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Wild Wild West

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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 1999
Will Smith has become something of a Fourth of July tradition, what with the smashing success of "Independence Day" and "Men In Black," both of which were released during the holiday weekend. Will he manage to do it again with "Wild Wild West"? As far as audiences are concerned, he probably will, even though this Western-science-fiction-adventure comedy can't match the wit and imagination of "Men in Black" or the sheer bombast of "Independence Day." At times incoherent, with long, dull stretches, "Wild Wild West" doesn't exactly jump off the screen.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
A man was fatally shot and a woman injured after a Christmas Eve shooting in an East Baltimore housing project.  The shooting occurred at about 11:30 a.m. in the 1100 block of Webb Court, near the Institute of Notre Dame in Latrobe Courts. Police said the male victim was shot multiple times and taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died, and a woman walked into the hospital with a gunshot wound to her stomach.  At the scene, the male victim's clothing was scattered on an embankment in front of a residence.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
A man was fatally shot and a woman injured after a Christmas Eve shooting in an East Baltimore housing project.  The shooting occurred at about 11:30 a.m. in the 1100 block of Webb Court, near the Institute of Notre Dame in Latrobe Courts. Police said the male victim was shot multiple times and taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died, and a woman walked into the hospital with a gunshot wound to her stomach.  At the scene, the male victim's clothing was scattered on an embankment in front of a residence.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | July 7, 1999
After Barry Sonnenfeld read the script for the movie "Wild Wild West," he told Warner Bros. he was interested in directing the movie. But he had one condition, and it was non-negotiable.He wanted Will Smith, with whom he collaborated on the monster hit "Men in Black," to play the role of government agent Jim West.Someone at Warner Bros. pointed out that Smith was black and that Robert Conrad, who played West on the original TV series upon which the movie was based, was white. Or, as Sonnenfeld describes him, "very white."
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | July 7, 1999
After Barry Sonnenfeld read the script for the movie "Wild Wild West," he told Warner Bros. he was interested in directing the movie. But he had one condition, and it was non-negotiable.He wanted Will Smith, with whom he collaborated on the monster hit "Men in Black," to play the role of government agent Jim West.Someone at Warner Bros. pointed out that Smith was black and that Robert Conrad, who played West on the original TV series upon which the movie was based, was white. Or, as Sonnenfeld describes him, "very white."
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | March 10, 1991
You'll be pleased to learn that I have thought up yet another way to revive our nation's sagging economy by making myself rich.To understand my concept, you need to be aware of an important fashion trend sweeping the entire nation (defined as "parts of New York and San Francisco"). Under this trend, sophisticated urban people, seeking leisure wear, are purchasing used, beat-up, worn, ripped, raggedy cowboy garments that were previously owned by actual cowboys. People are actually paying more for damaged cowboy jeans than for new ones.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 2, 1998
Remember "The Wild, Wild West"? It was one of the coolest television shows of the 1960s. Now Warner Bros. is turning it into a movie, starring Will Smith - can we call him "Baltimore's own" yet? - as James T. West, Kevin Kline as Artemus Gordon, Kenneth Branagh as the diabolical Dr. Loveless, and William Mason as the train.Make that the William Mason, Baltimore's own.Until last week, the classic mid-19th-century steam engine had been sitting in the B&O Railroad Museum. Now it's out of the big house for service to Warner Bros.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 14, 1991
The plot has thickened in the wild, wild American League West, where no fewer than five teams are fighting for the rail as the 1991 season passes the halfway mark.The other division races appear to be shaking themselves out. The Toronto Blue Jays are threatening to make short work of the AL East; the Los Angeles Dodgers are in control in the NL West; and the NL East has become a two-team race. But in the West, only 2 1/2 games separated first place and fifth at the All-Star break. Even the sixth-place Seattle Mariners and the last-place Kansas City Royals are too close for any kind of comfort.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1999
