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NEWS
December 1, 2010
I don't see how WikiLeaks' release of classified cables, which risk international peace and security, is not an act of treason, punishable by law ( "The latest from WikiLeaks: gossip," Nov. 30). It is, additionally, an action that is infuriating because of the reckless endangerment it presents and tiring because of the low, uncommendable, voyeuristic, sideshow appeal. Jaye Dansicker, Sparks
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
- The commander of the Army Military District of Washington has approved the findings of the court-martial last year of WikiLeaker Chelsea Manning. Manning, who served as an intelligence analyst for the Army in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010 as Pfc. Bradley Manning, was accused of giving hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. She was tried last year at Fort Meade, found guilty of 20 offenses and sentenced to 35 years in a military prison. Maj. Gen. Jeffrey S. Buchanan approved the findings and the sentence last week, officials said Monday.
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NEWS
November 30, 2010
I guess the government never learned what my mother told me, "If you don't have something nice to say about someone, don't say anything at all" ("The latest from WikiLeaks: gossip," Nov. 30). I hate to break this news to the president, but no one likes us anyway, so who cares about this leak? Steve Cuprzynski, Cockeysville
NEWS
August 21, 2013
Col. Denise R. Lind, the Army judge who sentenced Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison today after finding him guilty of turning hundreds of thousands of classified documents over to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks, clearly did not buy prosecutors' arguments that he was a self-aggrandizing traitor who deserved to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Nor did she completely accept the defense's claim that Mr. Manning was an emotionally troubled young man who had acted only out of patriotism to alert Americans to what he perceived to be government wrongdoing committed in their name.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Over the weekend, Julian Assange, the reclusive renegade computer hacker who has made a career of unveiling government and corporate secrets on the whistle-blower website Wikileaks, confounded American policymakers for the second time in three months when he released nearly 400,000 classified field reports from the war in Iraq. In July, Wikileaks posted 90,000 classified documents describing a litany of strategic setbacks, human rights abuses and widespread corruption in the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
Julian Assange, the peripatetic and elusive founder of the whistleblower web site Wikileaks, put himself at the center of a fine bit of political theater over the weekend when he used his fugitive status at the Ecuadorean embassy in London to demand the U.S. cease persecuting those who seek to hold governments accountable. Having stage managed a diplomatic crisis between Britain and Ecuador that threatens to rupture relations between the two countries, Mr. Assange is milking the incident for all it's worth, but it remains to be seen whether that will be enough to get him out of the jam he's in. Mr. Assange had been living in London for the last two years after fleeing Sweden to avoid being questioned about two women who claim he raped them.
NEWS
By Ben Barber | December 28, 2010
WikiLeaks reminded me of one of the world's oldest jokes: What is a diplomat? A diplomat is an honest man sent abroad to lie for his country. What bothers me is not that our officials sometimes tell lies for the greater benefit of the country. As a reporter in troubled places, I have sometimes had to tell lies. To enter Burma and China, I said I was a tourist. Had I said I was a reporter, I could not have gone and could not have written articles about the problems and the lives of the people I met there.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
Americans have known for some time that the war in Afghanistan was not going well, and many have suspected that the situation there was much worse than the administration has been willing to publicly acknowledge. But the unauthorized release this week of some 90,000 classified military documents by the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks — and their publication in The New York Times and two European newspapers — offers, for the first time, an excruciatingly detailed view of the difficulties the U.S. is facing against a formidable and determined adversary that is stronger today than at any time since the 2001 invasion that toppled the Taliban.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
Edward Snowden gave the security information to Wikileaks. They decided to put it on their website. I would think they are as guilty as Mr. Snowden and should be fined or jailed for their actions. Our government should never let this happen again. Gerald A. Yamin, Pikesville
NEWS
By Gilead Light | September 1, 2010
The legal pursuit of Wikileaks, a transnational website devoted to publishing secret government documents worldwide, is reaching a boiling point. After publishing tens of thousands of classified U.S. documents revealing details of the war in Afghanistan, the group is now promising to publish more of the same. The actions of the leaker, alleged to be U.S. Army PFC Bradley Manning, are likely violations of U.S. espionage laws. Mr. Manning was already charged under the Espionage Act with the submission to Wikileaks earlier this year of a classified video showing the death of two journalists in Iraq.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Bradley Manning, the junior Army analyst convicted of espionage for leaking thousands of classified documents, was sentenced to 35 years in prison Wednesday, reigniting a debate over how far the government should go to punish those who disclose secret information. The sentence was far less than the 60-year imprisonment military prosecutors had sought and the 90-year maximum sentence the 20 convictions against him carried. Manning will appeal the ruling and will be eligible for parole after serving seven years at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., his attorney said.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
There was no question that Pfc. Bradley Manning broke the law when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks. He admitted as much in pleading guilty to a number of the lesser charges against him, and his motivations - whatever they were - and his evident naivete didn't change that fact. Nonetheless, the case against him was a vexing one. It was never clear that his actions harmed national security in the way the Obama administration claimed, and his mistreatment during a portion of the time he has been held in custody was deplorable.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
Edward Snowden gave the security information to Wikileaks. They decided to put it on their website. I would think they are as guilty as Mr. Snowden and should be fined or jailed for their actions. Our government should never let this happen again. Gerald A. Yamin, Pikesville
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is due back at Fort Meade this week, where lawyers for the alleged WikiLeaker plan to argue that he was punished at a military brig before his case had been heard — grounds, they say, to dismiss all charges against him. By the time he arrived at the Marine Corps brig at Quantico, Va., Manning was world famous. The former intelligence analyst, who lived in Maryland before enlisting in the Army, had been accused of giving hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
Julian Assange, the peripatetic and elusive founder of the whistleblower web site Wikileaks, put himself at the center of a fine bit of political theater over the weekend when he used his fugitive status at the Ecuadorean embassy in London to demand the U.S. cease persecuting those who seek to hold governments accountable. Having stage managed a diplomatic crisis between Britain and Ecuador that threatens to rupture relations between the two countries, Mr. Assange is milking the incident for all it's worth, but it remains to be seen whether that will be enough to get him out of the jam he's in. Mr. Assange had been living in London for the last two years after fleeing Sweden to avoid being questioned about two women who claim he raped them.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
I'm writing today to encourage The Sun to pay greater attention to accused WikiLeaks whistle-blower Pfc.Bradley E. Manning's pre-trial hearings and eventual court martial. Pfc. Manning is accused of leaking the largest document dump in U.S. history to WikiLeaks, including the Iraq and Afghan War Logs as well as the infamous "Collateral Murder" video depicting an Apache helicopter attack on Reuters journalists. Mr. Manning faces 23 different charges including "aiding the enemy," and if convicted, he could spend the rest of his life in prison.
NEWS
November 29, 2010
The latest trove of documents released over the weekend by WikiLeaks does make for titillating reading. The cache of diplomatic cables contains juicy items of the sort usually found in gossip columns. Amid the chitchat there are a few pieces of information that illuminate important questions about American diplomacy. In particular, documents that suggest that diplomats may be crossing the line into low-level spycraft, and revelations about the degree of international concern about Iran's nuclear program, do legitimately inform the international debate.
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