Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWillem Dafoe
IN THE NEWS

Willem Dafoe

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 2001
Max Schreck endures as one of cinema's most bizarre-looking icons, one Willem Dafoe acknowledges he was a natural to play. "Steven Katz says he wrote it for me," Dafoe says, referring to the role of Schreck in director E. Elias Merhige's "Shadow of the Vampire." The new film imagines that Schreck, star of F.W. Murnau's surrealistic 1922 "Dracula" clone, "Nosferatu," really was a vampire, and that all the work that went into making him look so archetypically demonic was really no work at all. Now, some actors might not take such a connection to Schreck as a compliment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 29, 2005
Lots of things blow up real good in XXX: State of the Union. As to whether anything else happens, I'll let you know after my eardrums stop bleeding. Ahhh, my concussion seems to be clearing. I remember a buffed-up Ice Cube scowling a lot, women in cleavage-enhancing outfits providing eye candy, the U.S. Capitol with a gaping hole in its side, Samuel L. Jackson with a tire-grid prosthetic on the side of his face and a boat leaping onto a bridge. Like few movies in recent memory (at least few since the original XXX)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Bob Crane - handsome with a knowing smirk and an easy manner - seemed like a wholesome, low-key, instantly likeable actor, perfect for family viewing on the living-room TV. In truth, he was nothing of the sort. He was a womanizing philanderer with an insatiable libido, whose sexual practices could charitably be described as deviant, and who compounded the perversity by amassing a huge collection of homemade pornography, starring himself, his friends and any woman he could persuade to disrobe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Bob Crane - handsome with a knowing smirk and an easy manner - seemed like a wholesome, low-key, instantly likeable actor, perfect for family viewing on the living-room TV. In truth, he was nothing of the sort. He was a womanizing philanderer with an insatiable libido, whose sexual practices could charitably be described as deviant, and who compounded the perversity by amassing a huge collection of homemade pornography, starring himself, his friends and any woman he could persuade to disrobe.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
''Flight of the Intruder'' takes about an hour to get off the ground, and once it does, is rather exciting. That first hour, though, is a trial.The film was directed by John Milius (''Red Dawn''), many of whose films have been characterized by their gung-ho exuberance, their determination to go over the top and take the audience with them, flags flying, guns firing.Milius wears his convictions on his movie sleeves, and the new one is no exception. It could have been made during World War II. It certainly plays that way. The principal characters are Navy men, a squadron leader, a pilot, a bombardier and a flight commander.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
speed (sped) n. Swiftness of action. The state of being in rapid motion.Speed 2 (sped too) movie. Slow. Lumbering. Interminable. Cannot end soon enough.Sometimes you've said all you have to say, which certainly is true of the makers of the taut, entertaining 1994 megahit "Speed." Their sequel, "Speed 2: Cruise Control," lacks the key ingredients of the original: an involving plot, wit and sustained suspense. Maybe they were in too big a hurry.The sequel reunites director Jan De Bont with Sandra Bullock, who, as terminally spunky Annie Porter in the original, became the most famous bus driver since Ralph Kramden.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 29, 2005
Lots of things blow up real good in XXX: State of the Union. As to whether anything else happens, I'll let you know after my eardrums stop bleeding. Ahhh, my concussion seems to be clearing. I remember a buffed-up Ice Cube scowling a lot, women in cleavage-enhancing outfits providing eye candy, the U.S. Capitol with a gaping hole in its side, Samuel L. Jackson with a tire-grid prosthetic on the side of his face and a boat leaping onto a bridge. Like few movies in recent memory (at least few since the original XXX)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 15, 1993
She's a cruel mistress. Selfish and utterly without conscience, she does what she wants, and no amount of money or love can dissuade her from her hungers. Even if she loves you, it's no good unless she loves you all the way. Men die for her approval,and so do women, but whether or not she gives it is entirely up to her.Of course I speak not, ladies and gentleman, of the phenomenon or the person known as Madonna. No indeed, I speak rather of the cruel and capricious mistress known as the motion picture camera, and no amount of publicity or number of gold records or magazine covers can buy her off. She sees what she sees, and it's always the truth.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2002
HOLLYWOOD -- Haley Joel Osment has put together a pretty impressive string of recent films. He got an Oscar nomination for his role in the blockbuster The Sixth Sense; co-starred opposite Jude Law in Steven Spielberg's A.I.: Artificial Intelligence; and appeared with Kevin Spacey in the drama Pay It Forward. But the movie the young actor really put his heart into is a movie that you may never see. Called Edges of the Lord, it features Osment as a blond, blue-eyed Jewish boy who is given a chance to survive by passing as a Gentile during the Nazi invasion of Poland.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 17, 1996
