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Wildlife Habitat

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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | April 17, 1991
Hoping to preserve 470 largely wooded acres as a wildlife habitat, aFort Meade advisory panel is urging the Army to nearly halve the amount of surplus Meade land targeted for possible development.Developing the land, part of 1,400 surplus acres not being turned over to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, would require bulldozing hundredsof acres of dense forest that is home to many species of wildlife, the Fort Meade Coordinating Council says. Development also would endanger environmentally sensitive wetlands, worsen traffic congestion anddestroy historical sites and artifacts, members said.
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NEWS
January 13, 2014
With so many people interested in eating locally, buying locally, and creating a more sustainable environment, your recent article was very timely ("Resolve to add native plants in 2014," Jan. 9). The insights may be ideas many have heard before, but the reminder to focus on buying what is native, grows well in this zone and promises maximum benefit to the insects and animals that delight our days could not have come at a better time. We need more of these local writings helping guide our garden planning and buying patterns and pointing to the ways each of us affects quality of life issues.
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NEWS
By Dave Foster and Dave Foster,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 29, 1999
By late spring, Patterson Park Boat Lake could be on its way to becoming more environmentally sound when renovations are launched, including a stone wall that would encompass the 2.5 acre body of water, project consultants say.About 30 community members gathered at Patterson Park Recreation Center last week to review and discuss preliminary plans for the lake work, which were drawn up by KCI Technologies Inc. of Baltimore. The project will be put out to bid in early spring, organizers say.While some neighborhood residents expressed reservations about replacing the 3-foot-high fence around the lake with a stone wall that's closer to the water and could allow easier access to the lake, most went away convinced it would not be a safety hazard, officials said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A sprawling paint factory in industrial South Baltimore might be the last place you'd expect to attract hummingbirds. But Sherwin-Williams might now start drawing nectar-loving birds and more with native wildflowers, American beautyberry and pine trees it's planting at its manufacturing complex on Hollins Ferry Road. The effort is aimed at creating a more pleasant workplace, enhancing the neighborhood and helping clean up the harbor. Sherwin-Williams is one of a handful of companies - some with checkered environmental records - that have signed on to spruce up their properties, part of a new initiative to enlist businesses, nonprofits and government agencies there in helping to boost the city's anemic tree canopy, attract more wildlife and restore its degraded urban waters.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON and ROBERT A. ERLANDSON,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
A bald eagle glided majestically to a bare treetop; a pair of red-tailed hawks perched in another tree. Wild ducks bobbed on the tidal ponds. A blue heron rose from the marsh grass. Traces of foxes were evident, and deer hoofprints dented the soft earth.The only jarring element in this peaceful picture: the silhouettes of graders and bulldozers leveling a 10-acre section of Southwest Area Park, at the mouth of the Patapsco River in Baltimore Highlands, for two long-delayed baseball diamonds and a comfort station.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
The owner of a Sullivan Cove marsh who wants to build a house on stilts above his land says he will probably ask a judge to overturn the county Board of Appeals' rejection of his plans.F. Nicholas Codd, a Severna Park optician, said he is "90 percent" sure he will appeal to Circuit Court the written opinion issued last week.Mr. Codd, whose family has owned the quarter-acre lot for 32 years, has tentative approval from some state and federal agencies to build a 1,720-square-foot house on a platform above the marsh.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Another 112 acres of wetlands are being added to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, federal officials announced Wednesday. The Blackwater acquisition for $505,000 is part of more than 6,200 acres of wildlife habitat being preserved at seven refuges nationwide, according to the Department of Interior. The purchases are being paid for with more than $6 million from sales of federal duck hunting stamps. Maryland's Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski hailed the announcement, noting that the refuge is one of Dorchester County's top tourist attractions.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
Near Manchester, Bennett V. Bray Jr. and his wife, Barbara, are digging up part of the lawn on their 9-acre property to plant water gardens and shrubs for the wild animals who share their land.In the Lake Walker neighborhood of Baltimore, Alison Gillespie gets excited when she sees worms, bees, butterflies and birds in her "tiniest back yard imaginable" behind a city rowhouse.In Annapolis, organic gardener Jo Ann Alspaw shares the fruit she grows on her one-third-acre lot near Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium with birds.
