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William Banks

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NEWS
April 24, 2003
On April 19, 2003, LINDA L., wife of William Banks Jr. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral services at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
William Bradford Banks, a retired packaging executive and accomplished watercolorist, died in his sleep Wednesday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Ruxton resident was 98. He was born in Baltimore and reared in the 1700 block of Park Ave. He was a 1925 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1929. Mr. Banks began his 40-year career with Lord Baltimore Press in 1929. During the 1950s, he developed the Fidel-I-Tone Color Process, which resulted in Lord Baltimore Press being regarded as one of the premier companies in the folding paper box industry, family members said.
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NEWS
August 2, 2002
Harassment pushed Banks into shooting The Sun's article "Man who shot youths says he just asked them to move"(July 30) reported that a 60-year-old man shot three youths who refused to leave his front porch. Frustration and anger over the troubled streets of Baltimore, apparently fueled by a heated exchange of words, pushed William Banks to do what he did. Legally, Mr. Banks was wrong. On the other hand, he did deliver street justice. As the article pointed out, these youths were not choirboys.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
On April 19, 2003, LINDA L., wife of William Banks Jr. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends on Saturday at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral services at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
William Banks, the East Baltimore man accused of shooting three youths after a group of boys refused to move from his stoop, pleaded not guilty yesterday to attempted first-degree murder and plans to argue self-defense at his trial, his attorney said. Circuit Judge Evelyn O. Cannon set a trial date of Feb. 4 for Banks, 60, who also faces several handgun charges. If convicted, Banks could be sentenced to life in prison. Assistant State's Attorney William Cecil is prosecuting him. Before his arraignment, Banks sat quietly.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 31, 2002
I HAVE A friend who lived in Oakenshawe, between Guilford and Charles Village, on the north side of Baltimore. He's an artsy guy, hip and urbane, a lover of city life. "I am tired," he announced one day, about a decade ago. "I am sick and tired of getting my bikes stolen." It wasn't exactly a story of bullets and body bags, but, among the middle class in this town, a common moan. My friend was exasperated. The high property taxes and car insurance rates, the lack of leadership in city government at the time, the trash along the streets he frequented -- and all of that compounded by more than his share of break-ins.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
In one of the city's recent cases of vigilantism, a 60- year-old man who shot and wounded three youths pleaded guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to a crime prosecutors say was motivated by the man's growing rage with problems on his block. William Banks will spend up to 10 years in prison for shooting the youths with a .38-caliber revolver he had stolen from his employer the night before the confrontation July 28. Banks, who told detectives that he had had several run-ins with the youths and had phoned police dozens of times to report neighborhood problems, emptied his five-shot revolver about 1 p.m., hitting the victims several times.
NEWS
July 18, 1994
Several words were omitted from a letter to the editor by William Banks published Monday.The sentence should have read, "The idea that by giving honest people $107.11 worth of merchandise for antiques or firearms which have been sitting in closets for 30 years, 7-Eleven will reduce crime, is hilarious."The Sun regrets the errors.Buying GunsI was very amused, yet troubled, by your July 12 article concerning the 7-Eleven gun buy-back program.I found it quite amusing that the picture in your newspaper showed two Baltimore City policewomen looking at a replica of an 18th century muzzle-loading pistol which had been turned in for $107.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
William Bradford Banks, a retired packaging executive and accomplished watercolorist, died in his sleep Wednesday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Ruxton resident was 98. He was born in Baltimore and reared in the 1700 block of Park Ave. He was a 1925 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1929. Mr. Banks began his 40-year career with Lord Baltimore Press in 1929. During the 1950s, he developed the Fidel-I-Tone Color Process, which resulted in Lord Baltimore Press being regarded as one of the premier companies in the folding paper box industry, family members said.
NEWS
March 18, 2006
On March 16, 2006, SARAH PARKER KOPPELMAN BANKS, a resident of Broadmead, Cockeysville, MD; beloved wife of William Bradford Banks and devoted mother of Cortlandt Banks Fengler of San Mateo, CA and Rebecca Banks Mowbray of Ruxton, MD; loving grandmother of Richard Sutton of Seal Beach CA., Wiliam Sutton of Hamburg, Germany, Jennifer Barta of Baltimore, MD and J. Bradford Mowbray of Arlington, VA; dearest great-grandmother of Parker, Grace, Evan and Steven....
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
In one of the city's recent cases of vigilantism, a 60- year-old man who shot and wounded three youths pleaded guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to a crime prosecutors say was motivated by the man's growing rage with problems on his block. William Banks will spend up to 10 years in prison for shooting the youths with a .38-caliber revolver he had stolen from his employer the night before the confrontation July 28. Banks, who told detectives that he had had several run-ins with the youths and had phoned police dozens of times to report neighborhood problems, emptied his five-shot revolver about 1 p.m., hitting the victims several times.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
William Banks, the East Baltimore man accused of shooting three youths after a group of boys refused to move from his stoop, pleaded not guilty yesterday to attempted first-degree murder and plans to argue self-defense at his trial, his attorney said. Circuit Judge Evelyn O. Cannon set a trial date of Feb. 4 for Banks, 60, who also faces several handgun charges. If convicted, Banks could be sentenced to life in prison. Assistant State's Attorney William Cecil is prosecuting him. Before his arraignment, Banks sat quietly.
NEWS
August 2, 2002
Harassment pushed Banks into shooting The Sun's article "Man who shot youths says he just asked them to move"(July 30) reported that a 60-year-old man shot three youths who refused to leave his front porch. Frustration and anger over the troubled streets of Baltimore, apparently fueled by a heated exchange of words, pushed William Banks to do what he did. Legally, Mr. Banks was wrong. On the other hand, he did deliver street justice. As the article pointed out, these youths were not choirboys.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 31, 2002
I HAVE A friend who lived in Oakenshawe, between Guilford and Charles Village, on the north side of Baltimore. He's an artsy guy, hip and urbane, a lover of city life. "I am tired," he announced one day, about a decade ago. "I am sick and tired of getting my bikes stolen." It wasn't exactly a story of bullets and body bags, but, among the middle class in this town, a common moan. My friend was exasperated. The high property taxes and car insurance rates, the lack of leadership in city government at the time, the trash along the streets he frequented -- and all of that compounded by more than his share of break-ins.
NEWS
July 18, 1994
Several words were omitted from a letter to the editor by William Banks published Monday.The sentence should have read, "The idea that by giving honest people $107.11 worth of merchandise for antiques or firearms which have been sitting in closets for 30 years, 7-Eleven will reduce crime, is hilarious."The Sun regrets the errors.Buying GunsI was very amused, yet troubled, by your July 12 article concerning the 7-Eleven gun buy-back program.I found it quite amusing that the picture in your newspaper showed two Baltimore City policewomen looking at a replica of an 18th century muzzle-loading pistol which had been turned in for $107.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
A Jan. 28 trial date has been scheduled for Edward Leon Day, the West Baltimore man who police say fatally wounded a teen-ager in July. Day, 55, of the 2300 block of Harlem Ave. pleaded not guilty yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to second-degree murder, carrying a concealed, deadly weapon and carrying a weapon openly with intent to injure. He was arraigned before Judge Ellen Heller. Day is charged in the fatal shooting July 11 of David Stewart, 15, of the 2700 block of W. Lafayette Ave. Police say Stewart was trying to steal a bicycle from Day's yard.
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