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William Donald Schaefer

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By Laura Vozzella | May 25, 2011
William Donald Schaefer remembered many people in his will, but only one mermaid. Karen Blair , a longtime aide who received $10,000 in the will made public last week, was a City Hall secretary in August 1978 when the city was about to break ground for the aquarium. A model had been hired to appear as a mermaid, but she showed up that day without the requisite fresh-from-the-sea look. “She came in and she had all this make-up on and her hair was all piled up high,” Blair said.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the money race against potential future political opponents with more than $350,000 on hand, a review of the most recent campaign finance reports shows. Rawlings-Blake, who is up for re-election in November 2016, raised about $15,000 in the most recent reporting period, which ran from June 9 to Aug. 19. The filings were due Aug. 26. While potential mayoral contenders are keeping their plans close to the vest, political observers say the filings reveal others who might be considering a run for the city's top elected post.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
William Donald Schaefer would have loved Maryland Day this year. It's all about him! A year after of his death, Maryland Historical Society will celebrate Schaefer's memory Thursday with a roast. They'll also be showing off a few Schaefer artifacts including the famous striped swimsuit he wore for that dip at Baltimore's National Aquarium and the rubber ducky he brought along for the swim. The roast will be at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St. 6 p.m. Tickets are $30 and it could be worth every penny -- and not just to see the bathing suit.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
We write as eyewitnesses to the agony of the Colts' departure in 1984 ( "Colts fans will never forget the day their beloved team left Baltimore, 30 years ago," March 28). Today's Ravens fan should never take for granted committed local ownership coupled with steady, capable management. By contrast, the Baltimore Colts franchise was an utter shambles by 1984. Former governor and Baltimore City Mayor William Donald Schaefer was, at best, a casual sports fan. Far more than most, however, he grasped the tangible and intangible benefits that professional sports franchises brought to Baltimore and to Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 19, 2011
Marylanders have taken to Twitter this morning to remember William Donald Schaefer, the iconic Baltimore mayor, Maryland governor and comptroller. He was 89 when he passed away yesterday.  Here's a sampling of what they're saying. Tweet to us @bthesite to have your thoughts included.   •  MMMcDermott   Here's to Don  Schaefer : the greatest mayor in the greatest city in America. If there are potholes in heaven, there won't be for long. •  MMMcDermott :  H.L. Mencken's gonna have someone to talk to - whether he likes it or not. Rest easy, Mayor Schaefer •  fhyrew   William Donald will be best remembered for his candor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011
A tiny church tucked inside Patapsco Valley State Park dedicates a pew Sunday to one of its most famous former congregants, the late William Donald Schaefer. Gary Memorial United Methodist Church has just 80 worshipers most Sundays, but for many years, one of them was the former mayor, governor and comptroller. Schaefer found his way to the stone church in the woods when the pastor was Luther Starnes, his former secretary of human resources. He left Gary Memorial $10,000 in his will.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
We write as eyewitnesses to the agony of the Colts' departure in 1984 ( "Colts fans will never forget the day their beloved team left Baltimore, 30 years ago," March 28). Today's Ravens fan should never take for granted committed local ownership coupled with steady, capable management. By contrast, the Baltimore Colts franchise was an utter shambles by 1984. Former governor and Baltimore City Mayor William Donald Schaefer was, at best, a casual sports fan. Far more than most, however, he grasped the tangible and intangible benefits that professional sports franchises brought to Baltimore and to Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 18, 2011
William Donald Schaefer, the dominant political figure of the last half-century of Maryland history, died Monday after a "do-it-now" career that changed the face of Baltimore while bringing a new burst of energy to the city he loved. Mr. Schaefer was 89. In four terms as mayor and two as governor, he was a champion of big projects that transformed Baltimore: Harborplace, Camden Yards, the National Aquarium, the Convention Center and the light rail among them. Yet he was also intensely involved with the mundane details of city neighborhoods.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | August 31, 2008
Fells Point is about to lose a celebrity, somebody famous for jumping into a pool. Michael Phelps is still headed there, but William Donald Schaefer is on his way out. The former mayor, governor, comptroller and seal-pool dipper just put his Lancaster Street rowhouse on the market for $225,000. The 2BR, 1BA built in 1820 has a waaay outdated kitchen but unbeatable political provenance, even if Schaefer never really lived there. Though never accused of being a material guy - Schaefer adores fast food and political-convention freebies - he collects houses like John McCain.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 11, 2014
