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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association say they now have enough votes to approve a labor contract addendum with Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the port of Baltimore's largest shipping line. Local 1429 of the ILA voted 67-4 yesterday to accept work rules changes that were a cornerstone of Wallenius Wilhelmsen's plans to consolidate much of its East Coast operations in Baltimore. Despite the low turnout among the union's roughly 130 members, the count gives proponents of the contract addendum the votes needed to overrule the much larger cargo handlers' union, which voted 235-189 last week against the agreement.
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NEWS
October 6, 2004
On October 3, 2004 ROBERT D. GEALY, beloved husband of Lillian Gealy; loving father of Leah Wilhelmsen and her husband, Dr. Hans Wilhelmsen, Robert D. Gealy, Jr., Glenn M. Gealy and his wife Nancy, and Gregg S. Gealy and his wife Cyndi; dear grandfather of Ray and Paul Faust and Shawn, Michael, Erin, Kristen and Taylar Gealy. Friends may call at CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Thursday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. The Patapsco Masonic Lodge #183 will hold a service at 7:30 P.M. Funeral service Friday, 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
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BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2002
In a decision that could steer more cargo to the port of Baltimore, the European Union has given Scandinavian shipping line Wallenius Wilhelmsen regulatory approval to purchase South Korea's biggest shipping company in a deal worth $1.5 billion. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, one of the port's biggest customers, is close to finalizing a deal to purchase Hyundai Merchant Marine, which is struggling under the burden of $5 billion in debt. The deal, which still must win approval from Hyundai's creditors, would double the company's fleet of 60 ships and make Wallenius Wilhelmsen the world's largest ocean transporter of cars and heavy machinery.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2002
In a decision that could steer more cargo to the port of Baltimore, the European Union has given Scandinavian shipping line Wallenius Wilhelmsen regulatory approval to purchase South Korea's biggest shipping company in a deal worth $1.5 billion. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, one of the port's biggest customers, is close to finalizing a deal to purchase Hyundai Merchant Marine, which is struggling under the burden of $5 billion in debt. The deal, which still must win approval from Hyundai's creditors, would double the company's fleet of 60 ships and make Wallenius Wilhelmsen the world's largest ocean transporter of cars and heavy machinery.
NEWS
October 6, 2004
On October 3, 2004 ROBERT D. GEALY, beloved husband of Lillian Gealy; loving father of Leah Wilhelmsen and her husband, Dr. Hans Wilhelmsen, Robert D. Gealy, Jr., Glenn M. Gealy and his wife Nancy, and Gregg S. Gealy and his wife Cyndi; dear grandfather of Ray and Paul Faust and Shawn, Michael, Erin, Kristen and Taylar Gealy. Friends may call at CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Thursday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. The Patapsco Masonic Lodge #183 will hold a service at 7:30 P.M. Funeral service Friday, 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
CHANGE IS difficult, especially when it affects the way you do your job. That helps explain why members of International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 twice rejected new work rules that could mean a big increase in shipping at the port of Baltimore. Why make further concessions, many of them asked. Enough is enough. But not when those work changes could lead to a dramatic jump in the number of ships docking at Baltimore. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the world's largest maritime carrier of cars, farm equipment and other roll-on/roll-off cargo, wants to make Baltimore its regional hub. The state wants to spend tens of millions of dollars on new facilities at a 150-acre port site.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
IF THE port of Baltimore loses the chance to become a hub for the world's largest "roll-on/ roll-off" shipping line, you can thank rank and file members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Four other ILA locals here approved work-rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which carries more autos, farm equipment and heavy machinery than any of its competitors. But not Local 333, which resoundingly rebuffed the deal. That jeopardizes a 10-year contract with WWL that was expected to lead to a tripling of the line's Baltimore business.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
The port of Baltimore landed what state officials are calling the biggest deal in its 295-year history yesterday as the Board of Public Works approved a contract with a Scandinavian shipping company that is expected to bring at least 3,000 vessel calls over the next 20 years. The port handles more than 500,000 tons of roll-on, roll-off cargo a year. The contract could more than double that amount. The contract with Wallenius Wilhelmsen Atlantic LLC, which will be signed today at a ceremony aboard a company ship at Dundalk Marine Terminal, solidifies Baltimore's position as a major East Coast port for cars, trucks, tractors and other cargo that can be rolled on or off a ship.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | March 15, 1996
MARYLAND GRAD, successful business man James G. Robinson, founder, chairman and CEO of Morgan Creek Productions, has been named producer of the year by NATO/ShoWest. According to his spokeswoman, Linda Goldenberg, this is a special honor because the delegates are from dozens of countries and are part of the largest convention in the world devoted exclusively to the motion picture industry. (Linda, also a Baltimorean, says we'll see her at the O's home opener, which she never misses.) Robinson joins the company of other great producers like James L. Brooks, David Brown and Richard Zanuck, James Cameron, Francis Ford Coppola, Warren Beatty and Steven Spielberg.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The port of Baltimore's largest shipping line still holds out faint hope for an agreement with local Longshoremen that will pave the way for a new cargo hub in the city. But Wallenius Wilhelmsen said yesterday that it has no plans to present another proposal to the union, which rejected the company's request for work rules changes in a 235-189 vote Tuesday. Maryland port officials are not giving up, saying they are discussing the possibility of another vote with union leadership. The union has rejected the contract addendum twice already, though the most recent vote failed by a slimmer margin.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
