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By Scott Dance | March 29, 2012
It's gusty out there, and with low moisture in the air, that means a risk of wildfires. The National Weather Service is forecasting 10 to 20 mph winds with gusts up to 30 mph. At the Sun weather station dowtown, gusts have been reaching 20 mph throughout the morning. Dew points have dropped to the mid-30s. With low humidity, dry brush and gusty winds, there is an "enhanced threat" for wildfires, the weather service cautions in a hazardous weather outlook. Speaking of the wind, here's an interesting look at it shared with me by a tweeter at last night's Sun Tweetup at Bond Street Social in Fells Point.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Sunshine and highs in the mid-60s are forecast Thursday, with breezy and dry conditions. A red flag warning, indicating an enhanced threat of wildfire spread, is in effect from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Breezes of 15-25 mph are expected, and with sunny skies and dry plants, any brush fires could easily grow, forecasters warned. A brisk morning with lows around 40 and wind chills in the upper 30s was expected, but temperatures are forecast to rise quickly after sunrise. Clouds are expected to begin moving in overnight, with lows around 50 degrees, before a chance for showers Friday.
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NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | October 28, 2007
The blogosphere behaves most like a wildfire, especially when covering one. In some ways, the California disaster was a tragedy made for blogs - a round-the-clock event that demanded real-time information for millions of people across hundreds of square miles. And in numerous ways, blogs came through. Online bulletin boards such as Greaterorange.blogspot.com and t-cep.org, the blog of the Topanga Coalition for Emergency Preparedness, formed after the 1993 Mailbu wildfires, updated evacuation news.
NEWS
By Mike Specian | December 15, 2013
Former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens once famously stated that the Internet is a "series of tubes," an observation that would have been more comical if his committee hadn't been responsible for regulating the Internet. Rep. Michele Bachmann suggested that the HPV vaccine causes mental retardation based on the unassailable evidence that a woman at a presidential debate told her so. And their legislative colleague Rep. Todd Akin - while serving on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee - defended a ban on abortion based partially on the belief that women who are raped can shut down their pregnancies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1998
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Faced with more long-range drought conditions in Florida, state officials are seeking $35 million for an aggressive controlled-burning program to prevent a repetition of last summer's fires, which destroyed more than 500,000 acres.The state Agriculture Department, criticized by agriculture groups and timber landowners for not being aggressive enough in using controlled burning before last summer's fires, said it planned to burn considerably more than the 2 million acres of public and private land that were burned in 1998.
NEWS
By Bennett Ramberg | August 30, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- What do Iraq and wildfires have in common? As it turns out, quite a bit. Here in the West, major brush and timber blazes are an annual occurrence this time of year. As a metaphor, they can help us to better understand the literal and figurative flames engulfing Iraq. Iraq - like so many countries that suffered political collapse in recent decades - must first "burn itself out" before rebirth can begin. In the interim, try as it might, the United States cannot extinguish the firestorm it unleashed in 2003.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- As Californians sift through the cinders of last week's wildfires, there is a growing consensus that the state's war against such disasters - as it is currently being fought - cannot be won. "California has lost 1.5 million acres in the last four years," said Richard A. Minnich, a professor of earth sciences who teaches fire ecology at the University of California, Riverside. "When do we declare the policy a failure?" Fire-management experts such as Minnich, who has compared fire histories in San Diego County and Baja California in Mexico, say the message is clear: Mexico has smaller fires that burn out naturally, regularly clearing out combustible underbrush and causing relatively little destruction because the cycle is still natural.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Rising temperatures and earlier melting of snowpacks have sharply increased the number of Western wildfires - and scientists say to expect more of the same if the trend persists. Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the University of Arizona examined 34 years of forest fire reports in 11 Western states and found the number of fires increased in size and severity since 1987, the same year that spring and summer temperatures began to rise. "It's a very good snapshot of what's been happening in the Western forests over the past three decades," said Anthony Westerling, the lead author and a fire climatologist at the University of California, Merced.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 2006
WEWOKA, Okla. -- The wind-whipped flames were upon them before they knew it, Margo Weger recalled, and the cattle disappeared behind plumes of smoke that parted to reveal a terrifying sight. "Larry!" she remembers screaming to her husband, "the cows are burning!" Nine days after a wildfire scorched their ranch here in east-central Oklahoma, the Wegers, like others in the drought-stricken region, are reliving narrow escapes and counting their blessings. They were spared, as were their 75 head of cattle.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Officials declared the California wildfires tamed yesterday, 10 days after the blazes began their destructive rampage across a wide swath of Southern California. "Finally, we're able to say that as of 6 p.m. tonight or 8 a.m. tomorrow, all the fires will be 100 percent contained," Andrea Tuttle, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, said yesterday. State and federal officials were still surveying the damage from the state's worst wildfires, which killed 20 people, leveled 3,500 homes and blackened an area of 743,621 acres, nearly the size of Rhode Island.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
