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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Janet S. McKegg, whose career with the Department of Natural Resources spanned nearly three decades, died Friday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Elternhaus, a Dayton assisted-living facility. The former West Friendship resident was 58. The daughter of a tool-and-die inspector and a seamstress, the former Janet Sponaugle was born in Washington County Hospital in Hagerstown. She was raised in Pleasant Valley near Boonsboro. A nature lover since she was a child, she often cared for the baby groundhogs and squirrels that her father had brought home to be raised.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 1997
Three communities have received Wildlife Sanctuary Certification from the Home Builders Association of Maryland (HBAM).RTC Shelter Development at Park View Laurel, Magers Landing and the Villages at Woodbine were recognized for their work to preserve and create wildlife habitats and, in some instances, educating community residents.Shelter Development at Park View Laurel was awarded for its creation of a residential wildlife enhancement program using native landscapes.Landscaping a storm-water pool with aquatic plants, the senior housing community is hoping to attract waterfowl and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Janet S. McKegg, whose career with the Department of Natural Resources spanned nearly three decades, died Friday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Elternhaus, a Dayton assisted-living facility. The former West Friendship resident was 58. The daughter of a tool-and-die inspector and a seamstress, the former Janet Sponaugle was born in Washington County Hospital in Hagerstown. She was raised in Pleasant Valley near Boonsboro. A nature lover since she was a child, she often cared for the baby groundhogs and squirrels that her father had brought home to be raised.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | May 6, 1991
It can be a jungle out there. Sometimes you need a man like William T. Bridgeland, backyard wildlife biologist.On this particular day in upper Baltimore County he is hunting snakes. Big, nasty ones. Maybe even the venomous copperhead the homeowner claims to have spotted.Carefully, Mr. Bridgeland scrutinizes the one-story, wood-frame house on the end of a cul-de-sac in Monkton. He digs up a compost pile, checks lint in the dryer vent, looks up the siding with a mirror. Inside the house, he shines a flashlight in the darker recesses of the basement and attic.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1999
FROM THE time he was 16 years old, Aelred Geis knew what his life's work would be. He made up his mind to become a wildlife biologist.A native of the Chicago area, Geis witnessed substantial development on the outskirts of the city and saw its impact on wildlife.Some 50 years later, after earning a doctorate in wildlife management, teaching at Michigan State University and working for 30 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Geis is still practicing his life's work.In honor of his recent efforts, Howard County Conservancy presented its first Sen. James Clark Jr. Land Stewardship Award to Geis on Tuesday.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer Staff writer Audrey Haar in Ocean City contributed to this article | June 16, 1993
In some editions yesterday, an article about loggerhead turtle eggs failed to say that Irvin Ailes is a wildlife biologist at the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.The Sun regrets the errors.An Ocean City visitor strolling along one of the beach's busiest sections Monday discovered what scientists believe to be a rare nest of Atlantic loggerhead turtle eggs.Yesterday marine biologists delicately removed 21 of the eggs, which resemble small, cream-colored pingpong balls, from the sandy nest and transported them to the less crowded -- and safer -- Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
They work tirelessly to complete their mission at Aberdeen Proving Ground, hauling and building until they complete the job. Not the soldiers, the beavers.Amid 72,000 acres of restricted government land, a growing population of the fur-bearing rodents are hard at work felling trees, building lodges -- and posing a delicate wildlife-management task for officials at the Army ordnance testing center in Harford County.Damming streams to build their distinctive mud-and-twig lodgings, the beavers have been known to disrupt roads and pathways throughout the base.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 4, 1992
Where tanks once rumbled in mock battle, bird watchers will soon stroll.Six months after transferring 8,100 acres at Fort Meade to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Army formally dedicated the land yesterday as "a place where nature can resume its peaceful course."Secretary of the Army Michael Stone passed the final documents marking the transfer to Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan Jr. as members of Maryland's congressional delegation, state officials and park volunteers huddled against the chill.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
Mary Rose Batuure doesn't have to go far to show her 1-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son the wonders of Mother Nature.Almost every night, she says, as many as eight fawns and a doe bed down on and around the brick steps of her colonial home on High Stepper Trail in Sykesville."
