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June 1, 2011
Editor: I just wanted to send you this e-mail to let you know of a newsworthy event that took place over the weekend. I frequently go to Bynum Run Park as my son enjoys visiting the ducks and geese there. We were there Saturday evening (May 21) and we noticed that someone had abandoned four small (possibly a month old) Pekin ducks. We knew that they had been left there as we go to this park frequently and they had never been there before. We also could tell because they came right to us and they appeared scared by the other geese and appeared to be scared of their new surroundings.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
On a low-humidity puffy-cloud summer day, 8-year-old Zach Green of Gaithersburg rode a bicycle along the 5-mile Wildlife Drive in the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge with his mother, Becky Green, and his grandmother, Andrea Adler, who lives in Bethesda. The three stopped at the first observation site along the drive, propped their bikes on kickstands and began walking up a short boardwalk to the spot where two sets of binoculars were available for searching the marshy grasses and slow-moving Blackwater River.
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NEWS
March 15, 2009
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold the second in a series of planning meetings for the Patuxent Research Refuge to help develop a plan for improvements in transportation for the refuge. Comments from members of the community are being sought to help with planning. The meeting will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, near Laurel. brad_knudsen@fws.gov. Youth corps The Patuxent Research Refuge will be host to a Youth Conservation Corps program this summer.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Heading into town from the west on U.S. 40, drivers take a bridge across the Susquehanna River and cut through treetops reaching up from another world below the rumbling road. It's green down there on Garrett Island, and busy with the activity of many creatures, if not people. People have been pinning their aspirations on Garrett Island since the 1600s, when one Englishman talked about building a college there. But lately, these 198 acres are reserved chiefly for plants, trees and nonhuman actors.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
The Intercounty Connector isn't finished yet, but already the new six-lane highway across the Washington suburbs is drawing traffic — beneath it. Deer hoofprints and tracks of raccoons and other small animals traverse the soft dirt floor of an oversized stream culvert under an almost completed stretch of highway near here. It's one of 10 wildlife crossings being installed along the 18-mile, $2 billion transportation project. Crews are still putting the finishing touches on the western half of the ICC, which is to open in early 2011, weather permitting.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
What group has 77 million members and spent $104 billion on its activities last year?According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, that 40-some percent of the U.S. population consists of people 16 and older who participate in recreational activities relating to fish and other wildlife.In the preliminary findings of the 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, the USFWS says more than 39 million people fished and hunted in 1996. On average, each sportsman spent $1,828 last year on food, lodging, transportation, gear, land leases, licenses, group memberships and user fees.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 11, 1991
MADISON -- A covert action network is spreading across Maryland.One of its key operatives, Richard D. Abend, quietly executes the network's designs at his 106-acre Dorchester County tree farm here, under cover of horned owls and wood ducks, bald eagles and great blue herons and, above all, mosquitoes.Sinister? Not unless the sight of wildlife in Maryland forests spoils your day.For Mr. Abend defines "covert" thus: "a thicket that provides habitat for wildlife."And he and 29 fellow "coverts cooperators" across Maryland are trying to spread the word that the state's 2.7 million acres of wood lands can benefit landowners and wildlife alike.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
With sunlight streaming down on their backs, the two ducks appear so lifelike they could waddle off the easel.But wildlife artist Louis F.X. Frisino isn't done with them. He puts his glasses on, dunks a thin brush in a glass jug, swishes the wet bristles in white watercolor on the palette. He wipes excess paint off on a rag, and then feathers the tiniest line on one of the ducks. He scrutinizes the waterfowl and delicately lays on another white slit. It's as if he is painting these ducks feather by feather.
NEWS
By Chris Palmer | September 19, 2006
The tragic death of "Crocodile Hunter" Steve Irwin, from a stingray's defensive attack, underscores a problem with many wildlife films and television programs: They send the wrong message about wildlife, people and the relationships between them. Mr. Irwin's fate reminded me of the gruesome deaths three years ago of amateur filmmaker Timothy Treadwell and his girlfriend, Amie Huguenard, who were consumed by grizzly bears in Alaska's Katmai National Park. Mr. Treadwell's death quickly gained notoriety and horrified the public, and was the subject of the 2005 documentary Grizzly Man. But it was no surprise to those of us who knew him; for years he had treated bears as pets, singing to and even touching them.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer Staff writers Ellie Baublitz, David Michael Ettlin and Bruce Reid contributed to this article | June 30, 1992
A bewildered black bear that bounded about the Baltimore Beltway was bagged yesterday.But only barely.It took two tranquilizer darts delivered by a state wildlife worker to bring down the 80-pound bear, believed to be 2 years old.Since Friday, the bear had been sighted repeatedly in the Baltimore suburbs, first in the Sykesville area of Carroll County and then along the Baltimore County-Howard County border. Officials finally caught up with it at the median between the Beltway and Interstate 70 around midday.