The Brits haven't yet figured out that movie people are supposed to be cool. For God's sake, even a guy like Jon Lovitz knows that and is trying to get with it these days! But to a man, they appear for interviews as dowdy, blimpy, regular guys, well-packed in avoirdupois and well-swaddled in bad clothes.Take Anthony Minghella, for example. Minghella, an award-winning English playwright, hit the big time, sort of, a few years back with "Truly Madly Deeply," which was called an intelligent "Ghost," an act of romantic mesmerization with Alan Rickman and Juliet Stevenson.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2002
HOLLYWOOD -- Haley Joel Osment has put together a pretty impressive string of recent films. He got an Oscar nomination for his role in the blockbuster The Sixth Sense; co-starred opposite Jude Law in Steven Spielberg's A.I.: Artificial Intelligence; and appeared with Kevin Spacey in the drama Pay It Forward. But the movie the young actor really put his heart into is a movie that you may never see. Called Edges of the Lord, it features Osment as a blond, blue-eyed Jewish boy who is given a chance to survive by passing as a Gentile during the Nazi invasion of Poland.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 2001
Max Schreck endures as one of cinema's most bizarre-looking icons, one Willem Dafoe acknowledges he was a natural to play. "Steven Katz says he wrote it for me," Dafoe says, referring to the role of Schreck in director E. Elias Merhige's "Shadow of the Vampire." The new film imagines that Schreck, star of F.W. Murnau's surrealistic 1922 "Dracula" clone, "Nosferatu," really was a vampire, and that all the work that went into making him look so archetypically demonic was really no work at all. Now, some actors might not take such a connection to Schreck as a compliment.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
speed (sped) n. Swiftness of action. The state of being in rapid motion.Speed 2 (sped too) movie. Slow. Lumbering. Interminable. Cannot end soon enough.Sometimes you've said all you have to say, which certainly is true of the makers of the taut, entertaining 1994 megahit "Speed." Their sequel, "Speed 2: Cruise Control," lacks the key ingredients of the original: an involving plot, wit and sustained suspense. Maybe they were in too big a hurry.The sequel reunites director Jan De Bont with Sandra Bullock, who, as terminally spunky Annie Porter in the original, became the most famous bus driver since Ralph Kramden.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 17, 1996
The Brits haven't yet figured out that movie people are supposed to be cool. For God's sake, even a guy like Jon Lovitz knows that and is trying to get with it these days! But to a man, they appear for interviews as dowdy, blimpy, regular guys, well-packed in avoirdupois and well-swaddled in bad clothes.Take Anthony Minghella, for example. Minghella, an award-winning English playwright, hit the big time, sort of, a few years back with "Truly Madly Deeply," which was called an intelligent "Ghost," an act of romantic mesmerization with Alan Rickman and Juliet Stevenson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 15, 1993
She's a cruel mistress. Selfish and utterly without conscience, she does what she wants, and no amount of money or love can dissuade her from her hungers. Even if she loves you, it's no good unless she loves you all the way. Men die for her approval,and so do women, but whether or not she gives it is entirely up to her.Of course I speak not, ladies and gentleman, of the phenomenon or the person known as Madonna. No indeed, I speak rather of the cruel and capricious mistress known as the motion picture camera, and no amount of publicity or number of gold records or magazine covers can buy her off. She sees what she sees, and it's always the truth.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
''Flight of the Intruder'' takes about an hour to get off the ground, and once it does, is rather exciting. That first hour, though, is a trial.The film was directed by John Milius (''Red Dawn''), many of whose films have been characterized by their gung-ho exuberance, their determination to go over the top and take the audience with them, flags flying, guns firing.Milius wears his convictions on his movie sleeves, and the new one is no exception. It could have been made during World War II. It certainly plays that way. The principal characters are Navy men, a squadron leader, a pilot, a bombardier and a flight commander.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 17, 1991
* ''Eve of Destruction'' A robot, designed to look exactly like her creator, turns bad. Gregory Hines and Renee Sutendijk star.* ''Flight of the Intruder'' A Navy pilot and a bombardier go against orders and bomb Hanoi. Willem Dafoe, Danny Glover and Brad Johnson star.* ''Green Card'' A comedy starring Gerard Depardieu as a Frenchman who marries an American woman (Andie MacDowell) to gain possession of a green card, one that will allow him to work in this country.* ''Hamlet'' Mel Gibson, who was introduced to American audiences as Max Max, plays the melancholy Dane in Franco Zeffirelli's version of the Shakespearean tragedy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | April 23, 1992
"The Player" is an acerbic, satiric look at Hollywood, as put together by Hollywood exile Robert Altman. It follows an ambitious young producer as he tries to navigate his way through some career obstacles, including murder. Rated R."White Sands" features Willem Dafoe as a deputy sheriff in New Mexico who goes undercover to find a murderer. Mickey Rourke plays his nemesis, a heavy-lidded CIA lizard. Rated R."Toto le Heros" is a wondrous Belgian film in which a bitter old man sets out to murder a rival and ends up recovering his own life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.