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | April 19, 2007
It starts with aerial photos then switches to hip boots on the ground and boats in the water. Little by little, state wildlife biologists are reclaiming the Chesapeake Bay from mute swans. Where two years ago, more than 3,600 of the graceful white birds filled the bay and tributaries, fewer than 1,500 remain. Just as there is no denying the beauty of the swans, there is no denying their destructiveness. The swans eat precious underwater plants that provide sanctuary for fish and crabs and food for wintering waterfowl, such as canvasback ducks.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 14, 2002
FRONT ROYAL, Va. - In Posey Hollow, tucked into the Blue Ridge Mountains, William J. McShea was inspecting a forest primeval - 10 acres of oaks, wild yam vines, seedlings and shrubs that made an ideal home for nesting songbirds and scurrying small mammals. But he had to look through an 8-foot deer fence to see it. Where he stood, the forest was trimmed from eye level to earth as if by an army of obsessive landscapers. Mature trees stood unharmed, but oak seedlings were nipped in the bud. The only things thriving were Japanese barberry and other non-native flora - plants that deer cannot digest.
NEWS
By Scott Harper and Scott Harper,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 19, 2002
PORTSMOUTH, Va. - Wildlife biologists are baffled and intrigued by two incidents captured on videotape at a bald eagle nest in Portsmouth - an eagle parent attacks, kills, then eats its two scrawny young. "We've never seen anything like this," said Bryan Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the College of William and Mary, which was monitoring the nest with a 24-hour camera. Watts and colleague Mitchell Byrd, a renowned eagle expert in Virginia, contacted other scientists after viewing the footage and found that cannibalism among the nation's signature bird has never been documented or even suspected.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1999
FROM THE time he was 16 years old, Aelred Geis knew what his life's work would be. He made up his mind to become a wildlife biologist.A native of the Chicago area, Geis witnessed substantial development on the outskirts of the city and saw its impact on wildlife.Some 50 years later, after earning a doctorate in wildlife management, teaching at Michigan State University and working for 30 years with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Geis is still practicing his life's work.In honor of his recent efforts, Howard County Conservancy presented its first Sen. James Clark Jr. Land Stewardship Award to Geis on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1997
Three communities have received Wildlife Sanctuary Certification from the Home Builders Association of Maryland (HBAM).RTC Shelter Development at Park View Laurel, Magers Landing and the Villages at Woodbine were recognized for their work to preserve and create wildlife habitats and, in some instances, educating community residents.Shelter Development at Park View Laurel was awarded for its creation of a residential wildlife enhancement program using native landscapes.Landscaping a storm-water pool with aquatic plants, the senior housing community is hoping to attract waterfowl and other wildlife.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 14, 2002
FRONT ROYAL, Va. - In Posey Hollow, tucked into the Blue Ridge Mountains, William J. McShea was inspecting a forest primeval - 10 acres of oaks, wild yam vines, seedlings and shrubs that made an ideal home for nesting songbirds and scurrying small mammals. But he had to look through an 8-foot deer fence to see it. Where he stood, the forest was trimmed from eye level to earth as if by an army of obsessive landscapers. Mature trees stood unharmed, but oak seedlings were nipped in the bud. The only things thriving were Japanese barberry and other non-native flora - plants that deer cannot digest.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
They work tirelessly to complete their mission at Aberdeen Proving Ground, hauling and building until they complete the job. Not the soldiers, the beavers.Amid 72,000 acres of restricted government land, a growing population of the fur-bearing rodents are hard at work felling trees, building lodges -- and posing a delicate wildlife-management task for officials at the Army ordnance testing center in Harford County.Damming streams to build their distinctive mud-and-twig lodgings, the beavers have been known to disrupt roads and pathways throughout the base.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
Mary Rose Batuure doesn't have to go far to show her 1-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son the wonders of Mother Nature.Almost every night, she says, as many as eight fawns and a doe bed down on and around the brick steps of her colonial home on High Stepper Trail in Sykesville."
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