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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
An area near Laurel where the Army used to practice blowing things to bits is going to the birds.It is going to killdeer that lay eggs in gravel, to hawks circling for food, to geese nesting on huge X-shaped islands in a pond built on an old munitions testing ground. A control tower for the firing range now is a bird-observation deck.The 35-acre habitat, part of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, will open officially to the public tomorrow. It has three types of wetlands to attract a variety of fowl and a wildlife viewing area to attract the public.
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By Clara H. Vaughn | October 18, 2011
A new whooping crane observatory at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center will allow the public to see the endangered cranes up-close and year-round for the first time. A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the observatory was held at the research center's 75th anniversary celebration and Wildlife Festival Saturday, Oct. 15, while live footage of the cranes streamed from the observatory. "Only a handful of people have seen whooping cranes," Greg Smith, director of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, said.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
An area near Laurel where the Army used to practice blowing things to bits is going to the birds.It is going to killdeer that lay eggs in gravel, to hawks circling for food, to geese nesting on huge X-shaped islands in a pond built on an old munitions testing ground. A control tower for the firing range now is a bird-observation deck.The 35-acre habitat, part of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, officially will open to the public tomorrow. It has three types of wetlands aimed at attracting a variety of fowl and a wildlife viewing area aimed at attracting the public.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | November 4, 2007
Forty years ago, wildlife managers and utility engineers struck a deal to keep power flowing to the growing Washington region without destroying the wooded bottomlands of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. The Potomac Electric Power Co. would clear-cut a right-of-way for electric lines across an upland portion of the reserve, but manage the 250-foot-wide utility corridor as a unique "scrub-shrub" habitat friendly to migratory birds. Four decades later, the plan is working - in critical ways neither side predicted.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
Where tanks once rumbled in mock battle, bird watchers will soon stroll.Six months after transferring 8,100 acres at Fort Meade to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Army formally dedicated the land yesterday as "a place where nature can resume its peaceful course."Secretary of the Army Michael Stone passed the final documents marking the transfer to Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan Jr. as members of Maryland's congressional delegation, state officials and park volunteers huddled against the chill.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
A 400-acre park and athletic facility for West County is being opposed by county environmental groups, who contend that ball fields, picnic pavilions and parking lots are incompatible with the forested site.The county Department of Parks and Recreation has asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for permission to build a park on a portion of the 8,100 acres transferred from Fort Meade to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.But a coalition of county environmental groups has urged Hal J. O'Connor, director of the Laurel-based research center, to reject the county's proposal.
NEWS
September 22, 1993
North tract of center to stay openThe north tract of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, scheduled to close on weekdays as of Oct. 1, will remain open under legislation approved by the U.S. Senate last week.Senators also approved the final $1.35 million that the center needs to complete a visitors center."When completed next year, the visitors center will offer a unique opportunity to educate the public, especially the nation's youth, about the importance of wildlife research and conservation," said Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
To Rick McGill, the vast acreage that makes up the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center on what used to be a Fort Meade firing range is a virtually untouched historical landmark.Since last summer, the Laurel police officer, who lives in Severn, has been researching the significance of the land. The nearly 9,000 acres were part of the Snowden plantation more than 200 years ago.No surprises have turned up so far, but Mr. McGill said he and a friend want to locate the foundations of at least two old mansions that exist somewhere on the property.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | September 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The moment may go unnoticed by the property's tenants -- such as the nesting bald eagles, the herds of deer and the trilling songbirds -- but one of the largest undeveloped tracts in central Maryland officially changes hands today.About 7,600 acres that formerly belonged to the U.S. Army's Fort George G. Meade will now fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel.The transfer, which was approved under a deal between the Maryland congressional delegation and the Bush administration last year, will cause much rejoicing among residents in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties as well as environmentalists who wanted to see the land preserved in its pristine state.
