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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Masonville Cove , a reclaimed stretch of South Baltimore's industrial waterfront, has earned a new distinction -- the nation's first "urban wildlife refuge partnership. " U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to announce the designation Thursday morning at the 11-acre nature area that's been developed by the Maryland Port Administration in a formerly abandoned and contaminated stretch of Baltimore's harbor. It's not a federal takeover, but the beginning of a new cooperative effort by the wildlife service to instill conservation values in urban residents, especially youth.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
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NEWS
December 14, 1995
THE REPUBLICAN congressional drive to weaken environmental laws continues with riders tacked onto crucial agency appropriations and budget bills. Near the top of this list is the budget reconciliation provision to allow oil drilling and exploitation in the fragile coastal plain wilderness of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.Pushed by Alaska politicians to restore their dwindling oil-revenue kitty that pays annual $1,000 entitlements to all state taxpayers (who also pay no sales or income taxes)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Heading into town from the west on U.S. 40, drivers take a bridge across the Susquehanna River and cut through treetops reaching up from another world below the rumbling road. It's green down there on Garrett Island, and busy with the activity of many creatures, if not people. People have been pinning their aspirations on Garrett Island since the 1600s, when one Englishman talked about building a college there. But lately, these 198 acres are reserved chiefly for plants, trees and nonhuman actors.
NEWS
May 9, 2001
THE DECISION to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge will have an enormous impact on the residents of Alaska -- and on that fragile wilderness environment. Oil from Alaska's North Slope has transformed the lives of people living in that remote, vast state, as The Sun's Marego Athans reported in the series "Wilds vs. Wealth" that concludes today. Oil profits fund schools, health clinics, satellite TV and air transportation links in long-neglected, isolated villages. Oil provides a yearly $2,000 check for residents, pays 80 percent of the state budget, and lets Alaskans forgo state income and sales taxes.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | February 28, 2006
Local officials have told the developer of a proposed resort and conference center near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge to modify his plans, a move that is expected to delay the project for several months. The Cambridge City Council had been scheduled to vote on the final plan for the 3,200-home subdivision last night. But the vote has been put off while the developer, Duane E.E. Zentgraf, prepares a redesign that moves about 180 homes so they are at least 1,000 feet from the Little Blackwater River, said Anne Roane, city planner.
NEWS
November 24, 2000
IT'S AN EASY choice for the departing president: Preserve America's last great wilderness in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge or let it be laid to waste for a six-month supply of oil. Under repeated siege from oil companies clamoring to drill in this unique coastal plain -- as they may already do in the other 95 percent of Alaska's North Slope -- the northeast corner of this refuge deserves immediate, permanent protection as a national monument....
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 24, 1996
A wait of nearly three decades may be nearing an end for naturalists and ornithologists seeking the establishment of a wildlife refuge in the Middle Patuxent valley.By the middle of next week, Rouse Co. expects to transfer a 1,000-acre parcel known as the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area to Howard County's Dedpartment of Recreation and Parks -- the department's largest acquisition.The transfer of the land between Columbia and the Village of River Hill will cost the county about $1.8 million.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Cambridge -- The Chesapeake Bay Foundation joined local residents yesterday in calling on the governor to intervene and stop a 3,200-home subdivision planned on the doorstep of the Chesapeake region's largest wildlife refuge. William C. Baker, president of the environmental group, said it is "ironic and cynical" for the Blackwater Resort project to hijack the name of the nearby Blackwater Wildlife Refuge that would be harmed by the suburban sprawl. "There comes a time when you have to draw a line in the sand, and say, `No not here,'" Baker said, standing in front of the 1,080 acres of farms and wetland that would be consumed.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
As a state commission considers voting today on whether to allow a 2,700-home golf resort near Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, it must weigh whether state law prohibits such intense development in an area surrounded by protected wetlands and farms. But even as debate over the $1 billion Blackwater Resort continues, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. - whose administration had called approval of the project a mostly local decision - is studying requests to preserve some of the land with state money, an aide said yesterday.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
Run for the Refuge and help raise funds for its research and education missions, Sunday, Sept. 29, starting at 9 a.m., at the North Tract entrance, off Route 198. Turn at Bald Eagle Drive and travel 1 mile to the Visitor Contact Station. This special 5K fundraising race is sponsored by Friends of Patuxent and benefits the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and Refuge. To register, go to runfortherefuge.com or Friends of Patuxent on Facebook.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Masonville Cove , a reclaimed stretch of South Baltimore's industrial waterfront, has earned a new distinction -- the nation's first "urban wildlife refuge partnership. " U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to announce the designation Thursday morning at the 11-acre nature area that's been developed by the Maryland Port Administration in a formerly abandoned and contaminated stretch of Baltimore's harbor. It's not a federal takeover, but the beginning of a new cooperative effort by the wildlife service to instill conservation values in urban residents, especially youth.
