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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Dang, Eric Hartley wants me to be responsible . In a private note, which he has given me permission to use, along with his name, he gently reproaches me for the rhetorical excesses in my most recent post on Wikipedia. He has something there, as you will see. After quoting his note at length, I will try to present a more nuanced and balanced evaluation of Wikipedia's usefulness and limitations. It will be duller than the previous. Mr. Hartley: " To answer your question [ Am I expected to believe that the multitudes who consult Wikipedia every day are using it as a jumping-off point for further research?
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SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
With national signing day a day away, preview the Terps ' class of 2014 with a handy, commit-by-commit guide. Prospect profiles will run all the way through Wednesday (Feb. 5), when players can officially sign a national letter of intent. ( SEE THEM ALL HERE. ) Name: David Shaw Position: Defensive tackle Measurables: 6 feet 4, 270 pounds High school: Spring Grove (Pa.) Recruiter: John Dunn Finalists: Connecticut, Temple, Penn State Rankings: 247: 2*, No. 141 DT Rivals: 3* ESPN : 3*, No. 107 DT Stats/honors: 63 tackles, five sacks, fumble recovery; Big 33 Football Classic honoree, York-Adams League Division I All-Star Quoted for emphasis: “I see him as a dual threat - he's big, he's fast, he's quick and he's got a little bit of something from his brothers.” Breakdown: On Wikipedia, there are three “football rivalries” linked with Maryland: Virginia , West Virginia and … Penn State . The first two teams, to the discerning young Maryland fan and Wikipedia user, are no surprise to see. The teams have met regularly, and played fiercely, over the past decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The Walters Art Museum is donating more than 19,000 images of artworks from its collection to the organization running Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia that is created and edited by users. The images will be available for Wikipedia articles in any language, and can be downloaded free of charge. A spokeswoman for the museum said Tuesday that the Walters is just one of several libraries, archives and museums participating in the collaborative effort to provide public access to their collections.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
I've lived in Maryland for my entire life, and I didn't even know that Frederick County had its own holiday on November 23rd until this week. On this week's episode of J. Doug at Night , House of Delegates candidate Darren Wigfield introduced us to the concept of Repudiation Day, the first act of defiance by British Colonists against the stamp act. The day was made a holiday by the Maryland General Assembly during its 1894 session....
NEWS
By TEAGUE LYONS | March 19, 2006
Feeling insignificant? Here's the remedy: Create an Internet-based encyclopedia entry about yourself. All you need do is log on to www.wikipedia.org and write your life's accomplishments. Once you're finished, it will be available instantly to Internet browsers everywhere. Wikipedia isn't some online sideshow, either. It is used by tens of millions of people every week - more than CNN.com. Wikipedia is an interactive online encyclopedia that anyone can work with; you can create your own entries and edit existing ones.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | March 17, 2009
YouTube. MySpace. iPod. CareerBuilder. Two words fused together with a capital letter in the middle: The construction seems like it has been standard form all our lives. And yet, as Andrew Lih describes in his book that comes out today, The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia, so-called CamelCase was the way computer programmers designated topics that would be linked together on the Internet. And it became the technical underpinning for Wikipedia, the popular online encyclopedia that launched in 2001, about the time the commercial world adopted the spelling quirk to name companies and products.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | March 3, 2008
Maryland lawmakers are among the most thoroughly documented politicians on Wikipedia, the hugely popular Web encyclopedia compiled by tens of thousands of users around the world. And it's in large part because of one Internet-obsessed pol from Baltimore: Del. Curtis S. Anderson. Under the monikers "Marylandstater," "1msulax" and "67knight," the 58-year-old Democrat and former television reporter has spent countless hours researching and creating detailed profiles of fellow members of the General Assembly.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 8, 2008
Elections officials begin ballot count in Ghana ACCRA, Ghana : Elections officials began counting ballots late yesterday in one of Africa's rare democracies, where voters are painfully aware of the example they are setting on a continent better known for coups, rigged elections and one-man rule. In courtyards throughout the capital, elections officials put police tape around the plywood tables where they began sorting ballots. Hundreds of voters slept on the pavement outside their polling stations in an effort to be first yesterday to cast their ballot.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
A recent letter to the editor by William D. Young of Timonium titled "Mosque Near Ground Zero a travesty" (Readers Respond, baltimoresun.com) included his assertion that there were "nearly 800,000 (yes 800,000) mosques in New York City. " Wikipedia estimates there are approximately 1,300 mosques in the entire United States. While I can't vouch for the accuracy of Wikipedia, I think the 800,000 figure can be fairly easily debunked. In addition he states that the center will house a memorial honoring the 9/11 hijackers.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | November 26, 2006
