Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWildlife Service
IN THE NEWS

Wildlife Service

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved a plan yesterday to allow Maryland officials to shoot about 3,000 mute swans over the next 10 years, a move they call necessary because the beautiful birds cause too much environmental damage. State wildlife biologists and technicians will begin shooting about 60 swans a week once they secure a federal permit in the next few days. Officials at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources say the shootings -- halted temporarily by a federal lawsuit in May -- will help control an invasive species that eats millions of pounds of aquatic grasses vital to the health of the Chesapeake Bay. "Assuming we can get cooperation from wind, weather and tide, we'll begin operating in the field as soon as possible," said Jonathan McKnight, associate director of habitat conservation for DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act; astute, visionary legislation that's served as our nation's lifeline for plants, fish, and wildlife on the brink of extinction. The act has since become one of the strongest and most important laws we have for protecting and restoring the native species of our continent. Thanks to Endangered Species Act, Americans can delight in the sight of bald eagle soaring over the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, hear the howls of wolves in Yellowstone National Park and witness the magnificent breeching of a humpback whale off the coast of California.
NEWS
December 23, 1993
The names of Sarah Filkins, an architectural consultant for Historic Annapolis Foundation, and Robert C. Zepp, assistant supervisor of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Annapolis, were misspelled in yesterday's editions of the Sun for Anne Arundel County.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 16, 1991
If Tydings Owen McGinnis had known selling 45 stuffed Canada geese decoys was a federal offense, he says he certainly wouldn't have advertised the sale of the birds in the newspaper."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | March 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bowing to pressure from the Maryland congressional delegation, the U.S. Department of the Interior backed away yesterday, at least temporarily, from closing the Patuxent Wildlife Center on weekdays and raising fees at the Blackwater Wildlife Refuge on the Eastern Shore.The Patuxent center, an 8,100-acre site in Anne Arundel County off Route 197, reopened yesterday, a week after it was closed on weekdays.The fee increase at Blackwater was scheduled to take effect May 1.The closing of Patuxent on weekdays and the fee increase at Blackwater have been delayed until Oct. 1 pending Interior Department review.
NEWS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Marina Sarris and John Rivera contributed to this article | August 5, 1995
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, concerned that the Atlantic Flyway population of migratory Canada geese is on the verge of collapse, yesterday suspended the hunting season in Maryland and the rest of the flyway states for a minimum of one year.State waterfowl managers, however, said that the moratorium could last three years or longer."When the flyway council looked at all the newest information," said Joshua Sandt, director of the Wildlife Division of Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, "[the decision]
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
Where tanks once rumbled in mock battle, bird watchers will soon stroll.Six months after transferring 8,100 acres at Fort Meade to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Army formally dedicated the land yesterday as "a place where nature can resume its peaceful course."Secretary of the Army Michael Stone passed the final documents marking the transfer to Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan Jr. as members of Maryland's congressional delegation, state officials and park volunteers huddled against the chill.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | May 29, 1993
Six whoooping cranes born and raised at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center near Laurel are to be shipped to Canada next week as part of an international effort to save the endangered species.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which operates the Patuxent research center, is shipping the birds to the Calgary Zoological Society in Alberta, Canada, to establish a third captive flock and guard against the chance that an epidemic or disaster might erase the cranes' 26-year recovery.Whooping cranes, the tallest birds in North America at about 5 feet, have been deemed endangered since 1967.
SPORTS
By Paul A. Smith, MCT | January 5, 2013
More Americans hunted, fished and watched wildlife in 2011 than five years earlier, according to final statistics released last month by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "This is good news for our lifestyles and our economy," said Dan Ashe, director of the service. The results are from the 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, an outdoor participation survey the agency has conducted since 1955. The survey results are released every five years.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Maryland's first industrial-scale wind energy project would be required under a federal plan issued Monday to slow down its turbines at certain times of the year to reduce the number of endangered bats that might be killed by the long, spinning blades. Exelon Power, which owns and operates the 28-turbine Criterion wind project in Garrett County, also would have to protect one or more bat caves in other states to make up for any federally protected Indiana bats its turbines might harm.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Some of Dr. Maria Brown's young patients won't be getting a prescription they can fill at a pharmacy. Instead, they'll be instructed to fill their lungs with fresh air, feel the sunlight on their skin and stretch their muscles in the great outdoors. They will be told to walk around the block, visit a nature center or take a bike ride with their parents. Brown is a nature champion, trained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to teach other health care providers at St. Agnes Hospital about the benefits of getting children outside to combat obesity and accompanying diseases such as diabetes and asthma.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 16, 2009
The federal agency that regulates energy approved a proposal yesterday to build a natural gas terminal on the site of the former Sparrows Point shipyard in eastern Baltimore County, rejecting nearly three years' worth of opposition from area elected officials and the project's would-be neighbors. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission acted on the proposal - which also includes construction of an 88-mile pipeline to Pennsylvania - despite calls from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Maryland's congressional delegation to postpone the vote.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said yesterday that it plans to vote this week on a proposal to build a natural gas terminal in Sparrows Point and an 88-mile pipeline to Pennsylvania, despite a request to delay action until concerns about an endangered bat and a threatened turtle can be addressed. "The case is still scheduled for consideration Thursday," said Tamara Young Allen, a commission spokeswoman. "The commission could address the issues brought by the wildlife service and could approve [the project]
NEWS
By Lynda Robinson | October 17, 1990
Wild mountain lions haven't roamed Maryland for almost 200 years, but Baltimore County police and state wildlife officials were beating the bushes in a Randallstown field last night in search of one.At least three people claimed they saw a mountain lion in a field in the 3700 block of Burmont Avenue -- a residential area where deer and squirrels might be found, but certainly not lions, tigers or bears.Police sent a helicopter to scan the area, and the state Department of Natural Resources' Forest, Park and Wildlife Service set out a trap.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | February 9, 2007
Richard Maurice of Street spied a flock of geese late last month, very high and headed south, but oddly late for their fall migration. He asked: "Do you think it's possible they waited until it finally turned cold before they continued on their journey?" Good call. Holiday Obrecht, a refuge biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said mild weather, open water and ready food sources allowed some flocks to pause well north of their usual wintering grounds. When it turned cold, they resumed their flight south.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | January 10, 2009
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has called on federal energy officials to delay a decision on the proposed liquefied natural gas terminal at Sparrows Point until questions about endangered and threatened species can be answered. The service, a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior, has found that the project would be located in an environmentally sensitive area and could affect several species with habitats in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Those include the bald eagle, peregrine falcon and Delmarva fox squirrel.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Patuxent Research Refuge will hold a centennial celebration of the birth of environmental pioneer and author Rachel Carson. The celebration is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Rachel Carson Council. The celebration will begin with a ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday at the refuge's National Wildlife Visitor Center, near Laurel. After the ceremony, programs will include live animals, hands-on activities, nature hikes and habitat tram tours.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.