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By Vincent Fitzpatrick and Vincent Fitzpatrick,Contributing Writer | October 14, 1993
William Faulkner, the South's finest novelist, was fascinated by the history of his native land. Jean-Paul Sartre once compared a Faulkner character to a passenger in a speeding car. Only instead of looking forward into the future, the character faces backward, gazing with wonder and dismay at the past as it hurtles by.Southern history helped to shape Faulkner's life and art. He was born in Mississippi in 1897 -- roughly a generation after the surrender at...
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Years ago, before heading to campus to sit in a library carrel and pretend to scholarship, I would listen to Hughes Rudd's dry commentaries on the CBS morning news program.  So when I saw in a bookstore a copy of his My Escape from the CIA (and into CBS) , it was irresistible. Here are the three opening paragraphs of "The Death of William Faulkner," which he published in the Saturday Evening Post  in 1963: He had been in pain for several weeks, wearing a brace to support the injured back, and people around the square said maybe that was why he started drinking again.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
OXFORD, Miss. -- When he finally got started, sculptor William N. Beckwith worked in a kind of fever.In a cluttered studio that looks like a mechanic's garage, he went day and night, seven days a week, for eight weeks. Alone with photographs and impressions of a writer dead 35 years, Beckwith worked under a ruthless deadline on his slightly larger than life-size figure.Out of the clay came William Faulkner. The creator of Yoknapatawpha County took shape on a bench, seated with his legs crossed, holding a pipe.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | October 18, 2006
Rosamond Purcell arrived on the photography scene in Boston in the mid-1970s with exquisitely observed still lifes made with a black-and-white Polaroid camera. Her recent works, now on view at the Kathleen Ewing Gallery in Washington, are about a particular kind of creative destruction - that which occurs when the present willy-nilly overwhelms the past. Hers is a sad and serious vision that seems imbued with nostalgia and regret. The exhibition is drawn from Purcell's most recent publication, Bookworm (2006)
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | September 21, 1997
That William Faulkner novel is around the house somewhere. Or so Alfreda Hughes believes. Truth is, she hasn't seen it recently and hadn't given it much thought until a reporter showed up at her home asking about Faulkner and the South and what she knows and what she would like to know. It has been enough to know what she has always known, growing up black in a segregated Baltimore: that she and this famous American writer, this white man from the Deep South, share a common ancestor, a connection rooted in slavery.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
William Faulkner, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: As a postmaster at the University of Mississippi's post office from 1921 to 1924, Faulkner often ignored customers and tossed some of their mail in the garbage. He entertained friends on the job, even inviting them to read patron's magazines, which he displayed in a "reading room."Source: "The Book of Lists," David Wallechinsky and Amy Wallace
NEWS
November 7, 1990
Jack Cofield, who along with his father photographed novelist William Faulkner, died Monday after an extended illness in Oxford, Miss. He was 63. His book, "William Faulkner: The Cofield Collection," included his internationally celebrated photographs that chronicled the life of the reclusive, Nobel Prize-winning author. Mr. Cofield's father, "Colonel" J. R. Cofield, took some of the photographs. Much of the collection was reprinted from scrapbooks and contained personalized captions by J. R. Cofield.
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By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | November 15, 1998
William Faulkner(1897-1962)Faulkner often flew himself to and from Hollywood and his farm in Mississippi, having his own pilot's license. His most enduring films include "To Have and Have Not," "The Big Sleep," and Howard Hawks's epic "Land of the Pharaohs."He wrote "The Marble Faun," "Soldiers' Pay" and later "Sartoris" which introduces Yoknapatawpha County, the fictitious locale for all his later fiction."The Sound and the Fury," "As I Lay Dying" and "Light in August" are among Faulkner's most memorable books.
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By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
Comparing the two defendants before him to "Nazi prison guards," Baltimore Circuit Judge John N. Prevas sentenced William Faulkner and Richard James yesterday to three consecutive life sentences without parole for the execution-style murder of three lifelong best friends last year. "When I look into the vacant eyes of William Faulkner and Richard James, I see the vacant eyes of Nazi prison guards who went home at night and kissed their children," Prevas said. Faulkner and James, both 23, were found guilty last month of 30 criminal charges in connection with the July murders of Thomas Barnes Jr., Frederick Jenkins and ElJermaine Street.
NEWS
May 13, 1993
EDITOR, author and teacher Irving Howe, who died last week at age 72, was the quintessential New York intellectual. He had opinions about everything, from politics to literature to popular culture to religion, which he expressed in vigorous prose sharpened with broad learning and wit.He was the founder and editor of Dissent magazine, one of the "little magazines" of the post-war years whose influence reached well beyond its modest circulation of 10,000 subscribers....
