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NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 11, 1991
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:Marvin Solomon, Baltimore: Concerning your comment on William Donald Schaefer's nickname. I am a same-year graduate of City College as The Guv and just a page or two away in the yearbook.Here is the verbatim write-up under Schaefer's photo:DONALD SCHAEFERTo study Law.Lacrosse 4 . . . Soccer 4 . . . "Don" . . . Jayvee Soccer 3 . . . Wild Man . . . Jayvee Lacrosse 3 . . . Neat . . . Student Advisory Council 2 . . . Honor Society 4 . . . Glee Club 3 . . . Committee, "Journey's End."
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus , don.markus@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
COLLEGE PARK -- In a season when the Maryland basketball team has discovered a scorer in sophomore guard Sean Mosley (St. Frances) and a rebounder in freshman center Jordan Williams, the Terrapins are still looking for the player who led them in both categories - as well as assists - last season. Senior guard Greivis Vasquez has played in all eight games this season for Maryland (5-3), but which player shows up today at Comcast Center to play Eastern Kentucky remains in question.
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NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
The way his older sister tells it, Broadneck junior goalie Sam Peterson "is a wild man. Always has been, always will be.""When he was younger, whenever you turned around, he was jumping off of a couch or riding his Big Wheel in traffic," said Annapolis girls lacrosse coach Sue Chittim, who is 12 years Sam's senior."
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
The first time he walked onto the stage of his high school in Baltimore, Kerry Brandon didn't realize he was about to find his vocation. He was hanging out with friends who were rehearsing for a musical. "I made the mistake of walking onto the stage at just the right moment - the director needed somebody," Brandon said. It was a small part. Brandon, a high school senior at the time, was on stage for less than a minute. But it was enough to catch the theater bug. Today, Brandon is technical director of Wilde Lake High School and the school's Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts.
SPORTS
By Joe Gergen and Joe Gergen,Newsday | January 17, 1994
SAN FRANCISCO -- The story is unattributed but nevertheless accepted as gospel.On the occasion of Ricky Watters' very first carry in the NFL, against the New York Giants no less, the San Francisco running back untangled himself from a pile of bodies at The Meadowlands, high-stepped back to the huddle and told his 49ers teammates, "They can't stop me." While that may have been a slight exaggeration, it was no lie.As a rookie, Watters ran all the way to the Pro Bowl. Sidelined for three weeks by a knee injury this season, he nevertheless rushed for 950 yards and Saturday tore the Giants defense to shreds with an effort that established several postseason records.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus , don.markus@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
COLLEGE PARK -- In a season when the Maryland basketball team has discovered a scorer in sophomore guard Sean Mosley (St. Frances) and a rebounder in freshman center Jordan Williams, the Terrapins are still looking for the player who led them in both categories - as well as assists - last season. Senior guard Greivis Vasquez has played in all eight games this season for Maryland (5-3), but which player shows up today at Comcast Center to play Eastern Kentucky remains in question.
NEWS
April 29, 2005
Mason Adams, 86, known for his Emmy-nominated role on the television series Lou Grant and as the voice behind the Smucker's jelly commercials, died Tuesday at his home in New York City. His distinctive, often fatherly voice was first heard in 1940s and 1950s radio serials, including "Batman" and "Pepper Young's Family." But he did not achieve fame until being cast as Charlie Hume in Lou Grant, a spin-off of The Mary Tyler Moore Show that ran from 1977 to 1982. Mr. Adams earned three Emmy nominations for his work on the series.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Bill Stealey moves through life like one of the mirrors in a kaleidoscope. He is constantly moving, creating an ever-changing and colorful landscape. He's a gamesman, a salesman, a businessman and the owner of the Baltimore Spirit soccer team.He has been an adviser to the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon and a U.S. Air Force flight instructor and jet fighter pilot. He graduated from the Air Force Academy, earned an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business and worked for several management companies before creating his own business, MicroProse.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 14, 1994
When Wild Man Joe O'Connell went looking for a fight, nobody was safe, including Joe himself. You could look it up. Pro boxers, street fighters, carnival brawlers, he took 'em all on. Plus, not to be overlooked, a gorilla and a kangaroo who should have known better.For the record, Joe says the gorilla and the kangaroo were the roughest fights he had. But that's just his word. Nobody's asked the gorilla or the kangaroo their side of it."I just liked to fight," Joe was explaining yesterday.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
William J. Rowan loves to talk turkey. He also lives to hunt them.So it was a bit of shock to his hunting buddies earlier this month when Bill Rowan didn't show up at his Western Maryland hunting trailer for the fall wild turkey season. Instead, he spent that week as a volunteer helping two flocks of the wild birdssurvive their first winter in the Sweet Air section of Gunpowder Falls State Park."It was the first turkey season I've missed in eight years," Mr. Rowan said.The wooded terrain between Sweet Air Road and the Little Gunpowder Falls is only the second area in Baltimore County where wild turkey flocks -- which had largely vanished by the turn of the century as land was cleared for agriculture -- have been reintroduced.
