Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWildlife Sanctuary
IN THE NEWS

Wildlife Sanctuary

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary, in Woodstock, relies on the kindness of strangers. Strangers bring injured and abandoned animals to the 4-acre site, where they are sheltered and nursed to health. And strangers volunteer at the nonprofit organization, which has no paid staff. Heather Wandell has been volunteering at Frisky's since her son, now 22, spent a summer volunteering there before his sophomore year at Mt. Hebron High School. He moved on to other interests, but Wandell was hooked.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TOM PELTON | October 14, 2006
State prosecutors charged the 52-year-old director of a wildlife sanctuary with fraud yesterday for receiving $150,000 for a wetlands on the Eastern Shore that officials say she never built. Dianne D. Pearce, head of the nonprofit Chesapeake Wildlife Sanctuary, could receive up to 5 years in prison and a $3,000 fine and be forced to give back the money if convicted, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. She could not be reached for comment. Eight years ago, Pearce's organization received 88 acres of land in Worcester County from Perdue Farms, plus $150,000, with the agreement that the group would build a wetlands to improve the environment, according to a complaint filed in Worcester County Circuit Court.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
In a deal hailed as a model for land preservation in lean budget times, a wealthy businessman has agreed to give up development rights — and grant limited but free public access — to a 950-acre former wildlife sanctuary on the Eastern Shore that he bought 18 months ago. Robert A. Pascal, a businessman and former Anne Arundel County executive, agreed to donate to the state a permanent conservation easement on the former du Pont family hunting preserve...
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1995
In the latest incident in a destructive wave that has cost the county's Bureau of Parks thousands of dollars so far this year, vandals have struck an urban wildlife sanctuary in Ellicott City.Only about three weeks after park employees installed nearly a dozen informational signs along the sanctuary's walking paths in David W. Force Park, vandals defaced three of them late last month.The signs explain the various ecosystems -- such as meadows, forests and wetlands -- along the sanctuary's trails, said Mark Raab, supervisor of land management for the parks department.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 8, 1991
Your own back yard probably isn't what comes to mind when you think of a wildlife sanctuary. But wildlife is feeling the squeeze everywhere. Your patch can make a difference.Habitat is the technical name for any area that provides an animal with food, water, shelter and a place to raise its young. By keeping these basics in mind when you plant your garden, you can make your yard habitat to a host of species.Not all wild animal species are appropriate in residential areas, however. Your neighbors won't appreciate it if you encourage urban pests such as raccoons and possums.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Timothy B. Wheeler contributed to this article | May 23, 1997
A Florida woman has donated a 948-acre Talbot County farm, with eight miles of Chesapeake Bay waterfront, to the National Audubon Society, which will use it as a wildlife sanctuary and an ecological education center."
NEWS
August 26, 1991
Mandarin Construction Co., a leading builder in Anne Arundel County,is now engaged in its first-ever Eastern Shore project, a private residential community on Kent Island.Dubbed "Crosswinds," the community is located at the southern tip of the island, and includes 76 acres set aside as a wildlife sanctuary.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1997
Three communities have received Wildlife Sanctuary Certification from the Home Builders Association of Maryland (HBAM).RTC Shelter Development at Park View Laurel, Magers Landing and the Villages at Woodbine were recognized for their work to preserve and create wildlife habitats and, in some instances, educating community residents.Shelter Development at Park View Laurel was awarded for its creation of a residential wildlife enhancement program using native landscapes.Landscaping a storm-water pool with aquatic plants, the senior housing community is hoping to attract waterfowl and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
Howard County's first urban wildlife sanctuary, designed as a pastoral setting for animals and humans alike, has instead annoyed residents of a nearby Laurel neighborhood.Hillcrest Heights residents say Patuxent Springs, a 70-lot residential community, has been a constant source of irritation. The 43-acre site features indigenous plants and shrubs, bird houses and storm water retention ponds."There's this tremendous racket from back there," John Lind said of frogs who live near the retention ponds.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON | October 14, 2006
State prosecutors charged the 52-year-old director of a wildlife sanctuary with fraud yesterday for receiving $150,000 for a wetlands on the Eastern Shore that officials say she never built. Dianne D. Pearce, head of the nonprofit Chesapeake Wildlife Sanctuary, could receive up to 5 years in prison and a $3,000 fine and be forced to give back the money if convicted, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. She could not be reached for comment. Eight years ago, Pearce's organization received 88 acres of land in Worcester County from Perdue Farms, plus $150,000, with the agreement that the group would build a wetlands to improve the environment, according to a complaint filed in Worcester County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
A bill that would have guaranteed the continued existence of Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary in western Howard County was killed on an ironic 3-2 vote by the County Council last night. The deciding "no" vote was cast by newly appointed member Charles C. Feaga, a western county Republican who replaced the bill's sponsor, Allan H. Kittleman, who left the council in October to take his late father's seat in the state Senate. "We felt very differently on it," Feaga said, adding that Kittleman had lobbied him late yesterday to support a last-ditch compromise amendment supported by two Democrats, council Chairman Guy Guzzone, who represents North Laurel-Savage, and east Columbia's David A. Rakes.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2002
WITH THE ONCE rural lands of southern Carroll County rapidly giving way to development, the Audubon Society of Central Maryland is striving to preserve a habitat for wild animals. The group, which claims more than 1,000 members in the area, maintains two wildlife sanctuaries encompassing more than 270 acres. "We're losing wildlife habitat by acres every year," said Bill Becraft of Mount Airy, volunteer manager of the Audrey Carroll Wildlife Sanctuary near Mount Airy and the Fred Archibald Sanctuary outside New Market.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2001
Reversing its ruling of three months ago, the Howard County Board of Appeals ruled last night that Frisky's Wildlife Sanctuary in Woodstock can apply for zoning approval as a charitable operation. The unanimous reversal offers a reprieve for Frisky's owner Colleen Layton, who has cared for wounded and homeless pets and wildlife, in addition to about two dozen monkeys, at her home on Old Frederick Road since 1994. In January, the board ruled that Frisky's could not apply for approval as a charitable operation, saying that the category applied only to places that served people, not animals.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
At any given time, Colleen Layton has about 100 homeless and wounded animals under her care at Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary in Woodstock, in addition to the two dozen monkeys that are her permanent guests. Judging by the many calls and letters flooding Howard County offices, Layton may have nearly as many humans turning out in her support tomorrow night. That's when the county Board of Appeals will hold its latest hearing on Frisky's, whose effort to gain county zoning approval is in doubt.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Gray squirrels, mockingbirds and other wildlife won't have to flee their nests when a housing development opens next month in Laurel.Patuxent Springs, a 70-lot residential community, has been designated Howard County's first urban wildlife sanctuary by the National Institute for Urban Wildlife in Columbia."
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1999
ABIRDSEED SALE TO benefit Mount Airy's Audrey Carroll Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, off Old Annapolis Road, is being held this month.Local volunteers, including Scouts and Linganore High School's Ecology Club, have donated their time to help the sanctuary promote environmental education, habitat restoration and preservation, and good stewardship of natural areas.As part of the National Audubon Society, the goals of the Audrey Carroll Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary include conserving and restoring natural ecosystems, focusing on birds and other wildlife for the benefit of humanity and the earth's biological diversity.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.