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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | May 25, 2000
"I knew I wanted to be a writer and illustrator before I even went to school," Maurice Sendak writes in his bio on the Educational Paperback Association's Web site. "I set my goal at the age of 4 or 5 and happily reached it." At 4 or 5, many of us were content to wish for a future as a ballerina, firefighter or magician. But Sendak is not like many of us. His imagination churned out characters like Max and his glorious footie-pajama wolf suit for "Where the Wild Things Are." Many of us have childhood memories of being tucked safely under covers and then serenaded by the soothing voice of a parent reading that Sendak classic.
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Susan Reimer | May 9, 2012
Not everything in childhood is bowls of mush and little old ladies whispering "Hush," and Maurice Sendak understood that. Our children understand that, too. Instinctively. That's what makes his books, like "Where the Wild Things Are" and "In the Night Kitchen" such a delicious experience for them. They could feel that frisson of fear and adventure without ever leaving the crook of Mommy's arm. This was especially true for our sons, who found kindred spirts in the unruly little boys of Sendak's stories.
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NEWS
March 23, 2003
IN A KEY test of sentiment, the Senate mustered a narrow bipartisan majority last week in favor of protecting Alaska's wildlife refuge from oil drilling. It was likely not the end of the decades-long battle, but it was a crushing defeat for drilling supporters who might have expected better from a Republican Congress. This should be a moment of maximum opportunity for the Alaska officials, energy companies and labor leaders who have been aching to tap into the black gold they believe lies under the frozen tundra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Somewhere the wild things are roaring their terrible roars and gnashing their terrible teeth and rolling their terrible eyes and showing their terrible claws. They're mourning their creator, children's book author Maurice Sendak, who stepped into his private boat on Tuesday and waved goodbye. The 83-year-old Sendak died Tuesday morning at a hospital in Connecticut, four days after suffering a stroke. "When I heard the news on the radio, it was just a punch in the gut," said Selma Levi, who supervises the children's department of the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library . "I know he was older.
NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN | April 8, 2006
And when he came to the place where the wild things are, they roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws. - Maurice Sendak, "Where the Wild Things Are" Once or twice every night, even more as the weather warms, the small white dog rousts himself and tears toward one window or another, huffing at the darkness. It's a jungle out there - in the suburban night. Something's stirring, passing along the brush on the yard's borders.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
It may be early yet, but here's betting there won't be a more hilarious film all year than "Wild Things."Problem is, it's not meant to be funny.Fortunately, that small matter does not detract from the hilarity of such scenes as Kevin Bacon's face when he spies two teen-age girls lip-locked in the family pool, or Neve Campbell trying to convincingly talk like ignorant gutter trash, or stone-faced Robert Wagner as a macho lawyer who comes off as threatening as...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2003
Parents and children alike remember reading Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. After an evening of mischief, Max was "sent to bed without eating anything. That very night in Max's room a forest grew and grew and grew until his ceiling hung with vines and the walls became the world all around and an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Max and he sailed off through night and day and in and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are." Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum and Library hosts the exhibit Let the Wild Rumpus Start!
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
In a scene reminiscent of "Where the Wild Things Are," the top floor of the Rouse Building in downtown Columbia will be transformed into a garden tomorrow night.Baskets of pink ivy geraniums and red and white fuchsia will hang from a trellis over the banquet room doors.Twelve weeping cherry trees and red azalea will anchor the corners of a dance floor. Four southern magnolias, measuring 6- to 8-feet high, will serve as a room divider.The occasion for this vegetation is the 11th annual Columbia Foundation fund-raiser, which begins at 6 p.m. tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 1996
The Chesapeake Bay, the marshlands, the Atlantic beaches, the hills, the farm country and mountains are home to everything from the nesting osprey to the mantis shrimp. Pears, partridge peas, blood roots and black-eyed Susans grow here, as do cat fleas and fungi."Where The Wild Things Are: The Nature of Maryland," an exhibit at the Maryland Historical Society, contains nearly 200 portrayals of such flora and fauna, native to Maryland. Five collections -- four from the 19th century, one from the 20th -- form the backbone of the exhibit.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Nuts are still green and mushrooms too risky, but the young members of Piney Run Nature Center's Ecology Club foraged successfully last week for wild edibles.Ice cream was the only store-bought fare when the nine youngsters returned to the center to feast on nature's bounty.The ice cream was slathered with a syrup made from wild black cherries -- heated to remove the poison from their pits. It was washed down with a rather bland sumac tea -- brewed from the nonpoisonous staghorn variety.The group of 9-to-13-year-olds set out after school Thursday.