NEWS
April 4, 2004
Friday is deadline to apply for U.S. wildlife program Farmers and landowners interested in participating in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program have until Friday to apply. Maryland and the District of Columbia have received $352,000 from the 2002 Farm Bill for the restoration of wildlife habitat through the voluntary conservation program, which provides technical and financial assistance to landowners and managers to restore upland, wetland and riparian habitats on their properties.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
THE 31-ACRE tract on Cape Knoll by the Bird River would make a handsome addition to Mariner Point Park in southern Harford County. But the environmentally sensitive land in Joppatowne could also be used for residential development. The decision depends on the price - and on enforcement of state environmental laws. With wetlands, steep slopes, wildlife habitat and coastline, the land faces significant legal restrictions on development, regardless of county zoning designation. Those important protections should be enforced.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Although by all accounts the Maryland legislature had a very productive session, legislators fell short in protecting the land that most sustains us - our farmland. While we applaud the successful defense of open space funding overall, for the second year in a row, both the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Fund and the Rural Legacy Program were slashed. This year they lost a combined $8.7 million. The trend and timing of these cuts is alarming. In addition to providing a host of benefits, starting with our food, farmland is central to meeting the Chesapeake Bay restoration goals to which Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay states and the District of Columbia have committed.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2012
Proving once again that it's always better to be late than not at all, the state has finally completed a new "nature area" at Masonville Cove , the second act in a $153 million restoration of a longtime dumping ground on the southern side of Baltimore's harbor. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and assorted dignitaries turned out Wednesday to mark the official opening of the 11-acre waterfront park, which features walking trails and a pier for fishing or launching canoes and kayaks.  Brown joined students from the Friendship Academy in planting wetland grasses along a shoreline once strewn with rubble but now covered with a layer of clean white sand.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
The sign proclaiming his little urban yard a "wildlife habitat" became more than a label the day Dirk Geratz found the nest of baby rabbits. He'd hoped for robins and butterflies as he checked off the ground cover, the bird baths and the berry bushes on his certification paperwork and forked over $20 - plus extra for the sign. "I was amazed that a rabbit would want to raise her young right there in a side yard," Geratz said. "I would have thought they would have found it inhospitable.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | August 22, 2012
Weeks after the weird June 29 windstorm that swept the Mid-Atlantic, I can't shake the feeling of being in an episode of "The Twilight Zone," the 1960s TV series that warned of living selfishly. A dash of Rod Serling spiking a large dollop of Catholic guilt. With a mighty crack, a piece of the giant maple that has reigned in my front yard since Abe Lincoln lived in a log cabin nearly crushed my house during the derecho. Meanwhile, the rest of the country looked like it was burning up. In fact, the whole abused planet seems in desperate need of relief.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Another 112 acres of wetlands are being added to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, federal officials announced Wednesday. The Blackwater acquisition for $505,000 is part of more than 6,200 acres of wildlife habitat being preserved at seven refuges nationwide, according to the Department of Interior. The purchases are being paid for with more than $6 million from sales of federal duck hunting stamps. Maryland's Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski hailed the announcement, noting that the refuge is one of Dorchester County's top tourist attractions.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Nearly $2 million in federal grants have been awarded to protect and restore wetlands on the Eastern Shore, including a portion to enhance wildlife habitat on a 950-acre former bird sanctuary whose owner just donated the development rights to the state. The two Maryland projects announced Tuesday by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar were part of $20.5 million in grants handed out in 13 states. Point Pleasant Farm, a former National Audubon Society sanctuary at the mouth of the Choptank River, was selected to receive a $1 million grant.
NEWS
January 12, 2004
AT LEAST five times in the Earth's history, near as scientists can tell, half or more of all plant and animal species were wiped out. They don't know why exactly, but suspect celestial events, such as gamma rays that might have destroyed the Earth's protective atmosphere, exposing all living things below to intense radiation from the sun, followed by a smog-induced ice age. Now, it looks like another mass extinction may be on the horizon - one that...
NEWS
February 10, 2006
Habitat Stewards training scheduled Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks and the National Wildlife Federation will offer Habitat Stewards training next month to volunteers interested in wildlife, ecology, gardening and habitat conservation. The Habitat Stewards will be available to help members of their communities develop and restore wildlife habitat in backyards, schoolyards and other public and private sites. The training will provide familiarity with native plants, local natural history, butterflies and insects, birds, mammals and amphibians.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
When it rains, not only does storm water flow downstream, but so do the banks of small streams emptying into Red Hill Branch, bringing other pollutants with the eroding soil. In a move to stem environmental problems and add wildlife habitat, Howard County has begun four restoration projects for the waterway in Ellicott City. Officials say they expect the work, which includes overhauling a storm-water pond and stabilizing more than 5,000 feet of the banks of three streams, to be completed by May. Project manager Mark Richmond said the pond behind Salterforth Place will go from being a depression that is dry most of the time to a larger pond that always has water.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 1, 2008
When Frank Marsden visited Eden Mill about 17 years ago, he had a glimmer of an idea. He saw something more than a closed-down mill, built in 1805, that was filled with cobwebs and dust. He saw an opportunity to use the land to get people away from their televisions and back into nature. "We have a wonderful environmental education center [the Harford Glen Environmental Education Center] that was established through the school system," said Marsden. "But we didn't have anything for the public.
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