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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
They don't call it wildlife for nothing. In South Carolina, a governor redefined the term "hiking on the Appalachian Trail," while in Bald Eagle, Pa., a flock of dead geese rained from the sky, the victims of a vicious downdraft during a February thunderstorm. And on the New Jersey Turnpike, Tammy the wild turkey was captured just before Thanksgiving at Exit 14B, after months of dodging cars, and given an E-ZPass to a local zoo. So without further ado, the staff and management of this column bring you our much-anticipated but seldom-remembered look back at the zany and misguided things performed by animals of the two- and four-legged variety.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
Gerda M. Deterer, one of Maryland's best-known animal advocates who was founder and president of Wildlife Rescue Inc., died of cancer Friday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Hampstead resident was 68. Gerda M. Reuss, whose parents were restaurateurs, was born and raised in Bad Kissingen, Germany, where she also attended high school. As a child, Mrs. Deterer began her lifelong interest in animals. "In those days, we had dogs and they were German shepherds. Also, Gerda was always out trying to help injured animals," said a sister, Hannelore Perkins, who lives in San Antonio.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
Almost everyone likes animals at least a little, but there's that handful who are born "animal people." So says Jennifer Keats Curtis. They pull over for wounded pigeons. They take in orphaned cats. They're the ones the neighbors stop by to visit if a stray mutt comes calling. It doesn't mean they know what they're doing. "So many people want to help animals, but honestly, a good heart isn't enough," says Curtis, a veteran journalist and children's author whose fourth illustrated book, "Baby Owl's Rescue," debuts under the Sylvan Dell insignia next month.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 12, 2009
Stand anywhere along Maryland's version of the big dig and there can be no doubt the Intercounty Connector is finally a reality after more than a half-century of angst. Huge earth-moving machines gouge red clay from what was once rolling hills and woods. Trucks pour rivers of concrete that will be bridges carrying thousands of vehicles between Montgomery and Prince George's counties. These are the obvious things that announce the coming of the 18.8-mile, $2.5 billion toll road with the official state designation of Route 200, better known as the ICC. However, it's the little stuff that has me walking and riding the route with Mike Baker, the project's environmental engineer.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold the second in a series of planning meetings for the Patuxent Research Refuge to help develop a plan for improvements in transportation for the refuge. Comments from members of the community are being sought to help with planning. The meeting will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, near Laurel. brad_knudsen@fws.gov. Youth corps The Patuxent Research Refuge will be host to a Youth Conservation Corps program this summer.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said yesterday that it plans to vote this week on a proposal to build a natural gas terminal in Sparrows Point and an 88-mile pipeline to Pennsylvania, despite a request to delay action until concerns about an endangered bat and a threatened turtle can be addressed. "The case is still scheduled for consideration Thursday," said Tamara Young Allen, a commission spokeswoman. "The commission could address the issues brought by the wildlife service and could approve [the project]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lindsey Citron and Lindsey Citron,lindsey.citron@baltsun.com | November 27, 2008
Take a night off from TV and experience crisp Baltimore air like never before. In a densely packed and populated city, it's easy to forget about the greener side of the state. It's even easier to forget how close to home it is. Wildlife and nature are, quite literally, right in Baltimore's backyard. The Gwynns Falls Trail stretches 15 miles to connect more than 30 neighborhoods in the Baltimore area. The trail consists of more than 1,200 acres, about 900 of which are forested. The trail association provides open access to bikers, hikers and joggers, as well as organized ways to take in the scenery, such as Campfire Hikes.
NEWS
By Sharon Guynup | November 10, 2008
In its final weeks, the Bush administration is pushing changes that could decimate threatened Chesapeake Bay wildlife, along with 1,353 at-risk species across the nation. The Interior Department posted a proposal over the summer for sweeping changes to the 35-year-old Endangered Species Act. They would eliminate mandatory scientific review by experts at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service of all federally approved development projects that might affect endangered plants or animals.
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