TRAVEL
By Thomas Curwen and Thomas Curwen,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. -- The late July storm broke over the valley like a wave over the prow of a ship. Hikers, emerging from the forest, dashed across stretches of lawn as lightning cut across the darkening sky. Couples in canoes awkwardly zigzagged their way toward the dock as thunder rumbled overhead. In front of the Many Glacier Hotel, picnickers packed up their lunch and scurried toward the first open door. Inside, a hastily built fire gained strength and filled the lobby with the scent of burning pine.
NEWS
April 29, 2005
Mason Adams, 86, known for his Emmy-nominated role on the television series Lou Grant and as the voice behind the Smucker's jelly commercials, died Tuesday at his home in New York City. His distinctive, often fatherly voice was first heard in 1940s and 1950s radio serials, including "Batman" and "Pepper Young's Family." But he did not achieve fame until being cast as Charlie Hume in Lou Grant, a spin-off of The Mary Tyler Moore Show that ran from 1977 to 1982. Mr. Adams earned three Emmy nominations for his work on the series.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 23, 2003
It wasn't exactly the Road to Damascus. But an L.A. freeway was a great place for Bobcat Goldthwait to have a revelation. "I went, `Bobcat? How did I become Bobcat?' " he says, his familiar voice cracking and searching for an octave it no longer hits. "My fiancee looks at me, and I just keep saying, `How did this happen? I'm 41 years old!' " Yes, he's really 41. As to how Robert became "Bobcat," that goes back to his teen years, when he and his childhood friend, the future SpongeBob Tom Kenny, were "Bobcat and Tomcat."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
O'Donel Levy plays a long, lovely solo on his guitar while a photographer dances aroudn him, searching for the definitive image of the jazz musician at work. Levy's a big man in a beret and a dark blue suit who improvises with taut concentration, funky force and spidery delicacy. As the solo ends, he's a bit winded. "Your heart just goes out through the strings," he says. "It's like everything you want to say you always seem to be able to say it better, speak better, through [the guitar]
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 8, 1998
"Wild Man Blues," Barbara Kopple's documentary about Woody Allen's 1996 European tour with his Dixieland jazz band, is a fascinating film, not only for the truths it reveals but for the problems it presents.For one thing, "Wild Man Blues" is produced by Jean Doumanian, Allen's producer and good friend. Kopple has shown herself to be a highly principled filmmaker in such films as "Harlan County, U.S.A." and "American Dream," both about the contemporary American labor movement. But Doumanian's imprimatur raises troubling questions about control and objectivity.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1997
A Circuit Court jury yesterday found 23-year-old Christopher Falk guilty of being the graffiti writer whose "SPC" signature marred scores of buildings throughout Columbia before his arrest last year.The jury deliberated for two hours at the end of the two-day trial, handing down the guilty verdict for 14 counts of malicious destruction of property -- one a felony offense.Falk, a Wilde Lake High School graduate who lives with his parents in that Columbia village, is to be sentenced July 31, said Sang W. Oh, the county prosecutor who tried the Falk case in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 25, 1991
As Richard Tschiderer lay in an Army hospital bed in Texas in November 1973, semi-paralyzed and nearly blind from a motorcycle crash, nothing had ever tasted as good as the Thanksgiving turkey dinner the nurses served up."Society has put up with a lot from me," said the self-described "former wild smart-ass," so the time has come for a little payback.For Mr. Tschiderer, 38, executive chef and food production supervisor at Baltimore County General Hospital in Randallstown, this year's installment is the feast he will cook on Thanksgiving for about 220 mentally and physically handicapped people at the Pikesville Armory.
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder | September 27, 1991
ROBIN WILLIAMS is wearing a T-shirt that says "Look Don't Stare," but it's hard not to.Moments after sitting down to promote his new movie, "The Fisher King," his quiet persona switches into untamed hobgoblin, and Williams becomes a manic creature, all strange voices, wired mannerisms and lethal observations.Take, for instance, his off-the-cuff riffs on the following topics:On Julia Roberts' breakup with fiance Kiefer Sutherland: "Why'd it fail, babe? Come on, tell me. And can I have the gift back?
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
The Howard County state's attorney's office is awaiting a written ruling from the state medical examiner to determine whether to charge anyone in the Nov. 9 death of a Wilde Lake resident, State's Attorney Marna McLendon said yesterday.Police have received an oral ruling from the medical examiner's office that the death of George Leroy Nicholson, 43, in Columbia's Long Reach village will be deemed a homicide, said Sgt. Steven Keller, a police spokesman.Nicholson's death had been labeled a "suspicious death" by the police pending the results of the autopsy.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
William J. Rowan loves to talk turkey. He also lives to hunt them.So it was a bit of shock to his hunting buddies earlier this month when Bill Rowan didn't show up at his Western Maryland hunting trailer for the fall wild turkey season. Instead, he spent that week as a volunteer helping two flocks of the wild birdssurvive their first winter in the Sweet Air section of Gunpowder Falls State Park."It was the first turkey season I've missed in eight years," Mr. Rowan said.The wooded terrain between Sweet Air Road and the Little Gunpowder Falls is only the second area in Baltimore County where wild turkey flocks -- which had largely vanished by the turn of the century as land was cleared for agriculture -- have been reintroduced.
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