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Whether his words were spoken or written, no 20th-century storyteller could bring the American Civil War to life like Shelby Foote, the novelist and reluctant television star who died Monday night in Memphis, Tenn., at age 88. As a writer, Mr. Foote spent 20 years, 1954 to 1974, crafting The Civil War: A Narrative, three volumes and 3,000 pages that the Modern Library, in 1999, ranked No. 15 among the century's best English-language works of nonfiction. Though popular, the books did not make Mr. Foote a household name.
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By Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley and Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
Nobel laureate Saul Bellow, the towering American literary figure whose work reflected the angst, yearnings and moral ambiguity of post-World War II existence, died yesterday at 89. Mr. Bellow's friend and attorney, Walter Pozen, said that the writer of such vibrant, darkly comic works as Herzog and Humboldt's Gift, had been in declining health but was "wonderfully sharp to the end." Mr. Bellow died in Brookline, Mass., his wife and daughter at his side. Mr. Bellow was perhaps the most acclaimed of a remarkable collection of postwar American Jewish writers that included Bernard Malamud, Joseph Heller, Philip Roth and Cynthia Ozick.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
Comparing the two defendants before him to "Nazi prison guards," Baltimore Circuit Judge John N. Prevas sentenced William Faulkner and Richard James yesterday to three consecutive life sentences without parole for the execution-style murder of three lifelong best friends last year. "When I look into the vacant eyes of William Faulkner and Richard James, I see the vacant eyes of Nazi prison guards who went home at night and kissed their children," Prevas said. Faulkner and James, both 23, were found guilty last month of 30 criminal charges in connection with the July murders of Thomas Barnes Jr., Frederick Jenkins and ElJermaine Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2001
Writers' reputations are such fragile things. They rise and fall for reasons that are often difficult to decipher. At the time of his death in 1940, F. Scott Fitzgerald was not generally regarded as a writer whose work would endure. The obituaries dismissed him as a Jazz Age curiosity whose stories were as dated as the Charleston. Likewise, William Faulkner saw many of his books go out of print in the 1940s, and worried that his work would soon die with him. How well will the literary judgments of today hold up?
FEATURES
By A Reader's Guide to Twentieth Century Writers | November 15, 1998
William Faulkner(1897-1962)Faulkner often flew himself to and from Hollywood and his farm in Mississippi, having his own pilot's license. His most enduring films include "To Have and Have Not," "The Big Sleep," and Howard Hawks's epic "Land of the Pharaohs."He wrote "The Marble Faun," "Soldiers' Pay" and later "Sartoris" which introduces Yoknapatawpha County, the fictitious locale for all his later fiction."The Sound and the Fury," "As I Lay Dying" and "Light in August" are among Faulkner's most memorable books.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | September 21, 1997
That William Faulkner novel is around the house somewhere. Or so Alfreda Hughes believes. Truth is, she hasn't seen it recently and hadn't given it much thought until a reporter showed up at her home asking about Faulkner and the South and what she knows and what she would like to know. It has been enough to know what she has always known, growing up black in a segregated Baltimore: that she and this famous American writer, this white man from the Deep South, share a common ancestor, a connection rooted in slavery.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Years ago, before heading to campus to sit in a library carrel and pretend to scholarship, I would listen to Hughes Rudd's dry commentaries on the CBS morning news program.  So when I saw in a bookstore a copy of his My Escape from the CIA (and into CBS) , it was irresistible. Here are the three opening paragraphs of "The Death of William Faulkner," which he published in the Saturday Evening Post  in 1963: He had been in pain for several weeks, wearing a brace to support the injured back, and people around the square said maybe that was why he started drinking again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | July 8, 2001
Writers' reputations are such fragile things. They rise and fall for reasons that are often difficult to decipher. At the time of his death in 1940, F. Scott Fitzgerald was not generally regarded as a writer whose work would endure. The obituaries dismissed him as a Jazz Age curiosity whose stories were as dated as the Charleston. Likewise, William Faulkner saw many of his books go out of print in the 1940s, and worried that his work would soon die with him. How well will the literary judgments of today hold up?
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
OXFORD, Miss. -- When he finally got started, sculptor William N. Beckwith worked in a kind of fever.In a cluttered studio that looks like a mechanic's garage, he went day and night, seven days a week, for eight weeks. Alone with photographs and impressions of a writer dead 35 years, Beckwith worked under a ruthless deadline on his slightly larger than life-size figure.Out of the clay came William Faulkner. The creator of Yoknapatawpha County took shape on a bench, seated with his legs crossed, holding a pipe.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
William Faulkner, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist: As a postmaster at the University of Mississippi's post office from 1921 to 1924, Faulkner often ignored customers and tossed some of their mail in the garbage. He entertained friends on the job, even inviting them to read patron's magazines, which he displayed in a "reading room."Source: "The Book of Lists," David Wallechinsky and Amy Wallace
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