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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
C According to a nationwide survey taken for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, nearly 40 percent of adults enjoyed wildlife-related recreation last year and spent $101 billion in the process.The National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation was conducted last year by the U.S. Census Bureau for the USFWS.The survey has been taken every five years since 1955.The survey also showed the number of hunters and fishermen remains relatively unchanged from the 1991 report:There were 35.2 million fishermen (35.6 million in 1991)
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FEATURES
By TONY PERRY and TONY PERRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 18, 2006
Earth Day, the annual examination of our planetary well-being, is approaching, which means that environmental documentaries with their gloomy assessments are at the ready. This year is no exception - in fact they're gloomier than ever, which either says something about the state of the Earth or the state of documentaries. PBS lets loose with both barrels from 8 to 10 tonight: Dimming the Sun followed by The State of the Planet's Wildlife (MPT, Channels 22 and 67). Neither will be made into a Broadway musical anytime soon.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has appointed E. Joseph Lamp, a professor at Anne Arundel Community College, and Robert Gregory Jr., a Baltimore businessman, to the Wildlife Advisory Commission.The nine-person commission advises the Department of Natural Resources on wildlife management issues.Lamp is a former hunter and vice president of the Anne Arundel County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.Gregory is an avid outdoorsman and hunter and is the only African- American on the commission.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
Woodbine residents are used to seeing wildlife in their quiet community, which is dotted with farms and forests. But black bears - that's out of the ordinary. At least two residents saw one racing through the neighborhood Thursday afternoon, crossing yards and roads as it headed toward Carroll County. "When I saw the thing running through the field, I did a double-take," said MadgeJones, an eight-year resident of Woodbine who was driving home from a store about 2:45 p.m. She stopped her car, watched the bear cross in front of her and grabbed her cellular phone to call Howard County police.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
Almost everyone likes animals at least a little, but there's that handful who are born "animal people." So says Jennifer Keats Curtis. They pull over for wounded pigeons. They take in orphaned cats. They're the ones the neighbors stop by to visit if a stray mutt comes calling. It doesn't mean they know what they're doing. "So many people want to help animals, but honestly, a good heart isn't enough," says Curtis, a veteran journalist and children's author whose fourth illustrated book, "Baby Owl's Rescue," debuts under the Sylvan Dell insignia next month.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
GRASONVILLE - State and federal wildlife officials are looking for someone who killed a trumpeter swan Sunday that was part of a research project in which ultralight planes are being used to teach the birds to migrate to the Chesapeake region - where they have not been seen for more than 200 years. In an effort that mimics a successful experiment with Canada geese depicted in the 1996 movie "Fly Away Home," scientists coaxed 10 of the rare swans to the Horsehead Wetlands Center near Kent Island from upstate New York on Jan. 18. The birds, all fitted with collars and transmitters to allow scientists at the center to track their movements as they gradually learn to feed in the wild, were seen by researchers in a secluded area along Cabin Creek in Queen Anne's County around 11 a.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | November 4, 1990
SILVER RUN - A squirrel, a crow, a pheasant, two geese, a chipmunk and a rabbit call her Carroll farmhouse home.But Patty White swears she's entertaining few non-human visitors right now."This is the end of the season," said the county's nurse for injured and orphaned wildlife. "I generally have between 300 and 400 animals a year."In addition to the wild animals they "foster parent," the Whites own several dogs, cats, cockateels, horses and goats.The 29-year-old native of Prince George's County has loved animals all her life.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2001
Caring for two dozen monkeys and more than 100 other animals might be a kindly thing to do, but it cannot be considered a charitable endeavor, Howard County officials ruled this week in a setback for a much-contested wildlife sanctuary in Woodstock. The Howard County Board of Appeals on Tuesday night dismissed Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary's application for permission to continue operating the haven for homeless or wounded animals. Because the sanctuary serves exotic animals, not humans, it cannot qualify as a "charitable and philanthropic institution," the zoning category under which owner Colleen Layton filed for approval, the board decided.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 2001
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Alaska's largest city may be a booming urban center with a performing arts complex and upper-crust subdivisions, but Rick Sinnott's life is a tale of a very different place. A bear in the living room, a moose calf in a soccer net, wolves eating dogs - such are the matters that keep his cell phone ringing at all hours. At 4 a.m. Thursday, he was hunting two beavers whose dam-building handiwork was threatening to flood a downtown neighborhood. By 6 a.m., his phone was vibrating with calls about a black bear that had eluded him for a week as it raided trash cans and garages in a west-side neighborhood - the same bear, Sinnott says, that he tagged and moved 50 miles away several weeks ago. "He blew his one chance; he has to go to bear heaven," said Sinnott, a wildlife biologist for Alaska's Department of Fish and Game who answers the public's nuisance calls about wild things loose in the city - a man at the center of an escalating conflict between humans and the critters that share their environs.
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