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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Though seldom emerging from the steel-and-reinforced-concrete bunker under the Baltimore Sun building on North Calvert Street from which I direct news desk operations, I do occasionally appear in public. Two such occasions are near, with one on the horizon.  Tomorrow morning and a week from tomorrow I will be at the console of the once-mighty Casavant at Memorial Episcopal Church in Bolton Hill, accompanying the congregation during the 9:30 service.  More remotely, I have been invited to present a workshop at the Editors' Association of Canada's first international conference in Toronto, June 12-14, 2015.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Though seldom emerging from the steel-and-reinforced-concrete bunker under the Baltimore Sun building on North Calvert Street from which I direct news desk operations, I do occasionally appear in public. Two such occasions are near, with one on the horizon.  Tomorrow morning and a week from tomorrow I will be at the console of the once-mighty Casavant at Memorial Episcopal Church in Bolton Hill, accompanying the congregation during the 9:30 service.  More remotely, I have been invited to present a workshop at the Editors' Association of Canada's first international conference in Toronto, June 12-14, 2015.
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FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | March 23, 1995
"Every blade of grass has over it an angel saying 'grow,' " the Talmud tells us.Nancy Willard has a penchant for angels and for God and for love. She's a highly acclaimed poet who writes about happy things -- her son, her marriage, her garden, the world around her. She chose the lines from the Talmud as an epigraph to her book "An Alphabet of Angels," and they suggest the scope of her work.She will read some of her poems at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Catonsville Community College to lead off the ninth annual Creative Writing Forum, sponsored by Baltimore County public schools and community colleges.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Dr. William Dewey Blake, a retired University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who was chairman of the department of physiology, died of cancer Sunday at his Bath, Maine, home. The former Bolton Hill resident was 94. Born in Summit, N.J., and raised in New Haven, Conn., he was the son of Dr. Francis Blake, Yale University's department of medicine chairman who was also an internist. His mother, Dorothy Blake, was a homemaker. After graduating from the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, he earned a degree at Dartmouth College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
A federal jury will begin deliberations today in a case brought by a Baltimore County police detective who suffered a seizure in 1996 and said his bosses tried to remove him from active duty after he testified on behalf of another officer with a similar problem. William Blake, a member of the department since 1987 who now works in its undercover criminal intelligence unit, has accused the department of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by ordering neurological and fitness-for-duty tests a decade after his on-the-job epileptic seizure.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
After a six-day trial, a federal jury awarded $225,000 on Wednesday to a Baltimore County police detective who suffered a seizure on the job in 1996. William Blake, 40, who remains in the department, contended in his suit against the county's government that it had violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by ordering him to submit to neurological and fitness-for-duty tests 10 years after he had the seizure. Blake, a member of the department since 1987, was pronounced ready to work three weeks after becoming ill, returned to his duties and suffered no further epileptic episodes.
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | November 22, 1990
"GRATITUDE IS the least of the virtues; the lack of it, the worst of the vices.'' The proverb is perfect Thanksgiving Day material. I take it to mean this: We are all recipients of so many favors, so many graces, that being grateful should be as natural as breathing. Not being grateful is a kind of spiritual self-asphyxiation.What many of us are especially thankful for are those special moments of love, of joy, of blissful insight which can change us forever. Though the consequences are often enduring, the experiences themselves are typically brief.
NEWS
By JUDITH B. ROSEFELD Title: "The Scorpio Illusion" Author: Robert Ludlum Publisher: Bantam Length, price: 534 pages, $23.95 and JUDITH B. ROSEFELD Title: "The Scorpio Illusion" Author: Robert Ludlum Publisher: Bantam Length, price: 534 pages, $23.95,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1993
Title: "The Tyger"All for Love"Author: William Blake; illustrated by Neil WaldmanPublisher: Harcourt, Brace and Co.Length, price: 32 pages; $15.95. All ages Would you like to introduce a child you know to William Blake's poem "The Tyger"? Would you like to understand the words and feel their passion in a new way? The design of "The Tyger," illustrated by Neil Waldman in acrylics on canvas, will accomplish this for you -- from the orange endpapers (front and ** back) to the tiger done in gray and black, which opens to a four-page-long orange and black tiger, deep in the forest of many-layered underbrush under shooting stars.