NEWS
September 26, 2013
Run for the Refuge and help raise funds for its research and education missions, Sunday, Sept. 29, starting at 9 a.m., at the North Tract entrance, off Route 198. Turn at Bald Eagle Drive and travel 1 mile to the Visitor Contact Station. This special 5K fundraising race is sponsored by Friends of Patuxent and benefits the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and Refuge. To register, go to runfortherefuge.com or Friends of Patuxent on Facebook.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Masonville Cove , a reclaimed stretch of South Baltimore's industrial waterfront, has earned a new distinction -- the nation's first "urban wildlife refuge partnership. " U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to announce the designation Thursday morning at the 11-acre nature area that's been developed by the Maryland Port Administration in a formerly abandoned and contaminated stretch of Baltimore's harbor. It's not a federal takeover, but the beginning of a new cooperative effort by the wildlife service to instill conservation values in urban residents, especially youth.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
After a four-year search for the perfect piece of waterfront property on which to build their dream home, Mike and Lana Condon hit the jackpot in November 2011. A little cottage, bearing the water damage of countless summer storms and winter winds, sat on 1 acre on the banks of the Middle River in the eastern Baltimore County neighborhood of Bowleys Quarters. The Condons purchased the double lot -- with old trees providing shade on the street side of the property and a sweeping plain of open lawn to the original bulkhead and pier on the river -- for $362,500.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Join a naturalist on a Tree Walk, Sunday, Aug. 4 from 10 to 11 a.m. at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, 10901 Scarlet Tanager Loop, located off Powder Mill Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 197. All ages can discover how to identify local trees by leaf, bark and flower in this informative half-mile hike. Registration is required. Call 301-497-5887 for reservation. Donations to the Friends of Patuxent are appreciated.
NEWS
May 7, 2013
I was absolutely appalled at reading that the dear baby fox who was rescued by concerned firefighters was euthanized for fear of rabies ("Rescued fox pup put down for fear of rabies," May 5). This baby fox was given a second chance at life when it was rescued and was even newsworthy enough to appear on local TV stations. When the public saw this, I know in my heart that all they could feel was happiness for this dear creature. What is the purpose of wildlife rescue sanctuaries? I donate money each year to these organizations who are run by volunteers and veterinarians who donate their time.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
In response to the letter, "Cats: Natural-born killers" (March 9), so are humans. When I moved into my house in Havre de Grace 18 years ago, there was an abandoned house behind our property and there still is. There were also 19 feral cats. There were squirrels, opossum, raccoons and birds. The cats were being fed by neighbors who thought they were doing the right thing. Still, in a few years the feral cat population dwindled to 15, then ten, then about five and now there are three. They died from feline leukemia mostly and cars secondly.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1991
NO MATTER what his surrogate mother wants, Gizmo, a 2-year-old Rhesus monkey, has established his own routine.''I could run a clock by him,'' says Colleen Layton, who adopted the monkey when he was 3 weeks old.''At 10 every evening, he notifies me that 'we' are going to bed by turning off the TV, even though he loves it, and the lights. If I'm writing he takes my pen.''I comply. I clean him up, change his diaper -- he won't wear one that is soiled -- and I get his bottle of Similac.''After a good burp he grabs his teddy bear and we go to bed and he snuggles up. In the morning we have a cereal breakfast and he gets a children's Flintstone vitamin.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 4, 1990
Easton should be a popular spot next weekend, with wildlife devotees flocking to town in large numbers for the annual Waterfowl Festival, which celebrates its 20th anniversary from Friday to Sunday.The festival is a showcase for renowned waterfowl painters, carvers and photographers. Last year's festival drew over 500 exhibitors. Their work ranged in price from $40 prints to $40,000 carvings. Waterfowl paintings exhibited for sale in the Tidewater Inn's Gold Room go for $700 or as much as $5,000.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
Predation by free-roaming cats is a serious matter, and it deserves our careful attention ("House cats: the destructive invasive species purring on your lap," Feb. 25). The Humane Society of the United States values both cats and wildlife. Yet it is unrealistic and inhumane to simply gather up some 30 to 80 million unowned cats and remove them from the outdoors, as op-ed writer George Fenwick suggests. Adoption is not feasible for truly feral cats. Permanent sanctuary for that many cats would require inordinate resources.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
Commentator Ron Lambert claims that the threat to wildlife presented by cats is based on unscientific methodologies ("Cats can be managed in a way that protects birds," March 2). Contrary to his assertion, a review of scientific literature published in January concluded that cats in the U.S. killed as many as 3.7 billion birds and 17 billion mammals every year, and that free-roaming cats may constitute the single greatest man-made cause of wildlife mortality. Several recent studies show that trap-neuter-release colonies do not lower cat populations.
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