Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWildlife
IN THE NEWS

Wildlife

NEWS
By Brittany Santarpio, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Originally designed to lure in waterfowl, these Chesapeake icons will attract more people than birds at the Havre de Grace Decoy and Wildlife Art Festival. In its 30th year, the festival promises to deliver a sense of heritage to the region. Over a 140 artists will exhibit and sell their original work, while attendees enjoy retriever dog demonstrations, decoy carving competitions, live and silent auctions and children's activities. The plan: Festival guests can come and go as they please with a free shuttle service to all venues.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
Whether it's diving to feed stingrays, creating terrariums, interpreting exhibits or inspiring visitors about conservation, volunteers at the National Aquarium in Baltimore make a measurable impact. The hours they contributed last year equal 53 full-time jobs, a value of $2.4 million. And even with a slumping economy, overall service was up 5 percent in 2010 compared with the past three years. "It was a record year. These are jobs we never have to pay for because volunteers have stepped up," said Nancy Hotchkiss, senior director of visitor experiences at the National Aquarium.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
While most of the Chesapeake Bay's islands are slowly vanishing beneath the waves, one not far from Baltimore is staging a remarkable renaissance. Poplar Island, former hunting retreat, hangout for politicos and black cat farm, had nearly washed away by the late 1990s. But it's since been restored to the size it was when it was still a thriving 19th-century farming and fishing community, using muck dredged from the shipping channels leading to Baltimore just 34 miles to the northwest.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
The Intercounty Connector isn't finished yet, but already the new six-lane highway across the Washington suburbs is drawing traffic — beneath it. Deer hoofprints and tracks of raccoons and other small animals traverse the soft dirt floor of an oversized stream culvert under an almost completed stretch of highway near here. It's one of 10 wildlife crossings being installed along the 18-mile, $2 billion transportation project. Crews are still putting the finishing touches on the western half of the ICC, which is to open in early 2011, weather permitting.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
If you see a Madagascar hissing cockroach, call Baltimore police. The same goes for six turtles (one Eastern box, two northern maps and three red-ear sliders), two geckos (a gargoyle and a tangerine flat-tail) and a beloved 3-foot-long iguana named Zena. These are among the exotic wildlife stolen over the weekend during a break in at the city's Carrie Murray Nature Center in West Baltimore's Leakin Park, according to a police report filed Monday. Most of the animals were donated to the center after having been abused.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
NEWS
June 29, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay and the rich habitat it contains provide outstanding sporting opportunities for the region's millions of hunters, anglers and birders. As a Maryland resident sportsman, conservationist and professional wildlife biologist, I support the Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act, which is currently before Congress. The legislation would improve water quality and wildlife habitat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and ensure that generations of sportsmen and other outdoors enthusiasts will continue to enjoy the region's wildlife-oriented traditions.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The oil that began washing ashore Friday in Louisiana could devastate one of the richest coastal ecosystems in the country and cripple a major source of the nation's seafood, a top Maryland scientist warns. But Donald F. Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, said a rush to clean up oil smothering sensitive wetlands could risk further damage if not done right. Fish and shellfish, shorebirds and waterfowl, sea turtles and a host of other wildlife are at risk from the more than 200,000 gallons of oil pumping daily out of the ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 11, 2010
Federal wildlife agencies proposed Wednesday increased protections for loggerhead turtles along both U.S. coasts, including in Maryland. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's fisheries service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said they had determined that the status of seven of nine population groups of the turtles around the world had worsened to the point that they should be considered endangered, including those in the...
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 16, 2010
Winter weather might be bad for backs and spirits, but birds and squirrels are most likely doing just fine, according to wildlife specialists. Birds and animals can adapt and weather the storms that have otherwise crippled the Baltimore- Washington area. The birds can fly to new food sources. And all creatures tend to eat less during colder seasons and can go a couple of days without food if it's buried in snow. And, in general, feeding wildlife isn't recommended by most experts, though few would tell enthusiasts or the well-intentioned not to put up a bird feeder.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.