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William Clark

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NEWS
January 11, 2005
On Sunday, January 9, 2005, WILLIAM CLARK WILBURN, age 81, formerly of Catonsville, MD; beloved husband of the late Elizabeth R. Wilburn. He was a former employee of the State Motor Vehicle Administration. Surviving are two sisters, Vera C. Mc Kenzie and Elva Beebe, three nephews, Rodney H. Mc Kenzie and wife Bonnie, Wayne L. Mc Kenzie and wife Sandy, Ronald Holder and wife Nancy and niece Ellen Ann Kline and husband Roy, numerous great nieces and great nephews. Friends may call at the Olin L. Molesworth P.A., Funeral Home, 26401 Ridge Road, Damascus, MD, on Friday, January 14 from 10 A.M. until funeral services begin at 11 A.M. Interment will follow in Crestlawn Memorial Gardens, Marriottsville, MD.
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NEWS
September 9, 2009
William Clark Cooke, Jr No service will be held.
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NEWS
September 9, 2009
William Clark Cooke, Jr No service will be held.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
WILLIAM CLARK HILL 1922-2005, a former resident of Arbutus, MD, passed away on July 11, 2005, after a lengthy illness. Known as "Bill" or "WC" during his 42 year career as a locomotive fireman and engineer with the B&O, C&O, and CSX railroad, he particularly enjoyed the steam engines in use when he began working. Having been born and raised on a farm in Indiana, he transferred his love of working with farm horses to the "iron horse". For 29 years he served as Secretary-Treasurer of Division 97 of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Somewhere in the mud of the Patuxent River is the answer to a 186-year-old mystery, and Robert Reyes believes he has found a clue that could crack the case. So does William Clark. Reyes is a management analyst with the U.S. Postal Service. Clark manages the Calvert County Soil Conservation District. Both share a passion for the strange and baffling matter of the Barney Flotilla - a missing armada of about 17 American galleys and gunboats scuttled and burned near the end of the War of 1812.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On October 16, 2003 MARGIE T. CLARK-KELLER; beloved wife of the late Albert C. Keller; devoted mother of Joyce Adams and her husband Robert, Debbie Vogt and her husband Robert and the late William L. Clark, Jr; step-mother of Albert J. Keller, Carolyn Clark and Barbara Del Fino; loving grandmother of Margie Phipps and her husband Kenneth, Msgt. Martin Tomczewski and his wife Denise, SgtMajor Michael Tomczewski and his wife Gloria, Bobbie Jo Cotton and her husband Danny, William Clark, III and his wife Tina and Robert Vogt, Jr. and his wife Jennifer; aunt of Carol Taylorson, Connie Bohager and Joseph Clark.
NEWS
May 30, 1997
Louis J. Curley, 77, Roland Park RealtorLouis J. Curley, a retired Realtor who was active in church affairs, died Sunday at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center of complications he suffered from a fall last year. He was 77 and lived in Catonsville.He had worked for many years for the Roland Park Co.The West Baltimore native, who was educated at Loyola High School, served in the Army Air Corps during World War II.He was a communicant of the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore, and St. Mark Roman Catholic Church, 27 Melvin Ave., Catonsville, where he also was head usher and where a Mass of Christian burial was offered Wednesday.
NEWS
By Dayton Duncan | December 16, 1997
NEARLY 200 years ago, in late November of 1805, the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition huddled near the mouth of the Columbia River, having become the first American citizens to cross the continent by land.Far from home and pinned down for weeks by a relentless Pacific storm that William Clark (in his own imaginative spelling) called ''tempestous and horiable,'' the small band of explorers nevertheless found a tangible way to commemorate their remarkable achievement: They began carving their names into tree trunks -- so many times, it appears from Clark's journal entries, that few trees near their sodden campsites escaped their knife blades.
NEWS
April 21, 2003
On April 19, 2003 RITA MARY CLARK (nee Stefan) beloved wife of the late William H. Clark Sr., devoted mother of Bruce Clark, Jacob Snyder, Mary Salvino, William H. CLark Jr., and Clara Urtes, dear sister of David and Ronald Stefan. Also survived by many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 Wise Ave., on Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in the St. Luke Catholic Church on Tuesday at 10 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
On October 16, 2003 MARGIE T. CLARK-KELLER; beloved wife of the late Albert C. Keller; devoted mother of Joyce Adams and her husband Robert, Debbie Vogt and her husband Robert and the late William L. Clark, Jr; step-mother of Albert J. Keller, Carolyn Clark and Barbara Del Fino; loving grandmother of Margie Phipps and her husband Kenneth, Msgt. Martin Tomczewski and his wife Denise, SgtMajor Michael Tomczewski and his wife Gloria, Bobbie Jo Cotton and her husband Danny, William Clark, III and his wife Tina and Robert Vogt, Jr. and his wife Jennifer; aunt of Carol Taylorson, Connie Bohager and Joseph Clark.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Somewhere in the mud of the Patuxent River is the answer to a 186-year-old mystery, and Robert Reyes believes he has found a clue that could crack the case. So does William Clark. Reyes is a management analyst with the U.S. Postal Service. Clark manages the Calvert County Soil Conservation District. Both share a passion for the strange and baffling matter of the Barney Flotilla - a missing armada of about 17 American galleys and gunboats scuttled and burned near the end of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Dayton Duncan | December 16, 1997
NEARLY 200 years ago, in late November of 1805, the members of the Lewis and Clark expedition huddled near the mouth of the Columbia River, having become the first American citizens to cross the continent by land.Far from home and pinned down for weeks by a relentless Pacific storm that William Clark (in his own imaginative spelling) called ''tempestous and horiable,'' the small band of explorers nevertheless found a tangible way to commemorate their remarkable achievement: They began carving their names into tree trunks -- so many times, it appears from Clark's journal entries, that few trees near their sodden campsites escaped their knife blades.
NEWS
May 30, 1997
Louis J. Curley, 77, Roland Park RealtorLouis J. Curley, a retired Realtor who was active in church affairs, died Sunday at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation and Nursing Center of complications he suffered from a fall last year. He was 77 and lived in Catonsville.He had worked for many years for the Roland Park Co.The West Baltimore native, who was educated at Loyola High School, served in the Army Air Corps during World War II.He was a communicant of the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore, and St. Mark Roman Catholic Church, 27 Melvin Ave., Catonsville, where he also was head usher and where a Mass of Christian burial was offered Wednesday.
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