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EXPLORE
April 12, 2012
Howard County Fairgrounds is hosting a traveling show of sorrow, fear, and pain this week. A circus that uses exotic animals as "entertainment" is coming to town. I urge all Maryland residents to say "no" to financially supporting circuses that use wild animals. Please ask you congressperson to support HR 3359, the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act, and help end the use of exotic animals in traveling circuses. Jennifer Jones Columbia
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NEWS
May 31, 2014
If dolphins would be better off in the wild, why would anyone presume dogs and cats would be any different ( "Group urges National Aquarium to free dolphins," May 24)? Wild animals have shorter lives than do "captive" ones. Dolphins, lions, tigers and bears struggle to compete in the wild, which is good for the species but tough on the individual animal. We have all seen a feral dog or cat, have empathy for it but can't get close to it. No different for dolphins. They look great jumping through the water in Ocean City , but you can't get close to them.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2012
People aren't the only ones at risk from eating mercury-contaminated fish, since coal-burning power plants have liberally sprinkled the toxic metal across the earth's waters.  But it appears that captive dolphins have a little less to worry about in that regard than their wild counterparts. A new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the National Aquarium in Baltimore found that the aquarium's captive bottlenose dolphins have lower levels of mercury in their bodies than wild dolphins tested off the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 2, 2014
You may find yourself wanting to make travel plans after seeing "Nature Visions" at the Meeting House Gallery. Organized by the Mid-Atlantic Photography Association, this group exhibit features beautiful landscapes, wild animals posing for close-up portraits, and other photogenic examples of natural abundance. One of the most imposing wilderness views can be seen in Louise McLaughlin's "Spirit Island. " Shot in the Canadian Rockies, this photo offers a panoramic view of soaring conifer trees beside a lake whose waters are so still that you're prompted to silently linger over this scene.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
It's a situation that pits a wild-animal lover against the state agency designed to protect such animals, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).Howard County animal activist Colleen Layton says she has saved more than 100 hurt or sick animals over the past 18 years. But the DNR says her efforts are illegal, and it has moved to stop her from taking in more wild animals.DNR officials seized four skunks and two raccoons from Ms. Layton's 5-acre farm on Route 99 in Woodstock in the past month, saying she violated state law by breeding the raccoons and caring for the skunks.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
The Baltimore County Health Department issued a rabies warning yesterday, prompted by an attack by a rabid fox Sunday afternoon on a youth sitting outside his home in the Towson area.Brian Klug, 16, was working on model rockets on his front steps in the 900 block of Metfield Road when he felt a pinch on his back. He thought it was the family Irish setter being playful."I didn't even see it until after it bit me," Brian said. "At first I thought it was our dog, then I realized it really hurt.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
British animal trainer Martin Lacey jr. shows off a white lion cub born at the end of August at the Circus Krone in Hamburg,  Germany. The rare birth has set off discussions in Germany about whether the circus should be banned from having wild animals.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 1, 2014
It's a disease that's been known and feared for hundreds of years, and for good reason. Rabies is a viral infection of a variety that, once symptoms start to show, it's too late to do anything to prevent the disease from progressing. Once it starts progressing, a frightening and painful trajectory to death is all but inevitable (there have been fewer than 10 documented cases of people surviving an infection once symptoms are detected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control)
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
Peter Kahl's two-year fight to save his Glen Arm snake-breeding operation went to Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday as lawyers squared off over the fate of his $500,000-a-year business.Attorneys for Kahl's neighbors -- who say his 50- by-100-foot breeding barn could damage their property values -- argue that his operation is only permitted in business zones where pet stores and other commercial uses are allowed."He's stretching the definition of agriculture to suit himself," said Carole Demilio, who argued the case with J. Carroll Holzer.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
Reported cases of rabies are going down in Maryland, but Carroll ranks third in the number of confirmed cases, with 22 reported in 1995 -- matching the total for last year when the county ranked 10th in reported cases.Despite Carroll's increase in the rankings, health officials say that the numbers aren't particularly significant. The changes reflect geographical fluctuations in Maryland's raccoon population."We have not discerned anything unusual in the rabies cases this year," said Suzanne P. Albert, a nurse consultant at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 1, 2014
It's a disease that's been known and feared for hundreds of years, and for good reason. Rabies is a viral infection of a variety that, once symptoms start to show, it's too late to do anything to prevent the disease from progressing. Once it starts progressing, a frightening and painful trajectory to death is all but inevitable (there have been fewer than 10 documented cases of people surviving an infection once symptoms are detected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control)
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Baltimore County health officials found a rabid cat in the Milford Mill area and are looking for anyone who may have been exposed to the animal. The feral cat was gray, tan and white and lived among a group of other cats near Rhonda Court. The animal has since died of rabies. Health officials are seeking anyone who may have had exposure to the cat between March 28 and April 12. They are also encouraging neighbors to keep pets - particularly cats - indoors as they attempt to capture the other feral cats in the neighborhood.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2012
People aren't the only ones at risk from eating mercury-contaminated fish, since coal-burning power plants have liberally sprinkled the toxic metal across the earth's waters.  But it appears that captive dolphins have a little less to worry about in that regard than their wild counterparts. A new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the National Aquarium in Baltimore found that the aquarium's captive bottlenose dolphins have lower levels of mercury in their bodies than wild dolphins tested off the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida.
