Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWillemin
IN THE NEWS

Willemin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 1994
Louis Willemin elected bar group presidentLouis P. Willemin, Howard County deputy district public defender, has been elected president of the Howard County Bar Association for the 1994-1995 term.Mr. Willemin received his law degree in 1978 from the University of Maryland School of Law, where he was associate editor of Maryland Law Review. Susan Wade has joined ERIS Enterprises, a management consulting and training firm in Columbia, as an associate in its training materials desktop publishing staff.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
The presence of a resident alien on the jury that convicted a 33-year-old Columbia man of murder last month is not grounds for setting aside the verdict and ordering a new trial, a Howard County Circuit judge ruled yesterday. Although U.S. citizenship is a requirement of jury service under Maryland law, lawyers for Marcus D. Owens never challenged the juror's qualifications to serve on the panel during the selection process and therefore gave up the right to object later, Judge Diane O. Leasure wrote in a 11-page opinion released yesterday.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 15, 1995
An article in Wednesday's edition of The Sun for Howard County incorrectly identified the positions of Circuit Court judicial nominees Louis B. Willemin and Diane O. Leasure. Ms. Leasure is past president of the Prince George's County Bar Association. Mr. Willemin is a Howard County public defender.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2001
Antonio Donnell Oesby's DNA profile matched a sample on a vaginal swab taken from a Columbia rape victim a few hours after she was attacked in her sport utility vehicle while her young son slept in the back seat, a DNA analyst testified yesterday. That evidence, on the third and final day of testimony in Oesby's trial on rape and carjacking charges, was the first offered by prosecutors as a potential link between the 25-year-old convicted rapist and the Oct. 1, 1999, crimes - in a case that is expected to hinge on the Howard County jury's view of the reliability of genetic testing.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
A former Marine sergeant received a suspended sentence i Howard Circuit Court yesterday for performing a sexual act with a 17-year-old Columbia girl.James Alexander Page Jr., 27, of Greenbelt, was convicted of performing a perverted sexual practice after having sex with the girl in a car at a parking lot on Aug. 19."If I had known it was a crime, I would never have done it," Page told Judge James Dudley during his sentencing hearing.Judge Dudley sentenced Page to one year in prison, but suspended the entire term.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A Baltimore man was convicted Monday night in an armed robbery of $4,000 from his former employer, a Jessup moving company.Clarence E. Cherry, 27, went to his former employer, Magic Movers, with another man about 8 p.m. July 24 and demanded money.He was wearing a homemade mask, but the disguise didn't work. At one point, one boss said, "What in the hell are you doing, Clarence?"Jurors in Howard County Circuit Court took about five hours to reach a verdict. During closing arguments, Assistant State's Attorney Debra Saltz urged jurors to convict Cherry because the two victims, his former bosses, recognized him.Public defender Louis P. Willemin argued that witnesses couldn't positively identify Cherry and might have been mistaken.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | August 25, 1991
Before Judge James B. Dudley sentenced him to life without parole last week for the murders of his girlfriend and her lover, Walter Thomas Harding tried to explain what drove him to the ultimate act of violence."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
A Howard County public defender pursued several unusual legal strategies in Howard Circuit Court yesterday in the case of a man accused of robbing an Ellicott City bank last winter.Deputy Public Defender Louis Willemin wanted a courtroom line-up, requested a judge to remove himself from the case and asked for the charges against 30-year-old Henry Darnell Johnson Jr. of Baltimore to be dismissed. And all that courtroom action occurred before the trial even started.Mr. Willemin wanted the courtroom lineup to require witnesses to identify the robber.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A 52-year-old accountant, described by prosecutors as "reckless and grossly negligent," was convicted yesterday in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for giving Geneva Marie Hodge a deadly dose of chloroform to treat a toothache on Sept. 6, 1993 -- despite defense claims that her death was an accident.Bowers, who lived in Ellicott City at the time of the incident but has since moved to Baltimore, could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | October 9, 1993
A financial consultant has been indicted on charges of manslaughter and reckless endangerment in connection with the death of a 20-year-old woman who authorities say died from inhaling chloroform in his Ellicott City home.A Howard County grand jury indicted Melvin Robert Bowers Thursday in the Sept. 6 death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. Mr. Bowers, 50, also is charged with inhaling harmful substances.Deputy Public Defender Louis Willemin, who is representing Mr. Bowers, said that he did not expect the indictment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
