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HEALTH
The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Now that Michael Phelps is out of the spotlight, some other Baltimore residents have been challenging themselves to their own series of competitions. At the North Oaks senior community in Pikesville, a four-day Wii bowling battle began Monday. While there will be no gold medals handed out, the winner is assured if plenty of glory. Why Wii: Jill Meshey, fitness manager for the community, started weekly Wii bowling and golf events about a year ago. She says the seniors at the center tend to be active and participate in classes like aerobics and flexibility and balance.
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NEWS
March 5, 2014
Activity Pals For single seniors. Get together with others to attend events, shop, go sightseeing, dine out and more. 301-596-6385. The Bain Center 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia. 410-313-7213. •ABC's of Herbs and Spices. wed., March 5, 11 a.m. Free. •Acupuncture. Thursdays, 9 a.m. $20 group setting. •Ask the Pharmacist. March 31, 9 a.m. •Balance '4' All. Thursdays, March 6, 13, 20 and 27, 9:15 a.m. Learn strength, posture and flexibility. $18. •Bain 'Buzz' Book Club.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 2007
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- In the competition among the makers of video game consoles, momentum is building for the Wii from Nintendo among its crucial allies: game developers and publishers. Inspired by the early success of the Wii, companies that create and distribute games are beginning to shift resources and personnel toward building more Wii games, in some cases at the expense of the competing systems: the PlayStation 3 from Sony Corp. and Xbox 360 from Microsoft Corp. The shift is closely watched because consumers tend to favor systems that have many compelling games.
FEATURES
By Tim Swift and Tim Swift,Sun reporter | November 12, 2007
Mario is finally super again. In Super Mario Galaxy, the classic franchise is back and better than ever after years of so-so adventures. Galaxy nimbly walks a tightrope to give gamers just the right mix of substantial innovations and familiar features that have been built up over decades of past incarnations. Super Mario Galaxy (Nintendo) Available on Nintendo Wii. Rated E for everyone. Retail price: $49.99.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | February 24, 2012
News Roundup •••• Sony launched the PlayStation Vita on Wednesday in North America and Europe, and analysts are predicting it could actually be a hit for the beleaguered company despite slowing sales in Japan. [ Los Angeles Times ] •••• EA Sports' “NBA Live” franchise, which was briefly “NBA Elite” and then briefly non-existent, will be back for a 2013 edition. I hope EA just caves to “Linsanity” and throws Jeremy Lin on the cover.
FEATURES
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,Sun reporter | December 25, 2006
Sunday, Dec. 17, 1:45 a.m.: I pull into the parking lot of the Target in Abingdon, haul a folding chair and sleeping bag from my car, and approach a few folks near the entrance. The chilly night air casts a fog around the sodium vapor lights on the nearly deserted lot. The store is due to open in about six hours. "You here for the Wii?" someone asks. "You're too late." Thousands of children will wake this morning, hearts racing, and dash to their living rooms to find ... cash or a gift card redeemable for the elusive Nintendo Wii or Sony PlayStation 3. It won't be the stuff of screaming video scenes or Kodak moments.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 21, 2008
A Rockville technology company took on Japanese gaming giant Nintendo yesterday, saying it filed patent-infringement complaints with two federal agencies asking that U.S. importation of the popular Wii video game system be halted. Hillcrest Labs, which licenses a technology to manufacturers that use it to make motion controls for digital media, said it filed a lawsuit in a Maryland U.S. District Court alleging that components of Nintendo's Wii game systems infringe upon four of its intellectual property patents.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | February 19, 2008
Never mind defeating Bob Ehrlich in the governor's race, or sparring with rival du jour Peter Franchot. Or even rounding up the votes to close a billion-dollar budget shortfall. The real test of Gov. Martin O'Malley's moxie yesterday was this: In his first-ever foray into the world of cyber-bowling, would he be able to keep his ball out of the gutter? Moreover, could he do well enough to beat a septuagenarian who walks with a polished wooden cane? "Everyone seems to know what the Wii is," O'Malley joked to a packed audience at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
Wii're all sold out. Legions of shoppers are getting the message nearly everywhere they look for Nintendo Co.'s video game console. Even though it ramped up production capacity twice this year, Nintendo isn't meeting demand for the Wii, which has been on the market for more than a year and is, somehow, this season's hottest hard-to-find gift. Nintendo executives said the Japanese company had thought its production schedule -- about 1.8 million consoles a month -- would be sufficient.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | December 15, 2007
Lucile "Suey" McLean eyes the three X's on the scoreboard. "That's it, babe," she shouts. "That's a turkey." Nina Finn then steps up, murmuring, "Kiss, kiss, kiss," as she coaxes her ball toward the pins. The last one falls, and Finn shimmies past her opponents, saying, "They want me to do my wiggle." These might seem like moves made for the neighborhood bowling alley. But to these retirees, actually heaving a ball down a lane of polished wood is a pursuit that is, well, a bit behind the times.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,sun reporter | July 28, 2007
The first time Adam Wallis wanted a Wii, he sat outside for 12 hours on a bitterly cold Sunday in November while he waited for a Target in Glen Burnie to open its doors. The finger- and feet-numbing experience was worth it. The 23-year-old Abingdon resident and his two brothers each snagged a Wii, which had just been released, at $250 apiece - only to turn around and sell the extremely coveted Nintendo video-game machine on eBay for a tidy $600 profit. Little did he know that eight months later, he and his wife, Stephanie, would be itching to own their own Wii and finding it difficult to get their hands on the hot, hot, hot console.
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