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William Henry Harrison

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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Old Tippecanoe, the ninth president of the United States, was born 240 years ago today. He remains the president with the shortest term in office, having died a month after his inauguration. An elderly gentleman, he insisted on making a prolonged and unremarkable inaugural address in bad weather, caught a bad cold, and succumbed, bequeathing executive authority to John Tyler, "His Accidency," who would later distinguish himself as the only former president to make his allegiance to the Confederacy.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Old Tippecanoe, the ninth president of the United States, was born 240 years ago today. He remains the president with the shortest term in office, having died a month after his inauguration. An elderly gentleman, he insisted on making a prolonged and unremarkable inaugural address in bad weather, caught a bad cold, and succumbed, bequeathing executive authority to John Tyler, "His Accidency," who would later distinguish himself as the only former president to make his allegiance to the Confederacy.
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NEWS
January 25, 1995
Albertis S. Harrison Jr., 88, who was Virginia's governor from 1962 to 1966 while the state struggled with school desegregation, died Monday in Lawrenceville, Va. He was related to Benjamin Harrison, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and two presidents, William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison.Arthur Cohen, 74, an engineer who helped to develop the proximity fuse detonator, a battlefield device that caused enemy missiles to explode prematurely, saving many soldiers' lives in World War II, died of cancer on Jan. 12. He resided in Flemington, N.J.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | December 18, 2000
GEORGE W. BUSH is the third son or grandson of a president to be elected president. All so far -- fathers and heirs -- had one-term, failed presidencies. They are John and John Quincy Adams, William Henry and Benjamin Harrison, and George H.W. and George W. Bush. John Adams' immortality as a Founding Father obscures his mediocrity as president. He was elected in 1796 after George Washington refused a third term. Adams was notable for his tilt toward Britain against France (reversed by Thomas Jefferson)
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 28, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 26th was held in 1888, by which time the tariff had become the dominant issue.President Cleveland and the Democrats wanted to revise it down. The Republicans, the party of businessmen who wanted the price of foreign products kept high, opposed this.An innovation of this campaign was the use of private Republican clubs organized by industrialists to finance the campaign.The Republicans nominated Indiana Sen. Benjamin Harrison, a war hero and grandson of President William Henry Harrison.
NEWS
By GERSON G. EISENBERG | August 1, 1991
Comparing the 40 individuals who have reached the presidency,one is struck less by what they have in common than by their differences.Consider education. George Washington, Zachary Taylor, Andrew Jackson, Millard Fillmore, Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson had no formal schooling, while Harry Truman had only a public-school education. This is hardly surprising considering the few centers of higher education in the earlier days of the republic.On the other hand, two-thirds of our presidents were college graduates or had some college education.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 10, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 14th was held in 1840. It was more like today's than the ones preceding it. There were campaign songs, paraphernalia, slogans, parades. The Whigs settled on a single nominee in 1840, one of their regional candidates of 1836, 67-year-old William Henry Harrison, a military hero from the War of 1812. He was presented, falsely, as a simple man who would like nothing better than sitting in a rude log cabin and drinking cider.Meant to be an insult (it originated in a Baltimore newspaper)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | January 4, 1992
"OVERLOOKED: 1988 version: Martin Van Buren was the lastsitting vice president elected president. 1992 version: When he ran for re-election 4 years later he lost."That is from The Hotline, a daily electronic "briefing" -- news and views collected from the nation's media -- for political journalists.Martin Van Buren is an interesting president for George Bush to consider. He lost his re-election bid in 1840 in large part because of a recession, brought on in large part by a credit crunch and a trade imbalance with an island nation (in this case, England)
NEWS
January 20, 1993
THE NATION'S new president is not known for short speeches. But no president is likely to repeat the most notorious inaugural speech ever -- the one-hour-forty-minute ramble of the luckless William Henry Harrison, who took office March 4, 1841. Nominated as a figurehead by a cynical Whig party, Mr. Harrison fell for the heroic campaign rhetoric the party put out about him -- and it killed him. On a raw and windy day, he insisted on making a two-hour trip to the Capitol on a white horse, bareheaded and without an overcoat.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 9, 1993
Simon Says:Women who wear scarves well are always admired by other women.*If it weren't for weddings, there'd be no reason for electric woks.*Don't bet on Kurt Schmoke running for governor in 1994. The odds are no better than 50-50. True, that's better odds than you can get playing Keno, but Keno is so much more fun.If he doesn't run, Prince George's County Executive Parris Glendening will be smiling because of all the support he'll pick up that would have gone to Schmoke.Frowning will be William Donald Schaefer, who probably wants to run for mayor of Baltimore in 1995, but would have a tough time unseating Schmoke and might abandon the idea.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 12, 1995