An Anne Arundel jail inmate pleaded no contest yesterday to threatening the judge who sent him there - a case stemming from a purported threat made during a jailhouse Bible study and reported by the pastor leading it, according to prosecutors. Hiram J. Sewell, 38, entered the plea in county Circuit Court as part of an arrangement that gives him no additional jail time or probation. It sidestepped a ticklish situation that entailed bringing a public defender and judge from out of the jurisdiction for a trial in which two sitting judges were likely to be called as witnesses.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
As she sat in a Howard County courtroom late Monday listening to a jury convict the man accused of killing her baby daughter, Sherri Rippeon took note of the time. It was 11:30 p.m., and the jury had just returned guilty verdicts against William P. English for second-degree murder, manslaughter and second-degree assault. Rippeon's 8-month-old daughter, Victoria Rose Dobbin, had died at 11:30 p.m. - 15 months earlier. "I thought it was just a sign from God," she said yesterday. A jury took 11 hours Monday to find English, 23, guilty of causing Victoria's death, rejecting a defense argument that English had too little time to commit the crime.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
A judge ruled yesterday that prosecutors can use two confessions made by a 51-year-old Columbia man that he killed his wife and wounded her daughter outside the Howard County Circuit Courthouse last March. Circuit Judge Diane O. Leasure also ruled that evidence seized from Tuse S. Liu's rental car at the scene and from his home can be used against him at his trial on murder charges next month. Liu is accused of shooting his wife and stepdaughter after a divorce proceeding in the same courthouse where he testified Tuesday during motions hearings.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A Baltimore man was convicted Monday night in an armed robbery of $4,000 from his former employer, a Jessup moving company.Clarence E. Cherry, 27, went to his former employer, Magic Movers, with another man about 8 p.m. July 24 and demanded money.He was wearing a homemade mask, but the disguise didn't work. At one point, one boss said, "What in the hell are you doing, Clarence?"Jurors in Howard County Circuit Court took about five hours to reach a verdict. During closing arguments, Assistant State's Attorney Debra Saltz urged jurors to convict Cherry because the two victims, his former bosses, recognized him.Public defender Louis P. Willemin argued that witnesses couldn't positively identify Cherry and might have been mistaken.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A 52-year-old accountant, described by prosecutors as "reckless and grossly negligent," was convicted yesterday in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for giving Geneva Marie Hodge a deadly dose of chloroform to treat a toothache on Sept. 6, 1993 -- despite defense claims that her death was an accident.Bowers, who lived in Ellicott City at the time of the incident but has since moved to Baltimore, could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
October 15, 1995
An article in Wednesday's edition of The Sun for Howard County incorrectly identified the positions of Circuit Court judicial nominees Louis B. Willemin and Diane O. Leasure. Ms. Leasure is past president of the Prince George's County Bar Association. Mr. Willemin is a Howard County public defender.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
A man serving five life sentences for rapes in Anne Arundel County stands trial this week in the first of two rape cases he faces in Howard Circuit Court.Testimony is expected to open tomorrow in the case of Michael Devon Armstead, a 33-year-old Brooklyn Park resident who is charged with first-degree rape and 12 other counts in a January 1991 attack of an Ellicott City woman.Armstead is accused of breaking into an Ellicott City house and raping its owner on Jan. 29, 1991.Jury selection for the trial is continuing today despite efforts by Louis Willemin, a public defender representing Armstead, to get proceedings delayed because his client did not have a suit, tie and dress shoes to wear.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
A Circuit Court judge ruled Friday that portions of a taped interview police conducted with an Ellicott City accountant accused of manslaughter in the death of his 20-year-old girlfriend should be stricken before the case goes to trial later this month.Judge James B. Dudley denied most of what Deputy Public Defender Louis P. Willemin requested, however.Mr. Willemin wanted Judge Dudley to suppress portions of a statement Melvin Robert Bowers, 50, gave to police after the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore on Sept.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
A Howard County public defender pursued several unusual legal strategies in Howard Circuit Court yesterday in the case of a man accused of robbing an Ellicott City bank last winter.Deputy Public Defender Louis Willemin wanted a courtroom line-up, requested a judge to remove himself from the case and asked for the charges against 30-year-old Henry Darnell Johnson Jr. of Baltimore to be dismissed. And all that courtroom action occurred before the trial even started.Mr. Willemin wanted the courtroom lineup to require witnesses to identify the robber.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
A man accused of bank robbery failed to get criminal charges dismissed during a Howard Circuit Court pretrial hearing yesterday that ended with his trial being set for March 1.Henry Darnell Johnson Jr. and his attorney undertook several legal maneuvers in challenging charges that the 30-year-old Baltimore man robbed an Ellicott City bank in January.But all of the requests -- including one for a courtroom lineup that would have required robbery witnesses to identify Mr. Johnson as the suspect -- were denied by Judge Raymond Kane Jr.Mr.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.