NEWS
September 11, 2010
I was waiting for an elevator a few weeks ago when a little boy standing next to me, maybe three years old, unleashed an eardrum shattering belch, a burp so loud it could peel paint. His mother glanced at me, embarrassed, and admonished him to say "excuse me. " For a moment, this befuddled me. My daughter and I were just leaving the pediatrician's office for her four-month checkup, and that performance, as the father of an infant, had struck me as something meriting the highest praise.
FEATURES
October 30, 2009
Paranormal Activity ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) $21.1 million $62.5 million 5 weeks Rated : R Running time : 1:39 What it's about : The boyfriend of a haunted college student runs his camera at night to find out what's going bump in their house. Our take : It's a good stunt movie: The audience stays quiet and watchful to catch every flick of an odd breeze or toss of a sheet. Saw VI * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) $14.1 million $14.1 million 1 week Rated : R Running time : 1:31 What it's about : Back with a vengeance as well as an agenda, Jigsaw (Tobin Bell)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
What was in the water of Montgomery County when director Spike Jonze grew up there? His talented, self-destructive movie version of "Where the Wild Things Are" connects to the woe-is-me side of the childhood psyche. In Jonze's vision of the classic Maurice Sendak picture book, Max, the scamp who escapes to a world of wild things after his mother calls him a wild thing, becomes a needy guy whose new friends echo his own loneliness and melancholy. He's more of a mood-swinger than a vine-swinger.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2009
SUNDAY Vivaldi Project Concertos by Vivaldi and Bach will be performed in this program by the Vivaldi Project, featuring keyboard artists Andrew Willis and Joseph Gascho and violinist Elizabeth Field, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Baltimore Basilica, 409 Cathedral St. $10-$20. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andiemusiklive.com. Durufle Requiem The exquisite Requiem by Maurice Durufle, who was inspired by Gregorian chant, will be performed by the Central Presbyterian Chancel Choir and Orchestra at 3 p.m. at the church, 7308 York Road, Towson.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | September 18, 2008
Italian award for Maryland sculptor Sheppard Maryland native Joseph Sheppard, a world-renowned artist who divides his time between Baltimore and Pietrasanta, Italy, has received an international sculpture award from an Italian sculpture society. On Sept. 12, the arts group Circolo Culturale Fratelli Rosselli presented Sheppard with its annual sculpture award, which recognizes sculptors from around the world who have made "extraordinary contributions to the art world." Sheppard's local commissions include a 15-foot bronze sculpture at the Baltimore Holocaust Memorial at Gay and Lombard streets in Baltimore and a sculpture of Pope John Paul II that will be the focal point of the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden under construction at Franklin and Charles streets.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
Jenna Bush told CNN's Larry King last week that her father, who will soon be looking for a job, would love to become commissioner of baseball. This isn't so crazy. Way back in 1993, George W. Bush, then managing partner of the Texas Rangers, cast the only vote against including a wild card team in the playoffs. At the time, he said he would eventually be vindicated. This weekend, the lowly Colorado Rockies proved that he was right. This is an outfit that has no business being in the top ranks.
FEATURES
By Maurice Sendak | September 27, 1998
The night Max wore his wolf suit and made mischief of one kindand anotherhis mother called him "WILD THING!"and Max said "I'LL EAT YOU UP!" so he was sent to bed without eating anything.That very night in Max's room a forest grewand grew -and grew until his ceiling hung with vinesand the walls became the world all aroundand an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Maxand he sailed off through night and dayand in and out of weeksand almost over a yearto where the wild things are.And when he came to the place where the wild things arethey roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teethand rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible clawstill Max said "BE STILL!"
FEATURES
May 20, 1996
NEW YORK -- Sony Corp. has teamed up with renowed author and illustrator of children's books Maurice Sendak.Sony said the working partnership agreement covers existing and new intellectual properties of Sendak's, including books, characters and his national children's theater, "The Night Kitchen."The company said Sendak, along with John Carls, his partner in Wild Things Productions, will work with TriStar Pictures, an arm of Sony Pictures Entertainment, to develop and produce full-length feature films based on Sendak's own books and books by other artists.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,Sun reporter | February 5, 2007
What's the difference between a commercial break and a pregnant pause? Not much when it comes to Chicago Bears fan Jennifer Gordon, who last week auctioned off advertising rights to her belly in return for two 50-yard-line tickets to the Super Bowl for her and her husband, Mitch. Gordon, 35, of Lake View, Ill., who is due to give birth March 10, advertised her "My Body for Your Super Bowl Tickets" proposition online on eBay and Craigslist. After receiving 200-plus e-mail inquiries, she went with gut instinct, selecting uBid.
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