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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | May 25, 2007
Bug is being marketed as a horror movie, but it isn't a horror movie per se, although it has a number of horrific moments, and it burrows under your skin the way genuinely disturbing art sometimes does. Based on Tracy Letts' 2004 off-Broadway play, Bug was directed by William Friedkin, who made The Exorcist (and The French Connection and To Live and Die in L.A.) but more recently brought us The Hunted and Rules of Engagement and The Guardian, which was about an evil tree that eats babies.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
The 25th anniversary version of Blade Runner comes to Baltimore's Senator Theatre next Friday. Tagged as The Final Cut, this is supposed to be the absolutely, positively, this-time-we-really-mean-it, definitive version of Ridley Scott's 1982 film. Let's hope so. Nothing against Blade Runner, which is a fascinating film, the happy result of a visionary director (Scott) being let loose on the work of a startlingly hallucinatory writer (Philip K. Dick, who wrote the source material, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
For just about an hour, "Blue Chips" seems to shape up as a smart, tough, cynical look at big-time college basketball as a hustling coach (played by Nick Nolte) tries to upgrade his faltering program by importing three blue-chip prospects.But then it turns into an extended version of Edvard Munch's "The Scream," while Nolte, consumed with guilt about the under-the-table payments he's tacitly permitted, runs around clasping his hands against his ears and opening his mouth in primal agony like the twisted Munch-kin of the famous painting.
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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,McClatchy-Tribune | May 25, 2007
Bug is being marketed as a horror movie, but it isn't a horror movie per se, although it has a number of horrific moments, and it burrows under your skin the way genuinely disturbing art sometimes does. Based on Tracy Letts' 2004 off-Broadway play, Bug was directed by William Friedkin, who made The Exorcist (and The French Connection and To Live and Die in L.A.) but more recently brought us The Hunted and Rules of Engagement and The Guardian, which was about an evil tree that eats babies.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 25, 1997
Can the same script make for a great film twice, even when the movies are shot 40 years apart? Watch Showtime tonight and find out.First comes the pay-cable channel's 1997 version of "Twelve Angry Men" (9 p.m.-10: 40 p.m.), which sticks 12 men in a jury room on the hottest day of summer and lets them have at it. All but 1 are convinced the defendant -- a Hispanic teen charged with murdering his father -- is guilty. Only one, in this case Jack Lemmon, believes in his innocence; yet that one juror's intransigence keeps the rest from going home, and his attempts to sway their opinions open all sorts of cans of worms.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Cut. Slash. Kill. The Hunted has lots of that, but not much else. An ode to the nobility of killing things with your hands and eschewing such unfair accoutrements as guns (sharp things apparently are OK, so long as they're crafted by hand), the movie makes almost no sense whatsoever and should be seen only by those who have long wondered who would win a knife fight between stars Tommy Lee Jones and Benicio Del Toro. Director William Friedkin seems to be making some statement here about how violence is OK, maybe even glorious, so long as it's inflicted mano a mano.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
The 25th anniversary version of Blade Runner comes to Baltimore's Senator Theatre next Friday. Tagged as The Final Cut, this is supposed to be the absolutely, positively, this-time-we-really-mean-it, definitive version of Ridley Scott's 1982 film. Let's hope so. Nothing against Blade Runner, which is a fascinating film, the happy result of a visionary director (Scott) being let loose on the work of a startlingly hallucinatory writer (Philip K. Dick, who wrote the source material, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 1, 1995
Overnight sensation. Taboo-breaking TV sex symbol. Ego gone Hollywood. Betrayer of fans.David Caruso has had so many labels attached to him in the last 18 months, he's worried that people don't even remember why he's a celebrity in the first place.Mr. Caruso hopes that the public focus so diffused by his short, sensational stint on "NYPD Blue" will be resharpened on his acting abilities with last week's release of "Kiss of Death." Based on a 1940s film noir, the movie showcases Mr. Caruso as a small-time criminal trying to go straight while a ruthless district attorney forces him to infiltrate a violent car-theft ring.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 14, 1997
The paths of religion and science converge during a pair of shows on A&E tonight.On "Ancient Mysteries" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m.), Leonard Nimoy and company visit Lourdes, the famous French village where the Virgin Mary appeared to a peasant girl named Bernadette in 1858. Each year, millions of pilgrims visit the shrine, convinced that partaking of the scared waters will help cure them of their ills. Are they wasting their time? Or are miracle cures really happening?Then, "The Unexplained" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 2 a.m.-3 a.m.)