The National Weather Service has issued a fire weather watch across Central Maryland for Wednesday, warning of a risk of wildfire spread. With relative humidity down around 25 percent, gusty winds up to 30 mph and dry brush and twigs, the advisory is in effect from Wednesday morning through Wednesday evening. "OPEN BURNING OF ANY TYPE IS CONSIDERED VERY HAZARDOUS THIS TIME OF  YEAR," an earlier special statement cautioned. "ACCIDENTAL ESCAPED DEBRIS BURNS ARE THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF  WILDFIRES.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
I travel from Linthicum to College Park via the Baltimore-Washington Parkway every weekday between the hours of 5:20 a.m. to 5:45 a.m. to catch a metro train to my office in Washington. Daily, I see motorists toss lit cigarettes out of their moving vehicles at least once if not more often. On one recent morning, I observed at least four such incidents. Nothing incites my hidden road rage tendencies more than a careless motorist flipping a lit cigarette out of their vehicle window onto the road.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 29, 2012
It's gusty out there, and with low moisture in the air, that means a risk of wildfires. The National Weather Service is forecasting 10 to 20 mph winds with gusts up to 30 mph. At the Sun weather station dowtown, gusts have been reaching 20 mph throughout the morning. Dew points have dropped to the mid-30s. With low humidity, dry brush and gusty winds, there is an "enhanced threat" for wildfires, the weather service cautions in a hazardous weather outlook. Speaking of the wind, here's an interesting look at it shared with me by a tweeter at last night's Sun Tweetup at Bond Street Social in Fells Point.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | May 16, 2008
Douglas Alan Parker, a Howard County entrepreneur whose eSchoolnewsletter , an e-mail communication link, connected schools with the homes of their students, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at Four Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Woodbine resident was 49. The genesis of Mr. Parker's e-mail system came about in 2002 during the height of the sniper attacks in the Washington area, when worried parents were trying to call schools whose phones were constantly busy. "We couldn't get to principals to find out what was going on," Mr. Parker, the father of four, told The Sun in a 2007 interview.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 28, 2007
SAN DIEGO -- As Californians sift through the cinders of last week's wildfires, there is a growing consensus that the state's war against such disasters - as it is currently being fought - cannot be won. "California has lost 1.5 million acres in the last four years," said Richard A. Minnich, a professor of earth sciences who teaches fire ecology at the University of California, Riverside. "When do we declare the policy a failure?" Fire-management experts such as Minnich, who has compared fire histories in San Diego County and Baja California in Mexico, say the message is clear: Mexico has smaller fires that burn out naturally, regularly clearing out combustible underbrush and causing relatively little destruction because the cycle is still natural.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | October 28, 2007
The blogosphere behaves most like a wildfire, especially when covering one. In some ways, the California disaster was a tragedy made for blogs - a round-the-clock event that demanded real-time information for millions of people across hundreds of square miles. And in numerous ways, blogs came through. Online bulletin boards such as Greaterorange.blogspot.com and t-cep.org, the blog of the Topanga Coalition for Emergency Preparedness, formed after the 1993 Mailbu wildfires, updated evacuation news.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2003
SAN DIEGO - Fires happen all the time, and what's left behind is never pretty. But seldom is the devastation as complete as it is here in Scripps Ranch, a middle-class community in the suburbs north of San Diego. A few days ago, the corner of Fairbrook Road and Thornbush Court looked like most neighborhoods in America, with Halloween decorations on the doors, minivans in the driveways and kids in the back yard. Look in any direction from the street corner today and little is left except for brick chimneys that stand like eerie sentinels over a charcoal landscape.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
FORT COLLINS, Colo. - From his seat in the instrument-crammed cockpit, Dutch Snyder dips a bright-yellow wing and sizes up the billowing smoke on the forested ridge ahead. With his left hand, he makes minor adjustments to a computer before beginning his attack. Satisfied, he pushes the control stick forward, drops to treetop level and punches a button beneath his right thumb. Instantly, a red plume of chemical retardant is released from the belly of the single-engine plane and falls to earth, cutting off the wildfire's path and buying time for ground crews hiking into the backcountry.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 25, 2007
From dramatic cell phone camera images of flames as they choked off neighborhood escape routes to chilling online narratives of evacuation, citizen journalists covering the wildfires in California this week gave new meaning to the concept of reporting a natural disaster from the ground up. "I'm not knocking what we do in the mainstream media, but citizens are bringing the highly personal, close-up nature of these fires home to viewers in a way that traditional...
NEWS
By Bettina Boxall and Julie Cart and Bettina Boxall and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2007
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. -- No one could claim surprise last week when tall flames raged across more than 3,000 acres and consumed 254 homes. The ingredients for a devastating wildfire have long been in place in the Tahoe basin, where 32,000 houses are tucked into an overgrown forest of pine and fir. Three million visitors a year come to relax on the shores of one of the deepest and clearest lakes in the world. Investigators said the blaze was started by an illegal campfire. It was mostly contained, and some firefighters were beginning to withdraw, they said.
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