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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 31, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- For the sake of a patch of grass, an acre and a half of trees fell, a private foundation lost $72,000 and a planned $5.3 million museum was moved.The future Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art had to be relocated 80 feet from its original proposed site in Salisbury after state officials discovered a rare plant on the property, representatives of the Ward Foundation told members of the state Board of Public Works yesterday.Paying an architect to redesign the museum so that even the building's shadow would not fall on the 4-foot by 10-foot plot cost the private, non-profit foundation about $72,000, said Ralph A. Bufano, the foundation's executive director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Seitz and Melanie Seitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2004
Two shiny black eyes peek through the opening of the green plants. Those eyes belong to beaver Buddha, one of the residents of the Salisbury Zoo (755 South Drive, 410-548-3188 or www.salisburyzoo.org). Curious, he moves slowly to get a better look at whom he is greeting. He climbs carefully up the fence of his cage. In the process, Buddha exposes his significantly large and furry belly. He received his name from the woman who raised him in her bathtub. Now he seems happy to have a more natural environment to satisfy his curiosity.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
SALISBURY -- The way an architect designed it, the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art resembles a bird flying over the low shoreline of Schumaker Pond here.But 1 1/2 years after the $5.3 million museum opened to the public, chronic financial woes -- exacerbated by conflicts between the museum's professional staff and its volunteer governing group -- threaten to clip the bird's wings.When trustees forced Vaughn Baker's resignation early this month, he became the third executive director to leave the museum since it opened in July 1992.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
The Board of Public Works gave Salisbury State University the green light yesterday to take over the Ward Museum, a financially troubled Eastern Shore tourist attraction known for its collection of decoys and other wildfowl art. Under the agreement, Salisbury State will pay the Ward Foundation $1 and assume the museum's $1.6 million in debt so that it can take control of the 25-year-old institution. The university will acquire the Salisbury waterfront museum and its 4.2 acres of grounds, valued at $4.7 million, along with an art collection valued at $4 million.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
The Board of Public Works gave Salisbury State University the green light yesterday to take over the Ward Museum, a financially troubled Eastern Shore tourist attraction known for its collection of decoys and other wildfowl art. Under the agreement, Salisbury State will pay the Ward Foundation $1 and assume the museum's $1.6 million in debt so that it can take control of the 25-year-old institution. The university will acquire the Salisbury waterfront museum and its 4.2 acres of grounds, valued at $4.7 million, along with an art collection valued at $4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Melanie Seitz and Melanie Seitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2004
Two shiny black eyes peek through the opening of the green plants. Those eyes belong to beaver Buddha, one of the residents of the Salisbury Zoo (755 South Drive, 410-548-3188 or www.salisburyzoo.org). Curious, he moves slowly to get a better look at whom he is greeting. He climbs carefully up the fence of his cage. In the process, Buddha exposes his significantly large and furry belly. He received his name from the woman who raised him in her bathtub. Now he seems happy to have a more natural environment to satisfy his curiosity.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2000
SALISBURY -- In a move aimed at boosting the cash-strapped Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury State University officials announced a deal yesterday they say will enhance the university's growing role as the cultural center of the Eastern Shore. The museum, which houses perhaps the world's finest collection of wildfowl art, will donate its assets, worth an estimated $8.5 million, to the university. In exchange, the university will make payments on the museum's $1.6 million debt, which has limited the collection of historical decoys, wildfowl art and carvings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 23, 1998
Shore art"Painters of the Eastern Shore," a display of more than 60 works of regional art, and six generations of one family's art from the Parsons andHanks collection will be shown tomorrow through Sept. 20 at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art in Salisbury. The public can meet artists featured in both exhibits at a reception tomorrow from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art is at 909 S. Schumaker Drive in Salisbury. Museum hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
The state has saved a rare aquatic plant from having a $5.4 million wildfowl art museum built on top of it in Salisbury -- at the not insignificant cost of $70,000. We appreciate the Department of Natural Resources' dedication to environmental preservation, but the price in this case is too high.At stake was a single strand of Robbins' Spikerush, one of 618 species of plants and animals protected by Maryland law. It sits in Schumaker Pond, over which part of the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art was to be built.