William Mason, Baltimore's latest reigning film star, is a lively 143-year-old that has eight wheels and tips the scales at 105,000 pounds. When the William Mason (no relation to James Mason), gets steamed up about something, it's usually at 76 pounds per square inch.And one more thing: the William Mason is really a she: a classic American-Type locomotive that measures 48 feet from the tip of her cow catcher to the coupler on her tender. She's just returned to Baltimore from a yearlong adventure that, along the way, included a $125,000 rebuild at Pennsylvania's Strasburg Railroad shops.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
It was Joe Brocato's first night on the job. All was peaceful. His mind said it was time to catch a few nods. His body refused to go along. Sleep just wasn't going to happen."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 30, 1999
Will Smith has become something of a Fourth of July tradition, what with the smashing success of "Independence Day" and "Men In Black," both of which were released during the holiday weekend. Will he manage to do it again with "Wild Wild West"? As far as audiences are concerned, he probably will, even though this Western-science-fiction-adventure comedy can't match the wit and imagination of "Men in Black" or the sheer bombast of "Independence Day." At times incoherent, with long, dull stretches, "Wild Wild West" doesn't exactly jump off the screen.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1999
William Mason, Baltimore's latest reigning film star, is a lively 143-year-old that has eight wheels and tips the scales at 105,000 pounds. When the William Mason (no relation to James Mason), gets steamed up about something, it's usually at 76 pounds per square inch.And one more thing: the William Mason is really a she: a classic American-Type locomotive that measures 48 feet from the tip of her cow catcher to the coupler on her tender. She's just returned to Baltimore from a yearlong adventure that, along the way, included a $125,000 rebuild at Pennsylvania's Strasburg Railroad shops.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 2, 1998
Remember "The Wild, Wild West"? It was one of the coolest television shows of the 1960s. Now Warner Bros. is turning it into a movie, starring Will Smith - can we call him "Baltimore's own" yet? - as James T. West, Kevin Kline as Artemus Gordon, Kenneth Branagh as the diabolical Dr. Loveless, and William Mason as the train.Make that the William Mason, Baltimore's own.Until last week, the classic mid-19th-century steam engine had been sitting in the B&O Railroad Museum. Now it's out of the big house for service to Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
It was Joe Brocato's first night on the job. All was peaceful. His mind said it was time to catch a few nods. His body refused to go along. Sleep just wasn't going to happen."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 14, 1991
The plot has thickened in the wild, wild American League West, where no fewer than five teams are fighting for the rail as the 1991 season passes the halfway mark.The other division races appear to be shaking themselves out. The Toronto Blue Jays are threatening to make short work of the AL East; the Los Angeles Dodgers are in control in the NL West; and the NL East has become a two-team race. But in the West, only 2 1/2 games separated first place and fifth at the All-Star break. Even the sixth-place Seattle Mariners and the last-place Kansas City Royals are too close for any kind of comfort.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | March 10, 1991
You'll be pleased to learn that I have thought up yet another way to revive our nation's sagging economy by making myself rich.To understand my concept, you need to be aware of an important fashion trend sweeping the entire nation (defined as "parts of New York and San Francisco"). Under this trend, sophisticated urban people, seeking leisure wear, are purchasing used, beat-up, worn, ripped, raggedy cowboy garments that were previously owned by actual cowboys. People are actually paying more for damaged cowboy jeans than for new ones.
NEWS
November 10, 1993
Charles Aidman, a TV actor who ap- peared in one of the first "Twilight Zone" episodes and narrated an updated version of the science fiction series, died of cancer Sunday in Beverly Hills, Calif. The 68-year-old actor appeared in "The Fugitive," "Gunsmoke," "The Wild, Wild West," "Little House on the Prairie" and "Quincy, M.E."
SPORTS
April 16, 2009
1 Opening: in New York: The Yankees play their first regular-season game in their new ballpark (12:30 p.m., MLB), and Bob Costas will be on hand to wax elegiac. 2 Get the signal?: The PGA Tour's Verizon Heritage event (3 p.m., Golf) is quite distracting with that guy walking the course asking, "Can you hear me now?" 3 Wild, wild West: Versus carries three games from the NHL Western Conference playoffs, starting at 7 p.m. 4 Speedy night: Up late? The Speed channel has coverage of practice for Formula One's Chinese Grand Prix at 2 a.m. But an hour later, they feel like driving again.
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