FEATURES
By CLARINDA HARRISS RAYMOND | August 18, 1991
SATURDAY, AUG. 3"O rose, thou'rt sick!"Seldom has a line by William Blake been hissed with such specific viciousness."You OK?" my neighbor Joe asks me. "I've been watching you for a while now. Just standing there glaring into that rosebush." He is kind enough not to add "and talking to yourself."Actually, what I've been glaring at for the past five or 10 minutes is one single pink rose. One single pink and black rose."All I can say is, I wouldn't want to be whatever it is you're looking at!"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Dr. William Dewey Blake, a retired University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who was chairman of the department of physiology, died of cancer Sunday at his Bath, Maine, home. The former Bolton Hill resident was 94. Born in Summit, N.J., and raised in New Haven, Conn., he was the son of Dr. Francis Blake, Yale University's department of medicine chairman who was also an internist. His mother, Dorothy Blake, was a homemaker. After graduating from the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, he earned a degree at Dartmouth College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
After a six-day trial, a federal jury awarded $225,000 on Wednesday to a Baltimore County police detective who suffered a seizure on the job in 1996. William Blake, 40, who remains in the department, contended in his suit against the county's government that it had violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by ordering him to submit to neurological and fitness-for-duty tests 10 years after he had the seizure. Blake, a member of the department since 1987, was pronounced ready to work three weeks after becoming ill, returned to his duties and suffered no further epileptic episodes.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2010
A federal jury will begin deliberations today in a case brought by a Baltimore County police detective who suffered a seizure in 1996 and said his bosses tried to remove him from active duty after he testified on behalf of another officer with a similar problem. William Blake, a member of the department since 1987 who now works in its undercover criminal intelligence unit, has accused the department of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by ordering neurological and fitness-for-duty tests a decade after his on-the-job epileptic seizure.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | March 23, 1995
"Every blade of grass has over it an angel saying 'grow,' " the Talmud tells us.Nancy Willard has a penchant for angels and for God and for love. She's a highly acclaimed poet who writes about happy things -- her son, her marriage, her garden, the world around her. She chose the lines from the Talmud as an epigraph to her book "An Alphabet of Angels," and they suggest the scope of her work.She will read some of her poems at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Catonsville Community College to lead off the ninth annual Creative Writing Forum, sponsored by Baltimore County public schools and community colleges.
NEWS
By JUDITH B. ROSEFELD Title: "The Scorpio Illusion" Author: Robert Ludlum Publisher: Bantam Length, price: 534 pages, $23.95 and JUDITH B. ROSEFELD Title: "The Scorpio Illusion" Author: Robert Ludlum Publisher: Bantam Length, price: 534 pages, $23.95,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1993
Title: "The Tyger"All for Love"Author: William Blake; illustrated by Neil WaldmanPublisher: Harcourt, Brace and Co.Length, price: 32 pages; $15.95. All ages Would you like to introduce a child you know to William Blake's poem "The Tyger"? Would you like to understand the words and feel their passion in a new way? The design of "The Tyger," illustrated by Neil Waldman in acrylics on canvas, will accomplish this for you -- from the orange endpapers (front and ** back) to the tiger done in gray and black, which opens to a four-page-long orange and black tiger, deep in the forest of many-layered underbrush under shooting stars.
FEATURES
By CLARINDA HARRISS RAYMOND | August 18, 1991
SATURDAY, AUG. 3"O rose, thou'rt sick!"Seldom has a line by William Blake been hissed with such specific viciousness."You OK?" my neighbor Joe asks me. "I've been watching you for a while now. Just standing there glaring into that rosebush." He is kind enough not to add "and talking to yourself."Actually, what I've been glaring at for the past five or 10 minutes is one single pink rose. One single pink and black rose."All I can say is, I wouldn't want to be whatever it is you're looking at!"
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | November 22, 1990
"GRATITUDE IS the least of the virtues; the lack of it, the worst of the vices.'' The proverb is perfect Thanksgiving Day material. I take it to mean this: We are all recipients of so many favors, so many graces, that being grateful should be as natural as breathing. Not being grateful is a kind of spiritual self-asphyxiation.What many of us are especially thankful for are those special moments of love, of joy, of blissful insight which can change us forever. Though the consequences are often enduring, the experiences themselves are typically brief.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
On September 5, 2004, SUSAN MURRAY BLAKE (nee Rowell). Born June 23, 1944. Died in Keizer, OR. Survived by her husband William Blake, sons, Jordan, Christian and Joel, sisters, Nancy Allen and Leslie Decker and brothers Daniel and Mark Rowell. Memorial service will be held in Keizer, OR, at a later date. Contact 410-435-3817 for details.
NEWS
January 23, 2005
On January 19, 2005, DOROTHYGREGORIUS BLAKE, wife of the late William E. Blake Jr. Daughter of the late Lillian Wood and William Frederick Gregorius, loving mother of William E. Blake III, grandmother of Michele Stewart, Karen and Gregory Blake; great-grandmother of Andrew, David, Hannah, and Joshua Stewart, Sophia Semeniuk, Connor and Katie Blake. Family will receive friends at the WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14), on Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., where services will be held on Monday at 11 A.M. Interment in Loudon Park Cemetery.
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