NEWS
May 15, 1995
Wild turkeys have returned to a 35-acre parcel of land near Laurel. Killdeer, hawks, eagles, ducks, snakes, frogs and dragonflies keep them company. They all have found a home on this former Army firing range thanks to a joint effort by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.The addition to the Patuxent River Wildlife Research Center represents a marriage of needs between the utility company and the government. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the property as part of military base reductions at Fort George G. Meade, but the government lacked the money to develop the wildlife refuge.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Just off the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, hidden about a mile back in the thick woods south of the Patuxent River, is a multimillion-dollar building that is one of the metropolitan area's best kept secrets.The National Wildlife Visitor Center, on the southern border of Fort Meade, is suburban Maryland's answer to the National Aquarium in Baltimore. It focuses on the endangered animals that make the 12,750-acre Patuxent Research Refuge their home and on what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the researchers at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, in one corner of the refuge, are doing to save them.
NEWS
May 15, 1995
Wild turkeys have returned to a 35-acre parcel of land near Laurel. Killdeer, hawks, eagles, ducks, snakes, frogs and dragonflies keep them company. They all have found a home on this former Army firing range thanks to a joint effort by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.The addition to the Patuxent River Wildlife Research Center represents a marriage of needs between the utility company and the government. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the property as part of military base reductions at Fort George G. Meade, but the government lacked the money to develop the wildlife refuge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
An area near Laurel where the Army used to practice blowing things to bits is going to the birds.It is going to killdeer that lay eggs in gravel, to hawks circling for food, to geese nesting on huge X-shaped islands in a pond built on an old munitions testing ground. A control tower for the firing range now is a bird-observation deck.The 35-acre habitat, part of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, will open officially to the public tomorrow. It has three types of wetlands to attract a variety of fowl and a wildlife viewing area to attract the public.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
An area near Laurel where the Army used to practice blowing things to bits is going to the birds.It is going to killdeer that lay eggs in gravel, to hawks circling for food, to geese nesting on huge X-shaped islands in a pond built on an old munitions testing ground. A control tower for the firing range now is a bird-observation deck.The 35-acre habitat, part of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, officially will open to the public tomorrow. It has three types of wetlands aimed at attracting a variety of fowl and a wildlife viewing area aimed at attracting the public.
NEWS
September 22, 1993
North tract of center to stay openThe north tract of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, scheduled to close on weekdays as of Oct. 1, will remain open under legislation approved by the U.S. Senate last week.Senators also approved the final $1.35 million that the center needs to complete a visitors center."When completed next year, the visitors center will offer a unique opportunity to educate the public, especially the nation's youth, about the importance of wildlife research and conservation," said Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | March 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite protests from the Maryland congressional delegation, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Anne Arundel County will be closed to weekday visitors beginning today.The area being closed consists of the center's north tract, which was transferred from Fort Meade in 1991 and has drawn an estimated 50,000 visitors for hiking, fishing, hunting and other outdoor activities. Most of the center's middle and southern tracts are off limits to the public.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the center, says it doesn't have the money to keep the land open during the week.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | March 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite protests from the Maryland congressional delegation, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Anne Arundel County will be closed to weekday visitors beginning today.The area being closed consists of the center's north tract, which was transferred from Fort Meade in 1991 and has drawn an estimated 50,000 visitors for hiking, fishing, hunting and other outdoor activities. Most of the center's middle and southern tracts are off limits to the public.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages the center, says it doesn't have the money to keep the land open during the week.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
A 400-acre park and athletic facility for West County is being opposed by county environmental groups, who contend that ball fields, picnic pavilions and parking lots are incompatible with the forested site.The county Department of Parks and Recreation has asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for permission to build a park on a portion of the 8,100 acres transferred from Fort Meade to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.But a coalition of county environmental groups has urged Hal J. O'Connor, director of the Laurel-based research center, to reject the county's proposal.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
To Rick McGill, the vast acreage that makes up the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center on what used to be a Fort Meade firing range is a virtually untouched historical landmark.Since last summer, the Laurel police officer, who lives in Severn, has been researching the significance of the land. The nearly 9,000 acres were part of the Snowden plantation more than 200 years ago.No surprises have turned up so far, but Mr. McGill said he and a friend want to locate the foundations of at least two old mansions that exist somewhere on the property.
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