Yes, it's true: Blogs have brought down politicians, exposed media scandals, outed criminals, highlighted questionable police conduct and served as suicide notes for the recently departed. Many blogs have become deadly serious - and deadly dull. But not all. Many others have stayed true to the original spirit of blogging, offering readers heaping doses of absolutely useless yet completely engrossing ephemera. Here is but a small sample of what's been floating around in the not-so-serious sectors of the Internet recently: Optical Poptitude (opticalpoptitude.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Only yesterday I posted about the hissy that Buzzfeed pitched over literally in the figurative sense . Today at Slate Simon Akam is railing against bridezilla and chillax and a handful of other contemporary constructions that he finds inelegant. * Lord knows I agree with many of his dislikes. I've never watched Bridezillas ; reality TV shows make me break out in hives. I did use chillax in a post once, but only for mild shock effect. Wikipedia may be a loathsome construction, but the graver problem is its suspect claim to accuracy and reliability.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
One of my recent posts on the unreliability of Wikipedia caught the eye of Edward Buckner, a medievalist, who shared with me a paper he has written about deficiencies in an Oxford University study of the reliability of Wikipedia. You may be aware of a study in 2005 by the journal Nature that found Wikipedia to be, on the whole, about as accurate as the Encyclopedia Britannica . This study is what I take to be the frequently repeated claim by Wikipediasts that the two references are equally reliable, even though Britannica challenged the validity of the study.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Dang, Eric Hartley wants me to be responsible . In a private note, which he has given me permission to use, along with his name, he gently reproaches me for the rhetorical excesses in my most recent post on Wikipedia. He has something there, as you will see. After quoting his note at length, I will try to present a more nuanced and balanced evaluation of Wikipedia's usefulness and limitations. It will be duller than the previous. Mr. Hartley: " To answer your question [ Am I expected to believe that the multitudes who consult Wikipedia every day are using it as a jumping-off point for further research?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
Connoisseurs of nonsense will enjoy the latest example of fatuity at Wikipedia.* Philip Roth discovers that a Wikipedia entry on his novel The Human Stain says that the principal character is based on the late Anatole Broyard. This is not so, and Mr. Roth attempted to get Wikipedia to correct the error. Here is his account of what happened, part of a 2,700-word article i n The New Yorker : "When, through an official interlocutor, I recently petitioned Wikipedia to delete this misstatement, along with two others, my interlocutor was told by the 'English Wikipedia Administrator' - in a letter dated August 25th and addressed to my interlocutor - that I, Roth, was not a credible source: 'I understand your point that the author is the greatest authority on their own work,' writes the Wikipedia Administrator - but we require secondary sources.' " Yes, you read that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
The Walters Art Museum is donating more than 19,000 images of artworks from its collection to the organization running Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia that is created and edited by users. The images will be available for Wikipedia articles in any language, and can be downloaded free of charge. A spokeswoman for the museum said Tuesday that the Walters is just one of several libraries, archives and museums participating in the collaborative effort to provide public access to their collections.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 19, 2012
In 1797, the Shaw of Persia received a set of Encyclopedia Britannica to celebrate his elevation. He read it in its entirety - it was shorter then - and in celebration of this accomplishment, he added "Most Formidable Lord and Master of the Encyclopedia Britannica" to his list of titles. I know this because I read it in Wikipedia. It was included in the entry about the Britannica, which had, of course, just been updated to reflect the fact that it would no longer be available in printed form after 244 years and would complete its migration to the Internet.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 19, 2012
In 1797, the Shaw of Persia received a set of Encyclopedia Britannica to celebrate his elevation. He read it in its entirety - it was shorter then - and in celebration of this accomplishment, he added "Most Formidable Lord and Master of the Encyclopedia Britannica" to his list of titles. I know this because I read it in Wikipedia. It was included in the entry about the Britannica, which had, of course, just been updated to reflect the fact that it would no longer be available in printed form after 244 years and would complete its migration to the Internet.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | May 4, 2007
America is one of the richest countries in the world. It's also one of the worst industrialized places for kids to grow up and has a greater percentage of depressed people than impoverished, war-torn nations do, according to two major studies. The first unflattering finding comes from a recent UNICEF child-welfare study that measured everything from the number of books in the home to infant-mortality rates, drinking and drug use and the percentage of children who eat meals with their families.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
A recent letter to the editor by William D. Young of Timonium titled "Mosque Near Ground Zero a travesty" (Readers Respond, baltimoresun.com) included his assertion that there were "nearly 800,000 (yes 800,000) mosques in New York City. " Wikipedia estimates there are approximately 1,300 mosques in the entire United States. While I can't vouch for the accuracy of Wikipedia, I think the 800,000 figure can be fairly easily debunked. In addition he states that the center will house a memorial honoring the 9/11 hijackers.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel , andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
It's TMI - too much information, in the language of the Internet, cell phone texts and social media posts. Easy juror access to cyberspace is a growing problem for courts, whether it involves the criminal trial of Baltimore's mayor, an Anne Arundel County murder trial or a Florida drug case. Last week, a Maryland appeals court upended a first-degree murder conviction because a juror consulted Wikipedia for trial information. Earlier this year, the appeals judges erased a conviction for three counts of assault because a juror did cyberspace research and shared the findings with the rest of the jury.
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