I have been scratching around for something from the annals of Maryland politics that matches that bizarre story out of New Jersey, but I just don't have it. Nothing beats Republican Gov. Chris Christie's aides conspiring to cause a four-day traffic jam on the Jersey side of the George Washington Bridge, in the town whose Democratic mayor did not endorse Christie in the last election. I compared notes with numerous connoisseurs of Maryland political history, and we just can't find anything that comes close, in scale and strangeness, to Bridgegate.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
She had won a string of beauty pageants - and was the original St. Pauli Girl of beer advertising fame - so Debbie Walker, a blond model from Washington, D.C., was accustomed to her fair share of attention. But she'd never seen anything like the morning of July 15, 1981. She had to wear a skin-tight, sequined costume with a 15-foot train for that gig. A team of frogmen carried her across a makeshift pond and placed her on a rock. And as cameras from media outlets around the world clicked, flashed and rolled, three seals swam over to pay her a visit, followed by an equally frisky mayor of Baltimore, William Donald Schaefer.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot posted this letter to supporters Tuesday on his website. Dear Supporter,   As we approach the heart of the holiday season and the end of 2012, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continued friendship. Indeed, I have so much to be thankful for this year - from my good health and wonderful family, to the support of so many good friends and the opportunity to serve the people of Maryland in what is undoubtedly the best job I have ever had.   In that spirit of sincere gratitude, I would also like to let you know that I have decided to seek re-election as Comptroller of Maryland in 2014.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Doris J. Spriggs, a former Social Security Administration specialist who later became an aide to six Baltimore mayors, died Tuesday of heart failure at Mercy Medical Center. The longtime Edmondson Village resident was 79. "Doris was really one of the characters at City Hall and was such a part of all of our work. She loved the city and loved what we were doing," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "As a volunteer, she put in more hours than the people who work there full time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
William Donald Schaefer sang Baltimore's praises loudly, so it's only fitting that a new musical should be singing his. The title of "Do It Now!" — music by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra member Jonathan Jensen, book by Baltimore-born playwright Rich Espey — comes from Schaefer's signature phrase during his 1971-1987 tenure as mayor of the city. The musical, which gets a public reading Sunday at Theatre Project , remains a work in progress, but the focus on Schaefer's Baltimore career is firmly settled.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
A Las Vegas man who claims the estate of William Donald Schaefer owes him $28,000 for restaurant checks he picked up and time he spent visiting with the former governor and comptroller for five years lost another round in court on Monday. Michael Schaefer, who is no relation to the former Baltimore mayor, was appealing last year's decision by the Baltimore County Orphan's Court to reject the claim. Circuit Court Judge Dana M. Levitz on Monday ruled that there was no evidence that the former governor, who died last April, agreed to pay for Michael Schaefer's time or compensate him for restaurant meals, and no verification of the $28,000 sum. Schaefer -- who once owned a small downtown Baltimore hotel and now lives in Las Vegas -- said after the 30-minute trial in which he acted as both attorney and sole witness that he would pursue the case to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
William Donald Schaefer would have loved Maryland Day this year. It's all about him! A year after of his death, Maryland Historical Society will celebrate Schaefer's memory Thursday with a roast. They'll also be showing off a few Schaefer artifacts including the famous striped swimsuit he wore for that dip at Baltimore's National Aquarium and the rubber ducky he brought along for the swim. The roast will be at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St. 6 p.m. Tickets are $30 and it could be worth every penny -- and not just to see the bathing suit.
SPORTS
December 16, 2011
Baltimore and/or Maryland has very limited experience when it comes to automobile racing as compared to all our surrounding states. Look at the Formula One project that hopes to get underway next year in Austin, Texas. Or you may want to look to the cost incurred for seven races in Indianapolis. Then you can look at Richmond, Va., Dover, Del., and Pocono, Penn., for a NASCAR flavor. And then publish comparison findings. I think, in general, you had some very inexperienced promoters willing to accept inflated costs by different Baltimore authorities.
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