Soon after tying up at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, the Tampere lowered its comma-shaped stern ramp, revealing three cavernous cargo decks laid out like a floating parking garage. The ship shuddered as an empty flat-bed truck ascended the ramp, veered left and accelerated toward the lowest of the ship's three decks, where it was met by the heavy odor of bulk rubber from Singapore. Mindful of the need for speed, a team of Baltimore longshoremen immediately went to work loading the wobbly cargo aboard the trailer, taking care not to tear sheets of plastic wrapped tightly around the pallets to protect the rubber from scrapes.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
The port of Baltimore landed what state officials are calling the biggest deal in its 295-year history yesterday as the Board of Public Works approved a contract with a Scandinavian shipping company that is expected to bring at least 3,000 vessel calls over the next 20 years. The port handles more than 500,000 tons of roll-on, roll-off cargo a year. The contract could more than double that amount. The contract with Wallenius Wilhelmsen Atlantic LLC, which will be signed today at a ceremony aboard a company ship at Dundalk Marine Terminal, solidifies Baltimore's position as a major East Coast port for cars, trucks, tractors and other cargo that can be rolled on or off a ship.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
If there was one moment last year that characterized the gradual transformation of Baltimore's port, it probably came in late June. That's when local longshoremen agreed to amended work rules that shipping line Wallenius Wilhelmsen demanded as part of its offer to develop a new load center at the Dundalk Marine Terminal. With flexible labor agreements in place, the Scandinavian shipping line was prepared to negotiate a 20-year lease, committing it to bringing thousands of additional cars, tractors and other cargo that can be rolled on and off ships.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
State transportation officials are close to signing a 20-year, multimillion-dollar deal with a major shipping line that will accelerate the port of Baltimore's transformation into an East Coast powerhouse for automobiles, farm tractors and other specialized cargo that can be rolled on and off ships. If realized, the deal will bring new jobs and revenue to the port, while also lending added credibility to the state's 1996 strategic plan to attract a combination of automobiles, forest products and other niche cargo to Baltimore in hopes of reversing the port's decade-long decline.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
CHANGE IS difficult, especially when it affects the way you do your job. That helps explain why members of International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 twice rejected new work rules that could mean a big increase in shipping at the port of Baltimore. Why make further concessions, many of them asked. Enough is enough. But not when those work changes could lead to a dramatic jump in the number of ships docking at Baltimore. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the world's largest maritime carrier of cars, farm equipment and other roll-on/roll-off cargo, wants to make Baltimore its regional hub. The state wants to spend tens of millions of dollars on new facilities at a 150-acre port site.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association say they now have enough votes to approve a labor contract addendum with Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the port of Baltimore's largest shipping line. Local 1429 of the ILA voted 67-4 yesterday to accept work rules changes that were a cornerstone of Wallenius Wilhelmsen's plans to consolidate much of its East Coast operations in Baltimore. Despite the low turnout among the union's roughly 130 members, the count gives proponents of the contract addendum the votes needed to overrule the much larger cargo handlers' union, which voted 235-189 last week against the agreement.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
State transportation officials are close to signing a 20-year, multimillion-dollar deal with a major shipping line that will accelerate the port of Baltimore's transformation into an East Coast powerhouse for automobiles, farm tractors and other specialized cargo that can be rolled on and off ships. If realized, the deal will bring new jobs and revenue to the port, while also lending added credibility to the state's 1996 strategic plan to attract a combination of automobiles, forest products and other niche cargo to Baltimore in hopes of reversing the port's decade-long decline.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2001
Soon after tying up at the Dundalk Marine Terminal, the Tampere lowered its comma-shaped stern ramp, revealing three cavernous cargo decks laid out like a floating parking garage. The ship shuddered as an empty flat-bed truck ascended the ramp, veered left and accelerated toward the lowest of the ship's three decks, where it was met by the heavy odor of bulk rubber from Singapore. Mindful of the need for speed, a team of Baltimore longshoremen immediately went to work loading the wobbly cargo aboard the trailer, taking care not to tear sheets of plastic wrapped tightly around the pallets to protect the rubber from scrapes.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
The port of Baltimore's largest shipping line still holds out faint hope for an agreement with local Longshoremen that will pave the way for a new cargo hub in the city. But Wallenius Wilhelmsen said yesterday that it has no plans to present another proposal to the union, which rejected the company's request for work rules changes in a 235-189 vote Tuesday. Maryland port officials are not giving up, saying they are discussing the possibility of another vote with union leadership. The union has rejected the contract addendum twice already, though the most recent vote failed by a slimmer margin.
NEWS
May 1, 2000
IF THE port of Baltimore loses the chance to become a hub for the world's largest "roll-on/ roll-off" shipping line, you can thank rank and file members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association. Four other ILA locals here approved work-rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, which carries more autos, farm equipment and heavy machinery than any of its competitors. But not Local 333, which resoundingly rebuffed the deal. That jeopardizes a 10-year contract with WWL that was expected to lead to a tripling of the line's Baltimore business.
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