, 1992
Suppose you woke up and you were inside a movie?If the movie were "E.T" or something equally beloved, that might not be too bad, assuming you got to be a good guy.But suppose the movie was "Network," Paddy Chayefsky's corrosive 1976 satire on big media and its banalizing effects on the culture that spawned it?You'd be mad as hell. But you'd take it anyway . . . because you'd have no choice.It's not only a movie. It's America in the '90s.Indeed, no film in the post-war era has been so weirdly prescient as the great, biting and ultimately tragic "Network."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 22, 1992
Suppose you woke up and you were inside a movie?If the movie were "E.T" or something equally beloved, that might not be too bad, assuming you got to be a good guy.But suppose the movie was "Network," Paddy Chayefsky's corrosive 1976 satire on big media and its banalizing effects on the culture that spawned it?You'd be mad as hell. But you'd take it anyway . . . because you'd have no choice.It's not only a movie. It's America in the '90s.Indeed, no film in the post-war era has been so weirdly prescient as the great, biting and ultimately tragic "Network."
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