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NEWS
January 14, 2005
The Patuxent Research Refuge, the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF), Wheelin' Sportsmen and Meade Natural Heritage Association will offer a spring wild turkey hunting season, open to young, disabled, mobility-impaired and other hunters. Youth hunts are to be held April 16, 23 and 30 and May 7, 14 and 21. Events for disabled hunters are scheduled for April 18 and 25 and May 2, 9, 16 and 23. Hunts for mobility-impaired hunters are to be held April 18 and 25 and May 2, 9, 16 and 23. And hunts for the general public are to be held April 16, 23 and 30 and May 7, 14 and 21. Hunters will be selected by lottery.
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NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | August 9, 2013
In recent years, wild turkeys have become relatively common in Maryland, seen fairly regularly in wild areas and parks, and even turning up from time to time in more suburban areas. The photograph published in Wednesday's edition of The Aegis showing a hen and her five poults in a rural Jarrettsville neighborhood shows why the population of wild turkeys has remained healthy, but it gives no indication of the human effort that went into ensuring turkeys could thrive in lands their ancestors had called home for millennia.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
WORTON -- He's Tom turkey to some. To others he's gobbler, jake or Pilgrim steak.But whatever name he goes by, the wild turkey is back and a growing legion of sportsmen and outdoor lovers are discovering that the wary and high-strung bird is both alluring and hard to find.Largely because of turkey propagation efforts by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and a steady decline in the state's waterfowl population, the wild turkey has become the game bird of choice for discriminating hunters.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 8, 2011
Russell Gordon "Buz" Meyer Sr., a conservationist who converted his Woodwardville farm into a habitat for animals and plants that he opened to Scouting groups, 4-H clubs, church camps, schoolchildren and the Audubon Society, died there Sept. 1 of pancreatic cancer. He was 80. The son of farmers, Mr. Meyer, who dropped his given name and called himself "Buz" with one "z," was raised on his parents' farm, which his Swiss immigrant grandparents had established in 1899. After graduating from Arundel High School in 1948, Mr. Meyer worked as an auto body repairman for Hill & Tibbits Ford in Washington, and then at Bauserman's Chrysler-Plymouth in Arlington, Va. In the early 1960s, he opened Buz's Body Shop behind his Woodwardville home, which he operated until 1989.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | April 4, 1993
This year's spring turkey hunt kicks off April 17 and continues through May 15 in Allegany, Calvert, Caroline, Dorchester, Frederick, Garrett, Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Somerset, Queen Anne's, Washington, Wicomico and Worcester counties.Ed Golden, who manages Maryland's wild turkey efforts, said, "We released turkeys in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties last year, so now every county has an established turkey population. Unless something unforeseen happens, I expect us to have our first statewide spring turkey season in 1995."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
WORTON -- He's Tom turkey to some. To others he's gobbler, jake or Pilgrim steak.But whatever name he goes by, the wild turkey is back and a growing legion of sportsmen and outdoor lovers are discovering that the wary and high-strung bird is both alluring and hard to find.Largely because of turkey propagation efforts by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and a steady decline in the state's waterfowl population, the wild turkey has become the game bird of choice for discriminating hunters.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
Bernard F. Halla, a former state wildlife official whose efforts helped the wild turkey make a comeback throughout Maryland, died Sunday of a heart attack at Arundel Medical Center. He was 63 and lived in Queenstown.As director of the Maryland Wildlife Administration from 1977 to 1988, he was a hands-on administrator, walking the fields and woods and studying waterways. He counted tiger salamanders, osprey nests, eagles and Delmarva fox squirrels."Our eventual aim is to learn about Maryland's game and nongame creatures so that we can preserve them as a valuable resource for the benefit and enjoyment of the public," he said in an Evening Sun article in 1974.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
In their guerrilla war with insurgent wild turkey populations in Maryland and elsewhere, grape growers have deployed falcons, shotguns, dogs, tape-recorded turkey distress calls, flashing lights and balloons shaped to look like hawks. But Paul Roberts, co-owner of Deep Creek Cellars in Western Maryland, has stumbled on a weapon of mass disruption that seems to work: blaring AM talk radio programs from speakers set up among his vines - especially on moonless nights, when the turkeys hit the grapes like drunken sailors.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1996
Although game managers have not tallied the official kill numbers, the recently completed fall season for wild turkey in Western Maryland appears to have been off significantly, according to Game Program supervisor Tom Mathews of the Department of Natural Resources."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
Maryland hunters set a state record during the spring wild turkey season this year, bagging 2,589 bearded birds to exceed the 1996 mark of 2,541.This year's take was 5 percent more than taken in 1997, when hunters killed 2,454 birds."
