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NEWS
By TOM HORTON | August 12, 1995
For the bay's wild geese, and for those who love to hunt them, or just love them, these are the worst of times, the best of times, the most challenging of times.The Atlantic flyway, stretching from northern Quebec to the Carolinas, is awash in Canada geese -- well over a million if you count this summers' hatchlings; more than in the peak years of the late 1970s.And the snow goose has increased to where it may be degrading its own nesting grounds. Marylanders could shoot 535 snows apiece if they took full advantage of the 107-day season -- and could figure how to kill the allowed, five-a-day of the notoriously hard-to-decoy birds.
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NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Leonardtown -- These days, Maryland's front line of defense against an invasion of the deadly bird flu looks, quite literally, like a wild goose chase. On foot, in trucks and by boat, a team of biologists from the Department of Natural Resources is swooping down on flocks of geese to test them for avian influenza, specifically Asian H5N1, a strain that has caused the death of more than 100 people and millions of birds overseas. Wildlife experts suspect that if the deadly form of the virus enters this country, it will most likely be through birds that mingle in the arctic during the breeding season before returning to their wintering grounds.
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FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Have you heard the wild geese call or seen the sky suddenly darken with geese flying in perfect formation? Surely one of the ++ great wonders of fall. A good place to experience the fall migration is Maryland's Eastern Shore, where an estimated 600,000 Canadian geese spend the winter months. It is often referred to as the "goose capital of the world," a title held by Hatteras, N.C., until the 1950s.Another reason to visit is the annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton next weekend, an event that attracts scores of wildfowl lovers from around the world each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Book Editor | May 23, 2004
As I write, I have just spent a half-hour in the living room of our weekend house in very rural Pennsylvania, binoculars focused on the pond. On it float two adult Canada geese, heads high and ranging, vigilant against predators. Between them, seven very fluffy, gray-tan goslings feed vigorously on waterweeds. Hatched 18 to 20 days ago, they eat almost constantly - in the water and on grass. They have almost doubled in size in the last nine days. The parents, we think but cannot be sure, are Popeye and Olive, who nested here last year.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | September 11, 1993
When we wrote in late August of the political shootout over restoring Maryland's dwindling flocks of wild geese, it looked like the conservative game managers of the Department of Natural Resources would emerge from the fray minus a few feathers, yet flying strong.But wait: Something stirs in a hunting blind artfully camouflaged to look like the governor's office.A long, potent barrel -- a Speaker of the House Special -- trains on our DNR "conservation goose," just as it is about to cross the deadline for setting fall shooting limits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Book Editor | May 23, 2004
As I write, I have just spent a half-hour in the living room of our weekend house in very rural Pennsylvania, binoculars focused on the pond. On it float two adult Canada geese, heads high and ranging, vigilant against predators. Between them, seven very fluffy, gray-tan goslings feed vigorously on waterweeds. Hatched 18 to 20 days ago, they eat almost constantly - in the water and on grass. They have almost doubled in size in the last nine days. The parents, we think but cannot be sure, are Popeye and Olive, who nested here last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991
There'll be a little something new and a lot of something old at this year's Baltimore City Fair, which begins at noon today and runs through Sunday night.What's new is the site: After years of nomadic wandering at various locations around the Inner Harbor and downtown, the City Fair is being held in the parking lot across from Memorial Stadium next to the vacant Eastern High School building.What's old is the 22nd annual event's emphasis on neighborhoods, a focus that fueled the first years of the fair's existence but one that critics feel had been sorely lacking in recent years.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Leonardtown -- These days, Maryland's front line of defense against an invasion of the deadly bird flu looks, quite literally, like a wild goose chase. On foot, in trucks and by boat, a team of biologists from the Department of Natural Resources is swooping down on flocks of geese to test them for avian influenza, specifically Asian H5N1, a strain that has caused the death of more than 100 people and millions of birds overseas. Wildlife experts suspect that if the deadly form of the virus enters this country, it will most likely be through birds that mingle in the arctic during the breeding season before returning to their wintering grounds.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 17, 1999