NEWS
March 4, 1991
Ward MuseumEditor: I would like to respond to two recent letters indicating an apparent misconception concerning the funding of the new Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art.This unique art museum is being constructed by the Ward Foundation and dedicated to the perpetuation of wildfowl art.The Ward Foundation is a private, non-profit organization funded more than 20 years ago to preserve the American art form of decoy carving.Due to the phenomenal growth of the foundation and steadily increasing interest in wildfowl art, the foundation's volunteer board of trustees committed to building the new museum.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2000
SALISBURY -- In a move aimed at boosting the cash-strapped Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury State University officials announced a deal yesterday they say will enhance the university's growing role as the cultural center of the Eastern Shore. The museum, which houses perhaps the world's finest collection of wildfowl art, will donate its assets, worth an estimated $8.5 million, to the university. In exchange, the university will make payments on the museum's $1.6 million debt, which has limited the collection of historical decoys, wildfowl art and carvings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randi Kest | July 23, 1998
Shore art"Painters of the Eastern Shore," a display of more than 60 works of regional art, and six generations of one family's art from the Parsons andHanks collection will be shown tomorrow through Sept. 20 at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art in Salisbury. The public can meet artists featured in both exhibits at a reception tomorrow from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.The Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art is at 909 S. Schumaker Drive in Salisbury. Museum hours are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers.
FEATURES
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | May 8, 1994
Baltimore is a city that thinks like a small town.I like it that way.Everything I need is in Baltimore: a great library, some peaceful bars and plenty of neighborhood ethnic restaurants. There are parks and boats and people everywhere.Like many visitors from outside Maryland, I have seen the National Aquarium, walked about in Fells Point, shopped at the Gallery at Harborplace.But to get the complete picture of Maryland, residents as well as out-of-state visitors should see a bush sculpted like a teacup, walk along a Civil War battlefield, try to retrieve a space satellite and taste one of the area's best barbecue sandwiches.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | January 16, 1994
SALISBURY -- The way an architect designed it, the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art resembles a bird flying over the low shoreline of Schumaker Pond here.But 1 1/2 years after the $5.3 million museum opened to the public, chronic financial woes -- exacerbated by conflicts between the museum's professional staff and its volunteer governing group -- threaten to clip the bird's wings.When trustees forced Vaughn Baker's resignation early this month, he became the third executive director to leave the museum since it opened in July 1992.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
SALISBURY -- No real duck ever coveted a decoy this much.A rare mallard drake carved and painted by renowned Chincoteague decoy maker Ira Hudson -- who most likely sold the bird for a couple of dollars when he made it 60 years ago -- fetched $25,300 yesterday at an auction to benefit Salisbury's Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art.The previous evening, during a surprisingly brisk bidding war for old duck and goose calls, a wooden call made by an Illinois carver around...
NEWS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
Gone are the days when Ocean City emptied out after Labor Day, and vacationers didn't return until Memorial Day rolled around again.Now Ocean City stays busy in the fall, as more people discover the serenity and crisp, sunny days of autumn by the sea. While the surfers and boogie boarders don their wet suits and embrace the chilly waves, there are alternative activities for those who prefer to stay warm and dry. With so many shows, fairs and races going...
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | October 21, 1990
Museum of Wildfowl Art is getting a new homeGround was broken earlier this month for the new Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art in Salisbury.Plans call for construction of the $3.1 million building -- which will include a museum wing, education center and administrative offices -- to be completed next October, according to public information coordinator Donna Stalder. The museum's initial exhibitions will be open to the public in January 1992, she said, to be followed by a planned second stage of construction that will include a multipurpose room, library and dining area on a 4.2 acre wooded waterfront site.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
SALISBURY -- No real duck ever coveted a decoy this much.A rare mallard drake carved and painted by renowned Chincoteague decoy maker Ira Hudson -- who most likely sold the bird for a couple of dollars when he made it 60 years ago -- fetched $25,300 yesterday at an auction to benefit Salisbury's Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art.The previous evening, during a surprisingly brisk bidding war for old duck and goose calls, a wooden call made by an Illinois carver around...
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 31, 1991
Maryland Citizens for the Arts will hold a salute to Gov. William Donald Schaefer and leaders of the General Assembly May 20 at Center Stage in acknowledgment of their support of state arts funding.Last year, the General Assembly approved a $2.4 million increase in funding for the Maryland State Arts Council. This year, despite the state's financial woes, the governor cut just $125,000 in program funds from the arts council's $7.4 million budget and the House and Senate cut only an additional $200,000 from that.
NEWS
March 21, 1991
Brass SignEditor: I think our state legislators are completely gutless when it comes to raising taxes -- or else they are underestimating their constituents. I would pass the Linowes commission tax proposal in its entirety or else raise the sales tax to six percent, which will accomplish the same end. I believe that people will pay more taxes for value received.I realize Gov. William Donald Schaefer has his flaws, but there is no doubt in my mind that he has the best interest of this state in mind at all times.
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