BILL CLINTON has now vetoed more bills -- one -- than John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore and James A. Garfield combined!But, with the exception of Garfield, who died a few months after being inaugurated, Clinton has vetoed fewer than every president since Fillmore left office in 1853.The presidential veto was not a popular political or governmental tool in the early days of the nation.It was debated at length in the Constitutional Convention.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Albertis S. Harrison Jr., 88, who was Virginia's governor from 1962 to 1966 while the state struggled with school desegregation, died Monday in Lawrenceville, Va. He was related to Benjamin Harrison, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and two presidents, William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison.Arthur Cohen, 74, an engineer who helped to develop the proximity fuse detonator, a battlefield device that caused enemy missiles to explode prematurely, saving many soldiers' lives in World War II, died of cancer on Jan. 12. He resided in Flemington, N.J.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 9, 1993
Simon Says:Women who wear scarves well are always admired by other women.*If it weren't for weddings, there'd be no reason for electric woks.*Don't bet on Kurt Schmoke running for governor in 1994. The odds are no better than 50-50. True, that's better odds than you can get playing Keno, but Keno is so much more fun.If he doesn't run, Prince George's County Executive Parris Glendening will be smiling because of all the support he'll pick up that would have gone to Schmoke.Frowning will be William Donald Schaefer, who probably wants to run for mayor of Baltimore in 1995, but would have a tough time unseating Schmoke and might abandon the idea.
NEWS
January 20, 1993
THE NATION'S new president is not known for short speeches. But no president is likely to repeat the most notorious inaugural speech ever -- the one-hour-forty-minute ramble of the luckless William Henry Harrison, who took office March 4, 1841. Nominated as a figurehead by a cynical Whig party, Mr. Harrison fell for the heroic campaign rhetoric the party put out about him -- and it killed him. On a raw and windy day, he insisted on making a two-hour trip to the Capitol on a white horse, bareheaded and without an overcoat.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 28, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 26th was held in 1888, by which time the tariff had become the dominant issue.President Cleveland and the Democrats wanted to revise it down. The Republicans, the party of businessmen who wanted the price of foreign products kept high, opposed this.An innovation of this campaign was the use of private Republican clubs organized by industrialists to finance the campaign.The Republicans nominated Indiana Sen. Benjamin Harrison, a war hero and grandson of President William Henry Harrison.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 10, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 14th was held in 1840. It was more like today's than the ones preceding it. There were campaign songs, paraphernalia, slogans, parades. The Whigs settled on a single nominee in 1840, one of their regional candidates of 1836, 67-year-old William Henry Harrison, a military hero from the War of 1812. He was presented, falsely, as a simple man who would like nothing better than sitting in a rude log cabin and drinking cider.Meant to be an insult (it originated in a Baltimore newspaper)
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | December 18, 2000
GEORGE W. BUSH is the third son or grandson of a president to be elected president. All so far -- fathers and heirs -- had one-term, failed presidencies. They are John and John Quincy Adams, William Henry and Benjamin Harrison, and George H.W. and George W. Bush. John Adams' immortality as a Founding Father obscures his mediocrity as president. He was elected in 1796 after George Washington refused a third term. Adams was notable for his tilt toward Britain against France (reversed by Thomas Jefferson)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 12, 1995
BILL CLINTON has now vetoed more bills -- one -- than John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, William Henry Harrison, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore and James A. Garfield combined!But, with the exception of Garfield, who died a few months after being inaugurated, Clinton has vetoed fewer than every president since Fillmore left office in 1853.The presidential veto was not a popular political or governmental tool in the early days of the nation.It was debated at length in the Constitutional Convention.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN | January 4, 1992
"OVERLOOKED: 1988 version: Martin Van Buren was the lastsitting vice president elected president. 1992 version: When he ran for re-election 4 years later he lost."That is from The Hotline, a daily electronic "briefing" -- news and views collected from the nation's media -- for political journalists.Martin Van Buren is an interesting president for George Bush to consider. He lost his re-election bid in 1840 in large part because of a recession, brought on in large part by a credit crunch and a trade imbalance with an island nation (in this case, England)
NEWS
By GERSON G. EISENBERG | August 1, 1991
Comparing the 40 individuals who have reached the presidency,one is struck less by what they have in common than by their differences.Consider education. George Washington, Zachary Taylor, Andrew Jackson, Millard Fillmore, Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson had no formal schooling, while Harry Truman had only a public-school education. This is hardly surprising considering the few centers of higher education in the earlier days of the republic.On the other hand, two-thirds of our presidents were college graduates or had some college education.
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