Measuring the value of her three-story Cambridge home has never been difficult for Katie Coleman -- she can do it in 100 steps."That's how far we are from the water," she said. "I know that walk by heart."The Colemans' wood-frame home is near the bank of the Choptank River as it meanders through the Eastern Shore city. From the comfort of their screened-in front porch, Mrs. Coleman and her husband Keith can just see the water's edge.And that's why the couple said they can't imagine living anywhere else.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 27, 1994
From The Sun Feb. 27-March 5, 1844* Feb. 28: Young Rowdies -- A party of half grown lads have been in the habit of assembling about the neighborhood of the Front Street Theater, pitching cents and insulting by most abusive and vulgar language all passers by.* March 2: Large flocks of wild geese passed over the city onSaturday and yesterday, wending their way to the north. This is regarded by most people as an unerring sign of the breaking up of winter.From The Sun Feb. 27-March 5, 1894* Feb. 27: The question whether street railway companies using cables are responsible for the damage caused when a carriage wheel slips into the cable slot is raised by a suit of Joseph E. Baker against the Traction Company.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 17, 1999
Measuring the value of her three-story Cambridge home has never been difficult for Katie Coleman -- she can do it in 100 steps."That's how far we are from the water," she said. "I know that walk by heart."The Colemans' wood-frame home is near the bank of the Choptank River as it meanders through the Eastern Shore city. From the comfort of their screened-in front porch, Mrs. Coleman and her husband Keith can just see the water's edge.And that's why the couple said they can't imagine living anywhere else.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | August 12, 1995
For the bay's wild geese, and for those who love to hunt them, or just love them, these are the worst of times, the best of times, the most challenging of times.The Atlantic flyway, stretching from northern Quebec to the Carolinas, is awash in Canada geese -- well over a million if you count this summers' hatchlings; more than in the peak years of the late 1970s.And the snow goose has increased to where it may be degrading its own nesting grounds. Marylanders could shoot 535 snows apiece if they took full advantage of the 107-day season -- and could figure how to kill the allowed, five-a-day of the notoriously hard-to-decoy birds.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | September 11, 1993
When we wrote in late August of the political shootout over restoring Maryland's dwindling flocks of wild geese, it looked like the conservative game managers of the Department of Natural Resources would emerge from the fray minus a few feathers, yet flying strong.But wait: Something stirs in a hunting blind artfully camouflaged to look like the governor's office.A long, potent barrel -- a Speaker of the House Special -- trains on our DNR "conservation goose," just as it is about to cross the deadline for setting fall shooting limits.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Have you heard the wild geese call or seen the sky suddenly darken with geese flying in perfect formation? Surely one of the ++ great wonders of fall. A good place to experience the fall migration is Maryland's Eastern Shore, where an estimated 600,000 Canadian geese spend the winter months. It is often referred to as the "goose capital of the world," a title held by Hatteras, N.C., until the 1950s.Another reason to visit is the annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton next weekend, an event that attracts scores of wildfowl lovers from around the world each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991
There'll be a little something new and a lot of something old at this year's Baltimore City Fair, which begins at noon today and runs through Sunday night.What's new is the site: After years of nomadic wandering at various locations around the Inner Harbor and downtown, the City Fair is being held in the parking lot across from Memorial Stadium next to the vacant Eastern High School building.What's old is the 22nd annual event's emphasis on neighborhoods, a focus that fueled the first years of the fair's existence but one that critics feel had been sorely lacking in recent years.
FEATURES
March 17, 1992
Hurray for St. Patrick's Day. Even if you missed Sunday's parade there's still time to celebrate. Here are a few area events in honor of St. Patrick:* "Hear My Song" is yours for a song (free admission that is) if you show up at the Rotunda Twin Cinemas for the 7:30 p.m. show wearing green on St. Patrick's Day. Ned Beatty plays an Irish tenor who flees England for non-payment of taxes, and a downtrodden promoter tries to lure him back for a last concert. The theater is at 711 W. 40th St.* The Cat's Eye Pub, at 1730 Thames St., will celebrate its 17th anniversary by giving away Irish coffee poured into commemorative mugs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
SYKESVILLE -- Careless fishermen can be the death of Piney Run Lake's wild geese and ducks.Anglers are fouling the lake and shoreline with discarded gear that is lethal to the birds."
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