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By Los Angeles Times | April 2, 2009
Series Survivor: Tocantins: : A fake immunity idol is introduced into the game. (8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) ER: : This one-hour retrospective features clips from the past 15 seasons, along with interviews with past and present cast members. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: : Academy Award winner William Friedkin directs the 200th episode of the series. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) ER: : Alexis Bledel and Ernest Borgnine guest star in the series finale, which features the appearance of some former series stars.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Cut. Slash. Kill. The Hunted has lots of that, but not much else. An ode to the nobility of killing things with your hands and eschewing such unfair accoutrements as guns (sharp things apparently are OK, so long as they're crafted by hand), the movie makes almost no sense whatsoever and should be seen only by those who have long wondered who would win a knife fight between stars Tommy Lee Jones and Benicio Del Toro. Director William Friedkin seems to be making some statement here about how violence is OK, maybe even glorious, so long as it's inflicted mano a mano.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 25, 1997
Can the same script make for a great film twice, even when the movies are shot 40 years apart? Watch Showtime tonight and find out.First comes the pay-cable channel's 1997 version of "Twelve Angry Men" (9 p.m.-10: 40 p.m.), which sticks 12 men in a jury room on the hottest day of summer and lets them have at it. All but 1 are convinced the defendant -- a Hispanic teen charged with murdering his father -- is guilty. Only one, in this case Jack Lemmon, believes in his innocence; yet that one juror's intransigence keeps the rest from going home, and his attempts to sway their opinions open all sorts of cans of worms.
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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 1, 1995
Overnight sensation. Taboo-breaking TV sex symbol. Ego gone Hollywood. Betrayer of fans.David Caruso has had so many labels attached to him in the last 18 months, he's worried that people don't even remember why he's a celebrity in the first place.Mr. Caruso hopes that the public focus so diffused by his short, sensational stint on "NYPD Blue" will be resharpened on his acting abilities with last week's release of "Kiss of Death." Based on a 1940s film noir, the movie showcases Mr. Caruso as a small-time criminal trying to go straight while a ruthless district attorney forces him to infiltrate a violent car-theft ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
For just about an hour, "Blue Chips" seems to shape up as a smart, tough, cynical look at big-time college basketball as a hustling coach (played by Nick Nolte) tries to upgrade his faltering program by importing three blue-chip prospects.But then it turns into an extended version of Edvard Munch's "The Scream," while Nolte, consumed with guilt about the under-the-table payments he's tacitly permitted, runs around clasping his hands against his ears and opening his mouth in primal agony like the twisted Munch-kin of the famous painting.
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May 25, 2007
Last week, Shrek The Third, another in a series of popular animation films, opened in theaters. What's your favorite fairy-tale movie and why? WHAT YOU SAY My favorite fairy-tale movie? Well, there was Cinderella, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, The Little Mermaid, Pocahontas ... I could go on and on, but my favorite was The Lion King. The animation was perfect, as were the voice-over characters, but the story line was so poignant which made the entire movie quite unforgettable. Freda Garelick, Baltimore My all-time favorite is, and always will be, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2007
Writer-director James Gray sets We Own the Night in 1988. The title comes from the late-'80s motto of the NYPD's street- crimes unit, and a key location is a garish dance club where coke flows like Coke. But at heart, Gray wants to make the best American movie of 1958. This hoary melodrama about father and son New York City policemen (Robert Duvall and Mark Wahlberg) and the black-sheep, club-manager brother (Joaquin Phoenix) who helps them defeat the Russian mob is a throwback to the time when New York-based directors, bred on live TV, weren't shy or all that skillful about mixing moral earnestness with urban grit and method-acting anguish.
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