EXPLORE
April 12, 2012
Howard County Fairgrounds is hosting a traveling show of sorrow, fear, and pain this week. A circus that uses exotic animals as "entertainment" is coming to town. I urge all Maryland residents to say "no" to financially supporting circuses that use wild animals. Please ask you congressperson to support HR 3359, the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act, and help end the use of exotic animals in traveling circuses. Jennifer Jones Columbia
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 16, 2012
Spring brings all kinds of new life. The Assateague Island Allia nce reports two foals born recently to the wild horse herd that roams the National Seashore near Ocean City. The little filly pictured here was born last Friday to an 8-year-old mare dubbed April Star (aka N2BHS-C, under the alpha-numeric identification system used by the National Park Service to track the genetic lineage of the herd). The alliance, which holds an an annual horse naming auction to help support management of the animals, initially reported that this was the only new addition expected this year to the 114-horse herd because of the contraceptives administered to keep the wild animals from overpopulating the narrow, sandy barrier island.  But late yesterday, the alliance emailed that a second foal had been spotted by a park staffer, this one born to a mare named Queen Latifah (aka N9BFT)
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
British animal trainer Martin Lacey jr. shows off a white lion cub born at the end of August at the Circus Krone in Hamburg,  Germany. The rare birth has set off discussions in Germany about whether the circus should be banned from having wild animals.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 16, 2012
Spring brings all kinds of new life. The Assateague Island Allia nce reports two foals born recently to the wild horse herd that roams the National Seashore near Ocean City. The little filly pictured here was born last Friday to an 8-year-old mare dubbed April Star (aka N2BHS-C, under the alpha-numeric identification system used by the National Park Service to track the genetic lineage of the herd). The alliance, which holds an an annual horse naming auction to help support management of the animals, initially reported that this was the only new addition expected this year to the 114-horse herd because of the contraceptives administered to keep the wild animals from overpopulating the narrow, sandy barrier island.  But late yesterday, the alliance emailed that a second foal had been spotted by a park staffer, this one born to a mare named Queen Latifah (aka N9BFT)
NEWS
December 26, 2010
I'd like to defend the Department of Natural Resources in their actions concerning the recent rescue by two men of a deer trapped in the ice in the Patapsco. There seems to be a lot of public outrage against them, and they deserve a defense. The "N" in DNR stands for "natural," from its root "nature. " It is perfectly natural for deer to get trapped in the ice and die. What is unnatural is for animal lovers to try to save them. It is not in any sense of the word "inhumane" to let the deer die in their natural environment.
NEWS
December 26, 2010
I'd like to defend the Department of Natural Resources in their actions concerning the recent rescue by two men of a deer trapped in the ice in the Patapsco. There seems to be a lot of public outrage against them, and they deserve a defense. The "N" in DNR stands for "natural," from its root "nature. " It is perfectly natural for deer to get trapped in the ice and die. What is unnatural is for animal lovers to try to save them. It is not in any sense of the word "inhumane" to let the deer die in their natural environment.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
Howard County's own monkey case is not about evolution like the famous 1920s Scopes trial in Tennessee, but after 11 years of hearings, trials and testimony, it might seem to be just as drawn out. The legal struggle over Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary, located since 1993 on a 4-acre site at 10790 Old Frederick Road in Woodstock, is to resume with a 6:30 p.m. Board of Appeals hearing in the county's Columbia offices Thursday. The struggle between Frisky's operator, Colleen Layton-Robbins, and neighbors who claim having wild animals nearby is a danger has already gone all the way to the Maryland Court of Appeals.
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