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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Jim McFadden was 79 years old when he strangled the swan. It was self-defense, he says. The retired salesman and his best hounds were hunting raccoons near his Kent County home, closing in on their quarry, when the swan charged out of the high grass. "Its mouth was open and its wings were flapping and it came right at me," said McFadden, now 84. "Then two or three other swans went after the dogs and scared the hell out of them." Della Shanahan has developed an entirely different relationship with the mute swans nesting near her Pasadena home.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
CHESTERTOWN -- Two young bald eagles watched from the branches of dead trees yesterday as a sudden shower swept a pond on DuPont's Chesapeake Farms property on Millstone Point.The rain, or the approach of humans, stirred a great blue heron from its hiding place in weeds at the water's edge. George Fahrman, 44, who has worked on the 3,300-acre preserve for more than 20 years, rolled his van to a stop."This is the middle of nowhere," he said. "On foot, it is probably a mile in any direction before you find civilization."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 30, 2002
HLUHLUWE-UMFOLOZI PARK, South Africa - This year, a hippo attacked a 22-year-old man near the tiny village of Khula in the lush coastal wetlands of KwaZulu-Natal province, leaving him paralyzed. Fearing for their community's safety, village leaders decided that enough was enough. It was time for the ornery family of nine hippos to go. At one time, residents would have reached for a gun to solve the problem. Instead, Khula's leaders did what more and more South African landowners do with unwanted game - put them up for auction.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1996
While the Blizzard of 1996 may seem like a catastrophe from a human point of view, Maryland's wildlife and the Chesapeake Bay should escape relatively unharmed from the 2 feet or more of snow blanketing the state -- unless it lingers or gets much worse.Deep snow covers up the acorns, nuts, grasses and other food that sustain wild animals and birds through the winter.It also could flood streams and bay tributaries with dirty, salt-laden runoff if it melts all at once.But state officials say not to worry, at least not yet."
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
FORGET THAT waterfront with million-dollar views. It's for pikers. Let's talk about the bay's new third-of-a-billion-dollar view. It's from Poplar Island, rebuilt over the past few years at a cost of about $327,000 per acre. The good news is that we taxpayers already own it, and tours are available to groups of eight or more (see below for details). I recently made the one-hour paddle in my kayak from the Talbot County mainland to check on the resurrection of Poplar Island, where the needs of commerce and wildlife are happily intersecting as they seldom do. A huge federal-state project to rebuild the eroded island with silt dredged from Baltimore's ship channels has created the only place in Maryland's mid-Chesapeake where one can enjoy 20 feet of elevation.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
The calendar tells us that these are the first days of fall. But for wild creatures making their home in the city, the autumn shuffle is already under way. They're moving along secret highways that parallel our own: the light-rail right of way, the JFX embankment, the banks of the city's streams, even the storm sewers. Some are just passing through on their way to winter homes. Others, the young adults of the animal world, are leaving the family home and looking for places of their own. And although we rarely notice them, they're making use of every spare corner of the city.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
Wildlife photography -- The Hollingsworth Art Gallery at the Patuxent Research Refuge, in the National Wildlife Visitor Center in Laurel, is showing the work of wildlife photographer Joan Anne Dubbs this month. The visitor center is at 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily, except federal holidays. 301-497-5760.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
MIAMI -- The woman on the phone was frantic. She'd jus seen five monkeys emerging from the smashed window of a neighbor's home. They'd been looting the house."
NEWS
December 13, 1995
An article in The Sun in Anne Arundel County on Friday stated incorrectly the kinds of animals cared for at Noah's Ark Wildlife Center in Lake Shore. The center cares only for injured or orphaned native Maryland wildlife.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
April 16, 2004
On April 14, 2004, MARY JANECULVERHOUSE. She leaves no surviving relatives Interment private. Memorial's in Mary Jane Culverhouse's name may be made to The National Wildlife federation, 11100 Wildlife Center Dr., Reston, VA 20190-5362. Arrangements by The Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
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