NEWS
Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
Ronald M. Tillier, a retired Ford Motor Co. executive and longtime Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge volunteer, died Sunday. He was 72. Mr. Tillier, who enjoyed competitive clay and skeet shooting, was attending a meet Sunday afternoon in Kennedyville on the Eastern Shore when he was stricken. "He was just preparing to call for targets to be thrown by the trapper when he simply dropped where he was standing," said his wife of 48 years, the former Margaret "Peggy" Clare.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2011
The Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge - home to migrating ducks and geese along with the bald eagle and Delmarva fox squirrel - will be taken over by a bunch of sweaty bicyclists when the USA Triathlon National Long Course Duathlon Championship comes to the 27,000-acre preserve in Cambridge next June. "It's a great place to hold an event," said TriColumbia president Robert Vigorito, whose organization also hosts the Iron Girl Columbia Triathlon as well as the the Ironman 70.3 EagleMan, a qualifying event for the world's most famous Ironman event in Hawaii This marks the second time that Vigorito's organization has held a duathlon in the refuge.
EXPLORE
June 7, 2011
Birdwatchers, hikers, photographers and angles will have more hours to enjoy the Patuxent Research Refuge facilities in Laurel as the refuge extends its hours for public visitation this summer. Beginning Friday, June 10 and continuing through Aug. 13, the North Tract entrance to the refuge on Route 198, in Anne Arundel County, will remain open until 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings. Then entrance opens at 8 a.m. daily. The walking trails of the National Wildlife Visitor Center, off Powder Mill Road between Route 197 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, will remain open until 7 p.m. on Tuesdays for "Twilight Tuesdays," June 14 through Aug. 16. The visitor center grounds open at dawn so that birdwatchers, wildlife photographers and others can enjoy the trails.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
Release of proposals for bay cleanup is delayed a day The promised public release Wednesday of new federal proposals for jump-starting the lagging Chesapeake Bay restoration was delayed by a day and is now planned Thursday, officials said. The state and federal bay "partnership" had announced that it would release a series of draft reports outlining proposals for accelerating the pace of cleaning up the Chesapeake and safeguarding its fish and wildlife Wednesday. But late in the morning, Jim Edwards, deputy director of EPA's bay program office, said the documents were still being finalized, particularly one report that focuses on restoring and maintaining the bay's "living resources," including bay grasses, oysters, crabs, fish and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Heading into town from the west on U.S. 40, drivers take a bridge across the Susquehanna River and cut through treetops reaching up from another world below the rumbling road. It's green down there on Garrett Island, and busy with the activity of many creatures, if not people. People have been pinning their aspirations on Garrett Island since the 1600s, when one Englishman talked about building a college there. But lately, these 198 acres are reserved chiefly for plants, trees and nonhuman actors.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Fierce four-inch talons grip a perch at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.As visitors pass the iron-girded cage, Moose the bald eagle turns away disinterestedly.Twenty-five years ago, a young boy captured her near Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. Today, she is all that remains of the Patuxent center's efforts to save the bald eagle.The center's research solved the mystery of DDT, a pesticide that decimated eagle populations two decades ago, and has led to the resurgence of a species once threatened with extinction.
NEWS
March 22, 2009
Events scheduled at Patuxent center The Friends of Patuxent will present the 20th annual Patuxent Wildlife Art Show and Sale from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. March 29 at the recently reopened National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, Laurel. An artists' reception, with hors d'oeuvres, live music and a silent auction fundraiser, will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday. Tickets are $40 in advance; $45 at the door. Information or to order tickets: 301-497-5789 or www.friendspwrc.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold the second in a series of planning meetings for the Patuxent Research Refuge to help develop a plan for improvements in transportation for the refuge. Comments from members of the community are being sought to help with planning. The meeting will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, near Laurel. brad_knudsen@fws.gov. Youth corps The Patuxent Research Refuge will be host to a Youth Conservation Corps program this summer.
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