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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Bonnie Wilkins of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe for she has lost for wild rice dressing for turkey. She said that in the late 1980s, she was living in Tampa, Fla., and the Tampa Tribune ran a wonderful recipe for the dressing that contained water chestnuts as well as other ingredients. She was hoping someone might still have that one or something similar. Unfortunately, I had no luck finding the exact recipe Wilkins was in search of, but I did find an excellent recipe for wild rice and corn bread dressing that I think would be well worth her trying.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Bonnie Wilkins of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe for she has lost for wild rice dressing for turkey. She said that in the late 1980s, she was living in Tampa, Fla., and the Tampa Tribune ran a wonderful recipe for the dressing that contained water chestnuts as well as other ingredients. She was hoping someone might still have that one or something similar. Unfortunately, I had no luck finding the exact recipe Wilkins was in search of, but I did find an excellent recipe for wild rice and corn bread dressing that I think would be well worth her trying.
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By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
OUTTAKES from the summer of 2003: Here's how much rain fell on the bay: An oceanographer friend was sampling Atlantic Ocean water recently about 25 miles seaward of the two Virginia capes -- Charles and Henry -- that bound the Chesapeake's mouth. His instruments were awry, showing salt levels around 16 parts per thousand parts of water, not much more than half what should be in sea water. But on recalibrating, he discovered he was in a virtual river of freshwater pumping from the bay far out to sea, the flow from months of rainfall gushing down the 40-odd tributaries that feed the estuary.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 17, 2005
Whether you're serving a glistening, glazed ham, stately standing prime rib of beef, a sleek leg of lamb, golden roasted turkey or another equally tantalizing Christmas main course, if you're like me you may remain undecided on the side dishes until the last minute. I'm opting for a beef tenderloin as the star attraction this year, and I've picked a dessert (chocolate chestnut cheesecake) and an appetizer (Stilton surrounded with dried fruit and crisp crackers). But the accompaniments were still up in the air until a few days ago. During a recent cooking class where I prepared wild rice with apples, cranberries and sausage as part of the menu, I had a eureka moment, suddenly realizing that this side dish was so versatile it could accompany any number of holiday entrees.
FEATURES
By JOANNE E. MORVAY | May 23, 2001
Item: Omaha Steak Stuffed Chicken Breasts What you get: Two 8-ounce stuffed chicken breasts Cost: About $10 Nutritional content: Chicken With Broccoli and Cheese Stuffing: 350 calories, 11 grams fat, 3.5 grams saturated fat, 980 milligrams sodium; Chicken With Wild Rice: 290 calories, 9 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 790 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 5 minutes in microwave, 40 to 45 minutes in oven Review: There's much more to Omaha Steaks...
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | August 13, 1997
Item: Hillshire Farm Savory Fare Gourmet Cooked SausagesWhat you get: 1 pound, or about 5 servingsCost: $4.99Preparation time: 2 - 4 1/2 minutesReview: These precooked, gourmet chicken sausages (sun-dried tomatoes and Parmesan cheese or wild rice and herbs) caught my eye at the meat counter as I searched for something different to throw on my grill. Nice try here, but the texture was rubbery, the flavors overpowering. To its credit, Hillshire Farm has cut 60 percent of the fat from a typical pork dinner sausage with this recipe.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 29, 1998
In the South where I grew up, rice was a favorite dish. As a youngster I adored my grandmother's New Orleans-style red beans served over mounds of white rice, and I remember devouring my mother's fried chicken served with fluffy rice napped with pan gravy. Smothered pork chops and minute steaks, two more Southern specialties, were also accompanied by servings of simple white rice at our house.Although the rice I remember from my youth was generally boiled white rice, I've experimented with countless varieties during my cooking career.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 17, 2005
Whether you're serving a glistening, glazed ham, stately standing prime rib of beef, a sleek leg of lamb, golden roasted turkey or another equally tantalizing Christmas main course, if you're like me you may remain undecided on the side dishes until the last minute. I'm opting for a beef tenderloin as the star attraction this year, and I've picked a dessert (chocolate chestnut cheesecake) and an appetizer (Stilton surrounded with dried fruit and crisp crackers). But the accompaniments were still up in the air until a few days ago. During a recent cooking class where I prepared wild rice with apples, cranberries and sausage as part of the menu, I had a eureka moment, suddenly realizing that this side dish was so versatile it could accompany any number of holiday entrees.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1996
If you're tired of the usual, you may want to try this soup and cake for a change.Melinda L. Day of Owensboro, Ky., wrote that she very much wanted a recipe for a mushroom and wild-rice soup similar to the one she had last year in Chicago at the Moonraker, "a small, quaint restaurant, and it was absolutely great."Her response came from Linda E. Loney of Walla Walla, Wash., who found her recipe in the Spokesman Review of Spokane, Wash., which called for shiitake mushrooms. "We have found it equally delectable when made with the plain fresh white mushrooms from the grocery store," she wrote.