EXPLORE
June 17, 2011
Belated thanks (I'm still figuring things out on this new site; bear with me) to Dana O'Sullivan of Long Reach, who confirmed that my recent sighting of a wild turkey was not a mirage. In addition to commenting on my previous post, she also sent me email with photos of this seemingly out-of-place critter seen lurking on the shores of Jackson Pond. If I do this right, you should find her pictures attached to this post. She saw the bird the same day I did and, unlike me, was prepared to document the sighting.
EXPLORE
June 6, 2011
Is there an ornithologist in the house? I think I might have seen a wild turkey this morning. No, not the kind in the bottle. That won't happen before 5. On my bike ride into work I saw a kind of bird I had never before seen in these parts. I was on the pathway on the west shore of Jackson Pond in Long Reach. Standing in the grass just off the pathway was a dun-colored critter that, from beak to tailfeathers, was three or four feet long. As I approached, it sauntered behind one of the apartment buildings.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
Staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, in partnership with the National Park Service and AmeriCorps, will conduct a series of controlled burns on Patuxent Research Refuge lands Saturday through April 15. Burns will be started on the North Tract portion of the refuge, off Route 198 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, east of Laurel. Expert fire teams will burn a large field to reduce hazardous fuels, research controlling non-native plants and restore wildlife habitat. A forested unit will be burned to restore a savanna/sandy barrens habitat to benefit rare insects and plants.
NEWS
March 2, 2008
The South Laurel Recreation Center will offer a class exploring the basics of tea from noon to 2 p.m. March 9 at the Montpelier Carriage House on the mansion grounds off Route 197 in Laurel. The class will be held upstairs above The Little Tea Pot Gift shop at 9652 Muirkirk Road. Topics include the varieties and history of tea, how to brew tea and tea tasting. The cost is $18. Information: South Laurel Recreation Council, 301-776- 2805. Egg hunts planned for March 15 Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will hold its annual Spring Egg Hunts from 10 a.m. to noon March 15 at two locations.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
The Patuxent Research Refuge will offer an Earth Walk for all ages from 10:30 a.m. to noon today at the National Wildlife Visitor Center, on Powder Mill Road between the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and Route 97, near Laurel. The walk will focus on using the five senses to appreciate and understand the refuge's ecology. Admission is free, but donations to The Friends of Patuxent are appreciated. Reservations are required. Information or to reserve a place: 301-497-5887. Patuxent Research Refuge's National Wildlife Visitor Center is temporarily closed for repairs, and will remain closed through most of the spring season, but spring tram tours and other programs are being held.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
Reservoir and Atholton high schools will sponsor the 2008 Music Boosters Art Auction on Feb. 23 at Kahler Hall in the Harper's Choice Village Center. The adults-only event will raise money to purchase new instruments, uniforms and equipment for music students in both schools. The auction preview begins at 6:30 p.m., when guests can try wine and hors d'oeuvres. Door prizes and a silent auction will be offered. The auction, coordinated by Marlin Art Inc., begins at 7:30 p.m. Thirty-percent of sales will go to the music departments of both schools.
NEWS
May 11, 2000
LAWRENCEBURG, KY. -- Who would have thought bourbon and water would be a problem in Kentucky? A fire at a distillery warehouse destroyed more than 17,000 oaken barrels of Wild Turkey and sent flaming bourbon into the water supply, forcing schools and businesses in this town of 8,000 to close yesterday. The liquor never got into the tap water, because the water plant shut down as the bourbon - some of it superbly well-aged at 15 years old - splashed by on its way into the Kentucky River.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 4, 1998
NEW YORK -- Ben Franklin might have had the right idea when he suggested that the turkey, not the bald eagle, should have been selected to symbolize America. What animal could better represent Americans than the wild turkey - resistant to extermination, hard to intimidate, highly adaptable, impressionable, sociable and, yes, smart?Unfortunately for the turkey, it also happens to be fun to hunt and good to eat, facts that nearly spelled its demise by the turn of the century. Had there been an Endangered Species Act at the end of World War II, biologists say, the wild turkey wouldsurely have been listed.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 16, 2007
BOSTON -- My Thanksgiving prep began in one of those markets where, for a premium, you get a story with your food. Every vegetable, every creature and every jar of jam comes with its own pedigree and memoir. The best of these tell how the farmer and his pigs, chickens or calves live in a sylvan idyll until the day when ... well, they skip that part. These romantic tales of the farm are directed at consumers like me, a slightly uneasy carnivore and committed free-range turkey buyer who prefers to imagine her Thanksgiving dinner roaming happily over the American landscape under a clear blue sky. Of course, I am aware that the USDA definition of "free-range" means that the turkey only has to be "allowed access to the outside," even if it's too institutionalized to actually waddle through a door.
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