FEATURES
November 24, 1991
For the holidays, Beverly Cox developed a menu based around wild ducks stuffed with wild rice and wild mushrooms.I= Here are the recipes, taken from "Spirit of the Harvest":Ducks stuffed with wild rice and wild mushroomsRTC Serves six to eight.2 Long Island ducklings (3 1/2 to 4 pounds each)salt and ground pepper, to taste3 tablespoons hazelnut or sunflower oil1 1/2 cups sliced wild mushrooms (crimini, shiitake, morels or oyster mushrooms)1 cup sliced green onions1 cup blanched hazelnuts1/2 teaspoon dill seed4 cups cooked wild rice2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or parsleyRinse ducks and pat dry. If you want to use giblets in the stuffing, trim off tough outer layer from gizzards; thinly slice giblets and reserve.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
OUTTAKES from the summer of 2003: Here's how much rain fell on the bay: An oceanographer friend was sampling Atlantic Ocean water recently about 25 miles seaward of the two Virginia capes -- Charles and Henry -- that bound the Chesapeake's mouth. His instruments were awry, showing salt levels around 16 parts per thousand parts of water, not much more than half what should be in sea water. But on recalibrating, he discovered he was in a virtual river of freshwater pumping from the bay far out to sea, the flow from months of rainfall gushing down the 40-odd tributaries that feed the estuary.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
Maryland's newest state lawmakers, still aglow from their election victories, converged on the State House in Annapolis yesterday, affixed large name tags to their lapels and promptly got their first lesson in budget cutting. Their orientation, they were told, was being curtailed in order to save money. Four years ago, freshman orientation was a three-day affair, followed by a six-day bus tour of the state. This time around it's down to two days, and the tour is cut in half. So the information is tightly packed.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
Although I enjoy preparing the feast for our family on Thanksgiving Day, I confess that I look forward even more to the dishes made with the leftovers. These creations are less time-consuming to prepare because some of the ingredients are already cooked. Like many people, I buy a large bird so that there will be plenty of turkey remaining for the days after the holiday. And I make twice as much dressing and cranberry sauce as we need for the same reason. Turkey sandwiches are a staple at our house after the big Thursday.
FEATURES
By JOANNE E. MORVAY | May 23, 2001
Item: Omaha Steak Stuffed Chicken Breasts What you get: Two 8-ounce stuffed chicken breasts Cost: About $10 Nutritional content: Chicken With Broccoli and Cheese Stuffing: 350 calories, 11 grams fat, 3.5 grams saturated fat, 980 milligrams sodium; Chicken With Wild Rice: 290 calories, 9 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 790 milligrams sodium Preparation time: 5 minutes in microwave, 40 to 45 minutes in oven Review: There's much more to Omaha Steaks...
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 25, 1999
During the many years I lived in Ohio, I always looked forward to summer, when I could prepare picnics to take to outdoor concerts in Columbus.Occasionally, my husband and I would travel to Blossom, an outdoor music festival near Cleveland, and enjoy a picnic on the sprawling lawns there, or we'd share a picnic supper with friends while en route to the Cincinnati opera.Now that I live in western Massachusetts, I continue this summer ritual and pack food in baskets to enjoy at Tanglewood, where the Boston Symphony plays from June to August, or at the Mount, Edith Wharton's former home, now the site of summer Shakespearean productions.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 29, 1998
In the South where I grew up, rice was a favorite dish. As a youngster I adored my grandmother's New Orleans-style red beans served over mounds of white rice, and I remember devouring my mother's fried chicken served with fluffy rice napped with pan gravy. Smothered pork chops and minute steaks, two more Southern specialties, were also accompanied by servings of simple white rice at our house.Although the rice I remember from my youth was generally boiled white rice, I've experimented with countless varieties during my cooking career.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | November 18, 2001
Although I enjoy preparing the feast for our family on Thanksgiving Day, I confess that I look forward even more to the dishes made with the leftovers. These creations are less time-consuming to prepare because some of the ingredients are already cooked. Like many people, I buy a large bird so that there will be plenty of turkey remaining for the days after the holiday. And I make twice as much dressing and cranberry sauce as we need for the same reason. Turkey sandwiches are a staple at our house after the big Thursday.
FEATURES
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 19, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family or holiday meal, usually Sunday, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation and an entertaining menu, usually the...
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 19, 1998
More than any other time of the year, in the summer months I entertain spontaneously. I think nothing of telephoning friends in the afternoon to invite them for a last-minute supper that evening. This past week, for example, when neighbors called in the morning to ask if we would like to see a new film one night, I impulsively asked them to have a light supper at our house afterward.Obviously, the menu for this as well as my other hastily conceived meals has to be simple. I offered bowls of black and green olives along with creamy goat cheese sprinkled with herbs as post-cinema appetizers.
FEATURES
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 19, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family or holiday meal, usually Sunday, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation and an entertaining menu, usually the...
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